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Full text of "The Labour gazette January-June 1961"

HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO PRESS 



CoYcmment 
Publications 




{TUE 

LABOUR GAZETTE 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, CANADA 



INDE^ 

VOLUME LXI 

FOR THE YEAR 
1961 



Minister — Hon. Michael Starr 
Deputy Minister — George V. Haythorne Editor — William S. Drinkwater 



ROGER DUHAMEL, F.R.S.C. 
QUEEN'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 
OTTAWA, 1962 
54609-3—1 



PAGE NUMBERS OF MONTHLY EDITIONS 

Month 

1- 96 January 

97- 200 February 

201- 312 March 

313- 424 Apra 

425- 528 May 

529- 612 June 

613- 740 ' July 

741- 860 August 

861- 988 September 

989-1092 October 

1094-1192 November 

1194-1316 December 



ERRATA 

On page 654 — Column 2 — ^para. 2 — last line — for "micro- 
effect" read "macro-effect". 

On page 778 — under "Union Security Clauses" — Column 2 — 
para. 2 — 4th line — for employer read employee. 




Sli^iH 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

AASERE — Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach 
Employees of America. 

ACA — American Communications Association. 

ACTRA — Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists. 

AFL-CIO — American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. 

AMC — Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen. 

ANG — American Newspaper Guild. 

ARTEC — Association of Radio and Television Employees of Canada. 

BELU — Barnhill's Employees' Labour Union. 

BLE — Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. 

BLFE • — Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen. 

BMWE — Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees. 

BPDPA — Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America. 

BRSC — Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express 
and Station Employees. 

BRT — Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. 

CAALL — Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour Legislation. 

CALDA — Canadian Air Line Dispatchers' Association. 

CALFAA — Canadan Air Line Flight Attendants' Association. 

CALPA — Canadian Air Line Pilots' Association. 

CB — Conciliation Board. 

CBRT(GW) — Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers. 

CCA — Canadian Construction Association. 

CCC — Canadian Chamber of Commerce. 

CCCL — Canadian and Catholic Confederation of Labour. 

CLC — Canadian Labour Congress. 

CMA — Canadian Manufacturers Association. 

CMCH — Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. 

CMSG — Canadian Merchant Service Guild. 

CNRPA — Canadian National Railways Police Association. 

CNTU — Confederation of National Trade Unions. 

CO — Conciliation Officer. 

CSA — Canadian Standards Association. 

CSAC — Civil Service Association of Canada. 

CTU — Commercial Telegraphers' Union. 

CTWA — Canadian Transport Workers' Association. 

DBS — Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 

FEIA — Flight Engineers' International Association. 

FLC — Farm Labour Conference. 

GATT — General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

HCTEU — Hull City Transport Employees Union. 

HREBIU — Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union. 

lAM — International Association of Machinists. 

lATSE — International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture 
Machine Operators of the United States and Canada. 

IBBH — International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Black- 
smiths, Forgers and Helpers. 

IBT — International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America. 



m 



IV 



INDEX 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS— Cone. 



ICFTU — International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. 

ILA — International Longshoremen's Association. 

ILGW • — International Ladies' Garment Workers Union. 

ILO — International Labour Organization. 

ILWU — International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. 

IRB — International Railway Brotherhoods. 

ISEUA — International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union of North America. 

ITU — International Typographical Union. 

lUMMSW — International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers. 

lUOE — International Union of Operating Engineers. 

IWW — International Woodworkers of America. 

LPU — Labourers' Protective Union. 

MEBAC — Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of Canada. 

MFL — Manitoba Federation of Labour. 

MHPB — Montreal Harbour Police Brotherhood (Ind.). 

MSEA — Marconi Salaried Employees Association. 

NABET — National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians. 

NAME — National Association of Marine Engineers. 

NCCL — National Council of Canadian Labour. 

NES — National Employment Service. 

NHBPB — National Harbours Board Police Brotherhood. 

NLU — Newfoundland Labourers' Union. 

NSMW — National Syndicate of Maritime Workers. 

NUIP — Newfoundland Union of Journalists and Photographers. 

NUOE — National Union of Operating Engineers of Canada. 

NUPE — National Union of Public Employees. 

NUPSE — National Union of Public Service Employees. 

OAWU — Ottawa Atomic Workers Union. 

OCAWIU — Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers' International Union. 

OFL — Ontario Federation of Labour. 

ORT — Order of Railroad Telegraphers. 

PWALTEA — Pacific Western Airlines Traffic Employees' Association. 

QFL — Quebec Federation of Labour. 

RTEU — Radio and Television Employees' Union. 

RWDSU — Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. 

SIU — Seafarers' International Union of North America. 

UAW — United Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural Implement Workers of 

America, International Union. 

UBC — University of British Columbia. 

UBCJ — United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

UBW — United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of 

America, International Union. 

UMWA — United Mine Workers of America. 

UN — United Nations. 

UPMPW — United Paper Makers and Paper Workers. 

UPWA — United Packinghouse Workers of America. 

USWA — United Steel Workers of America. 

VHEA — Vancouver Harbour Employees' Association. 



INDEX 



Abitibi Power and Paper Company, Limited: 
NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers: granted, 469. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 154; granted, 
469. 

Accidents, Industrial: 

Canada 

industrial fatalities in 1960, 458. 

industrial fatalities during the first quarter of 

1961, 660; during the second quarter of 

1961, 1025. 
industrial fatalities during the third quarter of 

1960, 25; during the fourth quarter of 1960, 

354. 
job injuries in the Civil Service — report of 

Government Employees Compensation 

Branch for fiscal year ended March 31, 1961, 

1094. 
Sickness and Accident Provisions in Canadian 

Industries — report issued by Department of 

Labour, 874. 

Quebec 

Workmen's Compensation Act: views expressed 
by QFL, 447. 

United Kingdom 

annual report of Chief Inspector of Factories, 

165. 

Statistics 
"Labour Statistics: H-Industrial Accidents" 

(quarterly and annual feature). 

Advisory Committee on Professional Man- 
power: 

meeting, 6th, 19. 
Aerial Tramways: 

See Ski Tows. 
Age and Employment: 

See Older Workers. 
Agreements: 

See Collective Labour Agreements. 
Agriculture: 

See also Farm Homes; Income. 
Canada 
report on survey to determine needs for agri- 
cultural training in Canada given at meeting 
of National Technical and Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 1214. 

Alaska Cruise Lines Limited: 

SIU 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; settlement, 472. 
Alberta Federation of Labour: 
convention, 6th, 1248. 
54609-^—2 



Alberta Wheat Pool: 

UBW 

dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company: 

Associated Non-operating Unions 
(negotiating committee) 

dispute: settlement, 675. 
MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers: received, 45; represen- 
tation vote, 470; rejected, 915; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric 
Railway and Motor Coach Employees of 
America: 

CNR (Niagara, St. Catharines and 
Toronto Railway) 

dispute: C.B. report, 257, 260; settlement, 370. 
Hull City Transport Limited 

certification application by Local 591 on be- 
half of a unit of bus drivers and garage 
employees: received, 470; request for con- 
sent under Section 7 (4) denied, 672. 

Hull Metropolitan Transport Limited 

certification application by Local 591 on be- 
half of a unit of bus drivers and garage 
employees: received, 470; request for consent 
under Section 7 (4) denied, 672. 

American Communications Association: 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

dispute: (Cable Division): C.B. appointed, 257; 

C.B. fully constituted, 369; C.B. report, 798, 

814. 
American Federation of Labor and Congress 

of Industrial Organizations: 

suggestions of Economic Policy Committee for 
economic recovery, 454. 

American Newspaper Guild: 

Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting 
Limited 

certification application by Local 87 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 256; 
granted, 566. 



VI 



INDEX 



Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

dispute with Local 213: C.B. report, 258, 263; 
settlement, 370. 

Vantel Broadcasting Company Limited 

certification application by Local 115 on behalf 
of certain employees in News, Production, 
and Administrative Departments at CHAN- 
TV, Vancouver: received, 567; granted, 794. 

Anti-discrimination: 

See Discrimination. 
Apprenticeship: 

Canada 

emphasis on apprenticeship training urged by 

CCA President Arthur G. Sullivan, 1137. 
establishment of National Advisory Committee 

on Technological Education, 550; report of 

committee, 1213. 
4,000 apprentices finish training in 1959-60, 

double 10 years ago, 109. 
views expressed by CCA, 353. 

United Kingdom 

new apprentice training scheme organized, 873. 
Laws and Regulations 
Alberta 
Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 571. 

British Columbia 
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification 
Act: regulations, 1046. 
Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — VII — 
Part 6 — ^Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's 
Qualification, 556. 

Manitoba 
Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 695. 
Tradesmen's Qualifications Act: provisions, 
1098. 

Newfoundland 
Apprenticeship Act: amendments, 270. 

Ontario 
Apprenticeship Act: amendments, 163. 
Arbitration, Labour: 

Canada 
Labour Arbitration in Canada — summary of 
book by Prof. A. W. R. Carrothers, Uni- 
versity of British Columbia, 1216. 
Legal Decisions 

N.B. Supreme Court (Appeal Division) 
quashes arbitration award because arbitrators 
did not take oath prescribed by Arbitration 
Act, 689. 

Ont. Court of Appeal quashes an arbitration 
award and upholds a company's right to 
retire employees at age 65, 687. 

Ont. Court of Appeal upholds ruling that 
arbitration board has the power to award 
damages for breach of agreement, 1276. 



Ont. High Court rules that arbitration board 
has the power to assess damages for breach 
of collective agreement, 379. 

Supreme Court of Newfoundland remits arbi- 
tration award to arbitrators for reconsidera- 
ation as it altered terms of agreement, 1154. 

Leslie Armstrong Mail Service: 

IBT 

certification application by Local 879 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: representation 
vote, 43; rejected, 153. 

Asbestos Eastern Limited: 

IBT 

certification application by Locals 938 and 
106 on behalf of a unit of employees: 
received, 369. 

Asbestos Transport Limited: 

Association of Employees of Asbestos and 
Eastern Transport Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees operating in and out of Asbestos, 
Montreal, Quebec City, Victoriaville and 
Sherbrooke, Que., and Toronto, Ont.: re- 
ceived, 674; rejected, 915. 

IBT 

certification application by Locals 938 and 
106 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
ceived, 369; representation vote, 566; re- 
jected, 672. 

Associated Non-operating Unions (Negotiating 
Committee): 

Algoma Central and Hudson 
Bay Railway Company 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Canadian National Railways 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Midland Railway of Manitoba 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Ontario Northland Railway 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Toronto^ Hamilton and Buffalo 
Railway Company 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Association of Canadian Television and Radio 
Artists: 

Canadian Marconi Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees employed at CFCF-TV, Mon- 
treal: received, 915. 



INDEX 



vn 



certification application on behalf of a unit of 
performers and staff announcers employed 
at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 1037; 
withdrawn, 1037; granted, 1147; request for 
special leave (Rule 8) denied, 1149. 

Association of Employees of Asbestos and 
Eastern Transport Limited: 

Asbestos Transport Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees operating in and out of Asbestos, 
Montreal, Quebec City, Victoriaville and 
Sherbrooke, Que., and Toronto, Ont.: re- 
ceived, 674; rejected, 915. 

Eastern Transport Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees operating in and out of Asbestos, 
Montreal, Quebec City, Victoriaville and 
Sherbrooke, Que., and Toronto, Ont.: re- 
ceived, 674; rejected, 915. 

Association of Employees of M & P Transport: 

M & P Transport Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of drivers and dockmen: received, 568; 
granted, 794. 

Association of Employees of Overnite Express 
Limited: 

Overnite Express Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees working in and out of Mon- 
treal, St. Jerome and Hull, Que., and 
Toronto, Ont.: withdrawn, 1037. 

Association of Radio and Television Employees 
of Canada: 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

dispute: (building and maintenance em- 
ployees); settlement, 257. 

Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores Limited (repre- 
sented by Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees, received, 1269. 

Atomic Energy: 

ILO and Euratom sign agreement on protec- 
tion against radiation, 151. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Atomic Energy Control Act — Radiation Warn- 
ing Symbol Order, 481. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited: 
OAWV 

dispute with Local 1541 (employees. Com- 
mercial Products Division, Ottawa): CO. 
appointed, 569; settlement, 674. 

54609-3— 2i 



Atomic Transfer Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 979 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 915; with- 
drawn, 1037. 

Automation: 

Canada 

views expressed by CNTU, 23 L 
United Kingdom 

British unions report on effects of automation 
in oflfices, 670. 

United States 

Office of Automation and Manpower estab- 
lished by Department of Labor, 1053. 

(TAP) — technological adjustment pay — for 
workers displaced by technological changes 
provided in contract signed by Armour and 
Company and UPWA and AMC, 938. 



B 



H.W. Bacon Limited: 

JET 

dispute with Local 419: CO. appointed, 796; 
CB. appointed, 1040; CB. fully constituted, 
1151. 

Banking: 

See Women in Industry. 
Bamhill's Transfer Limited: 
IBT 

dispute with Locals 76 and 927: settlement, 45. 

dispute with Locals 76 and 927: CO. ap- 
pointed, 921; CB. appointed, 1040; CB. 
fully constituted , 1151. 

Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting Limited: 

AISG 

certification application by Local 87 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 256; 
granted, 566. 

lATSE 

certification application by Local 873 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 256; 
granted, 566. 

NABET 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (CFTO-TV): received, 256; 
granted, 566. 

Beaver Dredging Company Limited: 

SIU 

dispute: CO. appointed, 568; settlement, 674. 
Belgium 

experiment suggests retraining works for the 
few, 876. 



vra 



INDEX 



Bennett and White Construction Company 
Limited: 

UBCJ 

certification application by Local 2499 on 
behalf of a unit of carpenters: received, 369; 
granted, 566. 

Blindness Allowances: 

Canada 

statistics, 110, 439, 752, 1139. 
BoUers: 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 
Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act: regulations, 
691, 1045. 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^V — 
Industrial Safety and Health — Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel, and Operating Engineers 
Legislation, 357. 

New Brunswick 
Stationary Engineers Act: amendments, 1235. 

Nova Scotia 
Engine Operators Act: amendments, 1236. 

Ontario 
report of Royal Commission on Industrial 
Safety — recommendations, 1238. 

Boyles Bros. Drilling Company Limited: 
WMMSW 

certification application by Local 1005 on be- 
half of a unit of employees employed in 
Yukon Territory, 567; withdrawn, 568. 

dispute with Local 1005: (Yellowknife 
Branch); CO. appointed, 674; settlement, 
797. 

British Columbia Air Lines Limited: 

CBRT 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257; CB. appointed, 
569; CB. fully constituted, 675; CB. report, 
922, 929; settlement, 1041. 

British Columbia Federation of Labour: 

convention, 6th, 1246. 

disaffiliation with Federation approved by B.C. 
Government Employees Association, 16. 

British Columbia Government Employees As- 
sociation: 

approves disaffiliation with B.C. Federation of 
Labour, 16. 

British Columbia Towboat Owners' Association 
(certain member companies): 

CBRT 

dispute with Local 400: CO. appointed, 1271. 
British Trades Union Congress: 
See Trades Union Congress (Great Britain). 



John N. Brocklesby Transport Limited: 

tBT 

certification application by Local 419 on behalf 
of a unit of float drivers: received, 1037; 
granted, 1147. 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers: 

CNR (Atlantic, Central and Western 
Regions) 

dispute: CB. appointed, 675; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 797. 

CPR (Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and 
Pacific Regions) 
dispute: CB. appointed, 675; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 798. 

Quebec Central Railway Company- 
dispute: CB. appointed, 675; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 798. 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and 
Enginemen: 

CNR (Atlantic, St. Lawrence, Great 

Lakes, Mountain and Prairie Regions, 

including Newfoundland 

and District) 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
921; CB. fully constituted, 1040. 

CPR (Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and 
Pacific Regions) 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
921; CB. fully constituted, 1040. 

Dominion Atlantic Railway 
Company 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
921; CB. fully constituted, 1040. 

Quebec Central Railway Company 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
921; CB. fully constituted, 1040. 

Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Em- 
ployees: 

Canadian National Railways 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (hump yard, Moncton): with- 
drawn, 45. 

Quebec North Shore and Labrador 
Railway Company 

request for review of decision under Section 61 
(2) of Act: 796; granted, 1037. 

White Pass and Yukon Route 

certification application by Local 605 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 1149; with- 
drawn, 1269. 

Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen: 

Canadian National Railways 

dispute: CB. appointed, 797; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 922. 



INDEX 



K 



Canadian Pacific Railway 

dispute: (dining, cafe and buffet car em- 
ployees): CO. appointed, 797; settlement, 
921. 

CPR (Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and 
Pacific Regions) 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 921; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1040. 

Sydney and Louisburg Railway 
Company 

certification application by Local 684 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 1269. 

Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship Clerks, 
Freight Handlers, Express and Station Em- 
ployees: 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 472; settlement, 674. 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

dispute: employees in Merchandise Services 
Department: CO. appointed, 1270. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company 
Limited 

dispute with Local 264: settlement, 257. 

Gaspe Shipping Reg*d 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 1269. 

Lakehead Terminal Elevators 

Association (Fort William 

and Port Arthur) 

dispute with Local 650: CO. appointed, 568; 
settlement, 674. 

Manitoba Pool Elevators 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
electricians in grain elevator at Port Arthur: 
received, 154; withdrawn, 471. 

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
electricians in terminal elevator division at 
Fort William and Port Arthur: received, 
155; withdrawn, 471. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen at Port of Toronto: received, 
568; granted, 794; review of Decision under 
section 61 (2) of Act, 916; granted, 1037. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen at Fort William and Port 
Arthur: received, 796; granted, 1035. 

Western Terminals Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 1150. 



Brown and Ryan Limited (represented by 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Building and Construction: 

See Construction Industry. 

Building Service Employees International 
Union: 

Northern Cleaning Agencies, Inc, 
dispute with Local 298: CO. appointed, 369. 
Buntain Bell and Company Limited: 

LPV 
dispute: CO. appointed, 921. 
Burrard Terminals Limited: 

VBW 

dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 



Cadwell Marine Limited: 
SW 

dispute: settlement, 257. 

Caledon Terminals Limited: 
ILA 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions); CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 
798, 803; strike action after Board pro- 
cedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. 
fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited: 

BRSC 

dispute: CO. appointed, 472; settlement, 674. 

Canada Tungsten Mining Corporation Limited: 

JUMMSW 

certification application by Local 1031 on be- 
half of a unit of strip miners in Flat Creek 
area of NWT: received, 915; granted, 1035. 

Canada Year Book: 

1961 edition, 1211. 

Canadian Air Line Flight Attendants Associa- 
tion: 

Trans-Canada Air Lines 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 45; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 257; C.B, report, 675, 679; settle- 
ment, 922. 



INDEX 



Canadian Air Line Pilots Association: 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited 

dispute: settlement, 257. 

Quehecair Inc. 

dispute: C.B. report, 257, 258; lapsed, 1175. 

TransAir Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
pilots: received, 369; granted, 672. 

Trans-Canada Airlines 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1150. 

Canadian Arsenals Limited (Gun Ammunition 
Division): 

WOE 

dispute with Local 796: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1150. 

Canadian Association of Administrators of 
Labour Legislation: 

meeting, 20th, 1005. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: 

ANG 

dispute with Local 213: CB. report, 258, 263; 
settlement, 370. 

ARTEC 

dispute: (building and maintenance em- 
ployees): settlement, 257. 

NABET 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; settlement, 472. 

Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport 
and General Workers: 

new CNR-CBRT agreement amalgamates three 
large ones covering clerical, express and 
cartage employees, 1215. 

British Columbia Air Lines Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257; CB. appointed, 
569; C.B. fully constituted, 675; C.B. report, 
922, 929; settlement, 1041. 

British Columbia Towboat Owners'* 

Association (certain member 

companies) 

dispute with Local 400: CO. appointed, 1271. 

Canadian National Railways 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
electrical employees in ofiice of General 
Material Supervisor at Moncton, N.B.: re- 
ceived, 673; withdrawn, 796. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (hump yard, Moncton): with- 
drawn, 45. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (891 St. Paul St. W. Section of 
the Data Processing Department, Montreal) : 
rejected, 368. 



certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees in Purchases and Stores Account- 
ing Centre, Point St. Charles, Que.: received, 
154; granted, 368. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees in Purchasing and Stores Account- 
ing Centre at Winnipeg: received, 153; 
granted, 368; application for revocation re- 
ceived, 568; rejected, 795. 

Coast Cargo Services Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 1269. 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

Foremost Marine Transporters Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (marine engineers) : rejected, 470. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (unlicensed personnel): rejected, 
470. 

Foundation Maritime Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel employed aboard tug- 
boats: rejected, 255. 

Island Shipping Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel employed aboard Wheat 
King and the Northern Venture: received, 
915; representation vote, 1035; granted, 
1147; rejected, 1148. 

Kingcome Navigation Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: rejected, 43. 

Northwest Shipping Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 672; granted, 
794. 

Quebec Central Transportation 
Company 

dispute: CO. appointed, 155; settlement, 257. 

Rowers Freight and Marine Services 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of longshoremen: received, 1037; granted, 
1147. 

St, Lawrence Seaway Authority 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257; settlement, 472. 
Sydney Transfer and Storage Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees: representation vote, 255; re- 
jected, 470. 



INDEX 



XI 



Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 

warehouse employees and drivers: granted, 

43. 
dispute: CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 

369; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 

675, 676. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation 
Limited 

dispute with Local 425: settlement, 155. 

Westward Shipping Limited 

dispute with Local 425: CO. appointed, 472; 
settlement, 674. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce: 

brief to federal Government, 1258. 
meeting, 32nd, 1110. 

Canadian Construction Association: 

brief to federal Government, 352. 

emphasis on apprenticeship training urged by 
CCA President Arthur G. Sullivan, 1137. 

meeting, 43rd, 236. 

to increase job opportunities, seek business 
abroad, says President Jack M. Soules, 112. 

year-end message of President Jack M. Soules, 
14. 

President Arthur G. Sullivan urges all Cana- 
dian municipalities to apply for federal 
grants under Municipal Winter Works Incen- 
tive Program, 1136. 

Canadian Federation of the Printing Industry 
and Information (CNTU): 

President Gerard Picard, OBE, publishes pro- 
posed Canadian Labour Code, 337. 

Canadian Labour Congress: 

brief to federal Cabinet, 223, 224. 

CLC executive council proposes new role for 
GATT that would provide a method for 
meeting import competition from countries 
maintaining low wage and unfair labour 
standards, 1210. 

Norman S. Dowd retires as Executive Secre- 
tary, and Editor of Canadian Labour, 111. 

President 

answer to Government's reply to CLC brief — 

Claude Jodoin, 229. 
CLC will not try to influence New Democratic 

Party's affairs — Claude Jodoin, 876. 
Claude Jodoin addresses meeting of CCA, 241. 
Labour Day message of Claude Jodoin, 757. 
New Year message of Claude Jodoin, 1195. 
remarks of Claude Jodoin at QFL convention, 

134. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited 

dispute with Local 23736: employees in Grain 
Elevator Division: CO. appointed, 1270. 



Canadian Manufacturers' Association: 

brief to federal Government, 16. 
meeting, 90th, 640. 

President suggests policy for U.S. companies 
in Canada, 15. 

Canadian Marconi Company: 

ACTRA 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees employed at CFCF-TV, Montreal: 
received, 915. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
performers and staff announcers employed at 
CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 1037; with- 
drawn, 1037; granted, 1147; request for 
special leave (Rule 8) denied, 1149. 

lATSE 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 
1037; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1148; request for special leave (Rule 8) 
denied, 1149. 

MSEA 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees (Special Services Division, 
Field Service Group): received, 470; granted, 
794. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 
796; rejected, 1036; reasons for judgment, 
1038; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1148; request for special leave (Rule 8) de- 
nied, 1149. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
performers and staff announcers employed 
at CFCF-TV, Montreal: granted, 1147; re- 
quest for special leave (Rule 8) denied, 1149. 

NABET 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: rejected, 
1036; reasons for judgment, 1038. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 
1037; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1148; request for special leave (Rule 8) 
denied, 1149. 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc.: 

National Sand and Material Company 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of deck officers: received, 43; representation 
vote, 469; granted, 913; rejected, 915. 

Redwood Enterprises Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: received, 796; representation 
vote, 913; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 



xn 



INDEX 



Shell Canadian Tankers Limited 

dispute: (employees on M.V. Western Shell and 
M.V. Tyee Shell): CO. appointed, 568; 
settlement, 674. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation 
Limited 

dispute with Local 425: settlement, 155. 

Westward Shipping Limited 

dispute: (employees on M.V. B.C. Standard 
and M.V. Standard Service): CO. appointed, 
569; settlement, 674. 

Winona Steamship Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of deck officers: received, 796; representation 
vote, 913; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

Canadian National Railways: 

new CNR-CBRT agreement amalgamates three 
large ones covering clerical, express and 
cartage employees, 1215. 

Associated Non-operating Unions 
(negotiating committee) 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

BMWE 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (hump yard, Moncton): with- 
drawn, 45. 

BRT 

dispute: CB. appointed, 797; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 922. 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
electrical employees in office of General 
Material Supervisor at Moncton, N.B.: re- 
ceived, 673; withdrawn, 796. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (hump yard, Moncton): with- 
drawn, 45. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (891 St. Paul St. W. Section of 
the Data Processing Department, Montreal): 
rejected, 368. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees in Purchases and Stores Account- 
ing Centre, Point St. Charles, Que.: received, 
154; granted, 368. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees in Purchasing and Stores Account- 
ing Centre at Winnipeg: received, 153; 
granted, 368; application for revocation re- 
ceived, 568; rejected, 795. 

Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, Central 
and Western Regions): 

BLE 

dispute: CB. appointed, 675; CB. fully con- 
stituted. 797. 



Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, St. 
Lawrence, Great Lakes, Mountain and 
Prairie Regions, including Newfoundland 
and District): 

BLFE 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
921; CB. fully constituted, 1040. 

Canadian National Railways (Niagara, St. 
Catharines and Toronto Railway): 

AASERE 

dispute: CB. report, 257, 260; settlement, 370. 

Canadian National Railways (North Sydney, 

N.S.): 

JLA 

dispute with Local 1259: CO. appointed, 1150; 
settlement, 1271. 

Canadian National Steamship Company Lim- 
ited (Pacific Coast Service): 

SW 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1270. 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited: 

Board of Adjustment established for disposi- 
tion of disputes between Company and 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, 76. 

CALPA 

dispute: settlement, 257. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company: 

Associated Non-operating Unions 
(negotiating committee) 

dispute: settlement, 675. 
BRSC 

dispute: employees in Merchandise Services 
Department: CO. appointed, 1270. 

BRT 

dispute: (dining, cafe and buffet car em- 
ployees): CO. appointed, 797; settlement, 
921. 

SIU 

dispute: certain employees on SS Princess 
Helene: CB. report, 45, 46; settlement, 1041. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Atlantic, 
Eastern Prairie and Pacific Regions): 

BLFE 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
921; CB. fully constituted, 1040. 

BRT 

dispute: CB. appointed, 921; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 1040. 



INDEX 



xm 



Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Atlantic, 
Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions and 
Quebec Central Railway Company): 

BLE 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 675; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 798. 

Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited (repre- 
sented by Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1: 

summary of decisions, 54, 372, 682, 934. 
Canadian Stevedoring Company Limited: 
JLWU 

certification application by Local 501 on be- 
half of a unit of employees classified as 
checkers, mechanics, drivers, shedmen and 
janitors, at Terminal Dock at Vancouver: 
received, 672; granted, 794. 

Canadian Tax Foundation: 

cost of federal social welfare — address by Dr. 
R. M. Clarke, University of British Colum- 
bia, to 14th annual conference of the 
Foundation, 23. 

Canuk Lines Limited: 

SW 

dispute: CO. appointed, 796. 

Capital Cost Allowances: 

Canada 

program of Special Capital Cost Allowances for 
production of new products, 881. 

Central Mortgage and Housing: 

CSAC 

certification application by Ottawa-Hull Local 
Council on behalf of a unit of heating and 
power plant employees: received, 44; 
granted, 153. 

Central Truck Lines Limited: 

IBT 

certification application by Locals 106 and 
938 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
ceived, 796; representation vote, 913; 
granted, 1035. 

VMWA 

certification application by Local 15026 on 
behalf of a unit of employees: representa- 
tion vote, 913; granted, 1035. 
54609-3—3 



Certification: 

Certification and Other Proceedings before the 
Canada Labour Relations Board (monthly 
feature). 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1225, 
1226. 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — VIII — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation, 772. 

Legal Decisions 

B.C. Court of Appeal allows the appeal from 
the decision of the trial court that quashed 
17 certification orders, 685. 

B.C. Supreme Court quashes 17 certification 
orders applicable to areas where employers 
not at that time operating, 375. 

Man. Court of Queen's Bench denies jurisdic- 
tion of Labour Relations Board to conduct 
representation vote on decertification, 56. 

Sam Chados (represented by the Shipping Fed- 
eration of Canada, Inc.): 

JLA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Channel Seven Television Limited: 

NABET 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees at Station CJAY-TV, Winni- 
peg; received, 672; granted, 794. 

Check-off: 

Laws' and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1225, 
1227. 

Chignecto Canal: 

Government will not proceed with project, 
1138. 

Civil Service: 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Civil Service Act: regulations, 1278. 
Civil Service Association of Canada: 

Central Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation 

certification application by Ottawa-Hull Local 
Council on behalf of a unit of heating and 
power plant employees: received, 44; granted, 
153. 

National Harbours Board 
(Churchill Harbour) , 
dispute: CO. appointed, 1270; settlement, 1271. 



xrv 



INDEX 



National Harbours Board (Quebec) 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of harbour police: received, 1150. 

Civilian Rehabilitation: 

See Vocational Rehabilitation. 
Coal Mining: 
ILO Tripartite Technical Meeting to consider 

social consequences of the coal crisis, 150. 

Canada 

costs decrease, revenue increases, reports 
Dominion Coal Board, 1005. 

Coast Cargo Services Limited: 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of unlicensed personnel: received, 1269. 

Collective Bargaining: 

Canada 

Collective Bargaining Review (monthly feature). 

motives and methods in collective bargaining 
criticized by President of Ford Motor Com- 
pany of Canada, 766. 

United States 

collective bargaining developing new lines as 
world changes — ^W. Willard Wirtz, Under 
Secretary of Labor, 1006. 

summary of report on study of collective bar- 
gaining in the steel industry by the Depart- 
ment of Labor, 374. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^VIII — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation, 772. 

Legal Decisions 

N.B. Supreme Court quashes certification order 
because there were no employees in bargain- 
ing unit when order made, 269. 

Collective Labour Agreements: 

Laws and Regulations 

Quebec 
Collective Agreement Act: amendment, 1229. 

Legal Decisions 

Man. Court of Queen's Bench holds purchaser 
of assets of bankrupt business not bound 
by the existing collective agreement, 158. 

Provisions 

Canada 
new CNR-CBRT agreement amalgamates three 
large ones covering clerical, express and 
cartage employees, 1215. 



United States 

agreement limiting number of jobs railroad may 
abolish . . . signed between railway and 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, 1210. 

profit-sharing plan and wider s.u.b. pro- 
visions gained by UAW, 1041. 

unique collective agreement cuts housing costs, 
634. 

Commercial Cable Company: 

NAME 

certification on behalf of a unit of marine en- 
gineers: representation vote, 470; granted, 
672. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers aboard vessels based in 
Canada: received, 44; representation vote, 
470; granted, 672. 

dispute: (SS Cable Guardian) (licensed en- 
gineers): CO. appointed, 797; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 1040; C.B. fully constituted, 1151. 

dispute: (SS Cable Guardian) (unlicensed per- 
sonnel): CO. appointed, 797. 

Commonwealth Study Conference: 

Prince Philip to address opening session of 
second conference on human consequences 
of the changing industrial environment to be 
held in Montreal, 874. 

Commonwealth Training Week: 
See Training. 

Conciliation: 

Conciliation and Other Proceedings before the 
Minister of Labour (monthly feature). 

Laws and Regulations 

Quebec 
Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1228. 
Conditions of Employment: 

See Labour Conditions. 
Confederation of National Trade Unions: 
brief to federal Cabinet, 223, 230. 

General President 

Jean Marchand elected, 335. 

Labour Day message of Jean Marchand, 758. 

New Year message of Jean Marchand, 1196. 

Roger Mathieu's answer to Government's reply 
to CNTU brief, 233. 

Roger Mathieu retires and joins Quebec Work- 
men's Compensation Commission, 335. 

Secretary-General 

Marcel Pepin elected, 335. 
Consolidated Aviation Fueling Services Limited: 
lAM 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
fueling service personnel employed at Mon- 
treal International Airport, Dorval: received, 
796; granted, 913; application for revocation 
received, 1150. 



INDEX 



XV 



Consolidated Freightways: 

OEIU 

dispute with Local 15: CO. appointed, 155; 
settlement, 257. 

Construction Industry: 

Canada 

construction in 1961 seen equal to program 

of 1960 by CCA, 14. 
two million man-hours of work from defence 

jobs December 1 -March 31, 14. 

Latcs and Regulations 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — In- 
dustrial Safety and Health, 463. 

Ontario 

Construction Hoists Act: regulations, 1232. 
recommendations of Royal Commission on 
Industrial Safety, 1238. 

Consumer Price Index: 

See Prices. 

Co-operative Associations: 
Canada 

Co-operation in Canada, 1960 — 29th annual 
edition, 1062. 

Costs and Standards of Living: 

Prices and the Cost of Living (monthly fea- 
ture). 

Canada 

average family spent $4,830 in 1957, DBS 

sample survey shows, 337. 
consumer price index revised, 398. 

Counselling: 

Canada 

NES counselling and placement in the 1960's, 
656. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited (repre- 
sented by the Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application Ijy Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; CB. appointed, 
472; CB. fully constituted, 473; CB. re- 
port, 798, 803; strike action after Board 
procedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; CB. appointed, 369; CB. 
fully consituted, 473; CB. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 
-3-3i 



Cunard Steamship Company Limited (repre- 
sented by the Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 



D 



Davie Transportation Limited: 

SW 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
1151; CB. fully constituted, 1271. 

Denison Mines Limited: 

VSWA 

dispute with Local 5185 (office and technical 
employees): settlement, 45. 

Department of Labour: 

Publishes Provincial Labour Standards — De- 
cember 1960, 480. 

series of broadcasts on older worker problem, 
826, 964, 1028. 

study on Government Supervised Strike Votes 
by Prof. E. R. Anton, University of Alberta, 
under Labour Department — University Re- 
search Program, 762. 

trade analyses, 702. 

Assistant Deputy Minister 

remarks of Dr. George V. Haythorne at open- 
ing meeting on Commonwealth Technical 
Training Week, 221. 

address of Gordon Gushing, Government dele- 
gate and head of Canadian delegation, at 
45th International Labour Conference, 786. 

appointment of Dr. William R. Dymond, 1004. 

Deputy Minister 

Arthur H. Brown retires and joins ILO as 
Director of Canada Branch, 12. 

appointment of Dr. George V. Haythorne, 213. 

remarks of George V. Haythorne, at 2nd 
meeting. National Technical and Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 1212. 

Economics and Research Branch 

J. P. Francis named Director, 1209. 

The Current Status of Electronic Data Pro- 
cessing in Canada — No. 9A in series "Re- 
search Program on the Training of Skilled 
Manpower", 444. 

engineering and scientific salaries in 1961: pre- 
liminary survey, 662. 

Engineering and Scientific Manpower Resources 
in Canada: Their Earnings, Employment and 
Education, 1959: No. 9 in Professional Man- 
power Bulletin Series, 445. 



XVI 



INDEX 



Engineering and Scientific Manpower Re- 
sources in Canada: Their Employment, 
Earnings and Salary Rates, 1960-61: No. 10 
in Professional Manpower Bulletin Series, 
1211. 

Printing Trades — monograph No. 9 — new edi- 
tion in Canadian Occupation series, 334. 

Shift Work and Shift Differentials in Cana- 
dian Manufacturing Industries, 877. 

Sickness and Accident Provisions in Canadian 
Industries — report issued by Department of 
Labour, 874. 

Library 

Publications Recently Received (monthly fea- 
ture). 

Minister 

Hon Michael Starr — 
addresses — 

national business conference on employ- 
ment, 137. 
first meeting of National Technical and 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
550. 
first national conference on technological 

training, 546. 
second meeting, National Technical and 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
1212. 
announces — 

extension of Municipal Winter Works In- 
centive Program, 332, 752. 
federal-provincial plan to expand voca- 
tional and technical training facilities 
in Nova Scotia, 872. 
cannot compare situation now to thirties says 

the Minister, 334. 
discusses labour problems with U.S. Secre- 
tary of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg, in 
Washington, 541. 
Labour Day message, 755. 
New Year message, 1194. 
remarks at opening meeting on Common- 
wealth Technical Training Week, 219. 
replies to letter sent to employers on hiring 

and retention of older workers, 1260. 
reply to brief presented by CLC, 228. 
suggests higher allowances for unemployed 

undergoing training, 1137. 
urges co-operation on labour-management 

problems, 213. 
visit to United States returned by Secretary 
of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg, 1135. 

Women's Bureau 

A New Career for Women After 30, 22. 

A Niche of Usefulness — booklet describes how 

handicapped women can help themselves, 

634. 



Department of Trade and Commerce: 
Minister 

Hon. George Hees issues review of Canada's 
economy in 1960 and outlook for 1961, 13. 
Department of Transport: 
Minister 

Mr. Balcer's reply to brief presented by IRB, 
236. 

Disabled Persons: 

See also Vocational Rehabilitation. 
Canada 

A Niche of Usefulness — booklet issued by 
Women's Bureau, Department of Labour, 
describes how handicapped women can help 
themselves, 634. 

Disabled Persons Allowances: 

Canada 

statistics, 110, 438, 752, 1139. 

Discrimination: 

Canada 

all NHA insured loans to have anti-dis- 
crimination condition, 14. 

Ontario 

views expressed by OFL, 451. 

Quebec 

views expressed by QFL, 448. 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Public Accommodation Practices Act: regula- 
tions, 1099. 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — III 
Part 3 — Anti-Discrimination Laws, 140, 142. 
Ontario 
Fair Accommodation Practices Act: amend- 
ment, 574; regulation, 1100. 

Dominion Atlantic Railway Company: 
BLFE 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; C.B. appointed, 
921; C.B. fully constituted, 1040. 

Dominion Coal Board: 

See Coal Mining. 
Dominion Coal Company Limited: 
SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers: received, 154; rejected, 
470. 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation Limited: 

CERT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 

- marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 

rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 



INDEX 



XVII 



Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Limited: — Cone. 

MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers (Dominion Shipping 
Division), Montreal: received, 1149. 

NAME 
certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers: representation vote, 
470; rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers received, 44; represen- 
tation vote, 470; rejected, 915; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

dispute: (employees. Dominion Shipping Di- 
vision, Montreal): CO. appointed, 921; C.B. 
appointed, 1271. 

Dowd, Norman S.: 

See Canadian Labour Congress. 



E 



Eagle Transportation Company Limited: 
SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers: received, 1037. 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of unlicensed personnel: received, 1037. 

Earnings: 

See Wages and Salaries. 
East-West Transport Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 979 on be- 
half of a unit of employees (Winnipeg 
Terminal): received, 1269. 

dispute with Local 605: CO. appointed, 921; 
settlement, 1271. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited: 
BRSC 

dispute with Local 264: settlement, 257. 
ILA 

certification application by Local 1654 (form- 
erly International Brotherhood of Long- 
shoremen, Local 1817): request for review 
of decision, 472; granted, 567. 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 
798, 803; strike action after Board pro- 
cedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. 
fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 



Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company 
Limited: — Cone. 

USWA 

certification application by Local 5197 on be- 
half of a unit of longshoremen: received, 796; 
granted, 913. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company (repre- 
sented by the Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Eastern Telephone and Telegraph Company: 
IBEW 

certification application by Local 2096 on be- 
half of testers and utility men employed at 
Sydney Mines and Hardwood Hill, N.S., 
Spruce Lake, N.B. and Clarenville, Nfld.: 
received, 673; granted, 795. 

Eastern Transport Limited: 

Association of Employees of Asbestos 
and Eastern Transport Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees operating in and out of As- 
bestos, Montreal, Quebec City, Victoriaville 
and Sherbrooke, Que., and Toronto, Ont.: 
received, 674; rejected, 915. 
JBT 

certification application by Locals 938 and 
106 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
ceived, 369. 

Economic Development: 

Canada 

"Diagnosis of Canada's Economic Ills" — dis- 
cussion at meeting of CCC, 1110. 

Minister of Trade and Commerce issues re- 
view of Canada's economy in 1960 and 
outlook for 1961, 13. 

Ontario 

views expressed by OFL, 449. 
United States 

suggestions of AFL-CIO Economic Policy Com- 
mittee for economic recovery, 454. 

Economic Stevedoring Corporation of Mont- 
real, Ltd. (represented by Shipping Federa- 
tion of Canada, Inc.): 
ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on 
behalf of a unit of shed employees: received. 
1269. 

Education: 

See also Manpower Utilization. 
Canada 

no hope of lasting employment for those 

with little education — CMA President, 872. 
views expressed by IRB, 234. 
continuing education for women, 35. 



xvra 



INDEX 



Education: — Cone. 

Ontario 

views expressed by OFL, 450. 

Laws and Regulations 
Canada 
legislation dealing with training and education 
to promote the training of more skilled 
workers, enacted in 1961, 1096. 
Quebec 
Education Act: amendment, 1099. 
Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited: 

UMWA 
dispute with Local 13173: CO. appointed, 797; 
settlement, 797. 

Electric Inspection: 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Electrical Energy Inspection Act: regulations, 
270. 

Manitoba 
Hydro Act: regulations, 824. 
Saskatchewan 
Electrical Inspection and Licensing Act: 
amendments, 1237. 

Electrical Installations: 

Laws and Regulations 

Quebec 
Electricians' and Electrical Installations Act: 
amendments, 164. 

Electrical Protection: 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 
Electrical Protection Act: amendment, 60. 
Electrical Trades Union (Great Britain): 

recommendation by TUC General Council for 
expulsion of ETU, passed, 1116. 

Elevators: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — IV — 
Part 5 — Industrial Safety and Health — ele- 
vators and lifts legislation, 245. 
New Brunswick 
Elevators and Lifts Act: enforcement, 482. 

Nova Scotia 
Elevators and Lifts Act: amendments, 1233. 

Ontario 
Construction Hoists Act: regulations, 1232. 
Elevators and Lifts Act: regulations, 272; 
recommendations of Royal Commission on 
Industrial Safety, 1241. 
Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: recom- 
mendations of Royal Commission on In- 
dustrial Safety re grain elevator regula- 
tions, 1243. 



Elevators: — Cone. 

Laws and Regulations — Cone. 

Saskatchewan 
Passenger and Freight Elevator Act: regula- 
tions, 60. 

Empire Freightways Limited: 

IBT 

certification application by Local 979 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 1269; 
withdrawn, 1269. 

Empire Stevedoring Company Limited: 

ILWU 

certification application by Local 501 on be- 
half of a unit of dock machine operators 
employed on CPR Dock at Vancouver: re- 
ceived, 672; granted, 794. 

Empire Stevedoring Company Limited (repre- 
sented by the Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Employment: 

48th annual meeting of the International Asso- 
ciation of Personnel in Employment, 892. 

Canada 

Employment Review: monthly summary of 
employment and unemployment; regional 
summaries; Current Labour Statistics; Col- 
lective Bargaining Review (monthly feature). 

Employment in Canada in 1960 — wages and 
working conditions; regional employment 
conditions, 114. 

national business conference on employment 
sponsored by Winnipeg Chamber of Com- 
merce and Canadian Chamber of Commerce, 
137. 

no hope of lasting employment for those with 
little education— CMA President, 872. 

United Kingdom 

Employment Trends in Great Britain 1950- 

1960, 889. 
statistics, 659. 

United States 
employment and unemployment show increase 

in June, 753. 
Employment Service urged to increase effec- 
tiveness, 439. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — 

notice on termination of employment, 31. 

Statistics 

Canada 
"Labour Statistics: C-Employment, Hours and 
Earnings" (monthly feature). 



INDEX 



XIX 



Employment Agencies: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^private 
employment agencies, 33. 
Manitoba 
Employment Services Act: regulations, 572. 

Ontario 
Employment Agencies Act: regulations, 385. 

Employment Conditions: 

See Labour Conditions. 

Employment Opportunities: 

See also Manpower Utilization. 

Canada 

summer employment opportunities for under- 
graduates, scarce, 581. 

to increase job opportunities, seek business 
abroad, says CCA President Jack M. Soules, 
112. 

United Kingdom 

TUC economic department report agrees 
workers must leave declining industries for 
expanding ones, 1209. 

United States 

President's Committee on Equal Employment 
Opportunity, 484. 

Employment Service: 

See Employment Agencies; National Em- 
ployment Service, 
Energy: 

See Fuel; Gas, Natural; Oil. 

Engine Operators: 

See Boilers. 

Engineers: 

See also Boilers. 

Canada 

Engineering and Scientific Manpower Resources 
in Canada: Their Employment, Earnings and 
Salary Rates, 1960-61, 1211. 

engineering and scientific salaries in 1961: pre- 
liminary survey, 662. 

forecast of employment issued in report of 
Department of Labour — Employment Out- 
look for Professional Personnel in Scientific 
and Technical Fields, 1960-62, 112. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^V — 
Industrial Safety and Health, Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel, and Operating Engineers 
Legislation, 357. 

New Brunswick 
Stationary Engineers Act: amendments, 1235. 

Ontario 
Operating Engineers Act: recommendation of 
Royal Commission on Industrial Safety, 
1243. 



Equal Pay for Equal Work: 

civil servants and teachers in United Kingdom 
and Canada, 466. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^III — 
Equal Pay, 143. 

New Brunswick 

Female Employees Fair Remuneration Act: 
regulations, 1015. 

European Atomic Energy Community: 

ILO and Euratom sign agreement on protection 
against radiation, 15 L 

Excavations: 

Laws and Regulations 

Ontario 

Trench Excavators Protection Act: recom- 
mendation of Royal Commission on In- 
dustrial Safety, 1243. 

Explosives: 

Laws and Regulations 

Newfoundland 

Fire Prevention Act (1954): Explosive and 
Inflammable Substances and Materials Regu- 
lations (1961): 382. 

Export Packers: 

JBT 

certification application by Local 938 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: rejected, 153. 

Exports: 

Canada 

views expressed by CLC, 225. 



Factories: 

United Kingdom 

annual report of Chief Inspector of Factories, 
165. 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 
Factories Act: regulations, 60. 

British Columbia 
Factories Act: regulation, 1156. 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — IV — 
Part 5 — Industrial Safety and Health — fac- 
tories legislation, 243. 

New Brunswick 

Factories Act: amendment, 482. 



XX 



INDEX 



Factories: — Cone. 

Laws and Regulations — Cone. 

Ontario 

Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: recom- 
mendations of Royal Commission on In- 
dustrial Safety, 1242. 

Fair Accommodation Practices: 

See Discrimination. 

Fair Employment Practices: 

See Discrimination. 
Fair Wages: 

See also Labour Conditions. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Deeade — ^11 — 

Part 1 — Labour Standards — fair wages, 32. 

Manitoba 

Fair Wage Act: regulations, 696. 

New Brunswick 
Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act: amend- 
ment, 1015. 

Family Allowances: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Family Allowances Act (1944): provisions, 29. 
Farm Homes: 

Canada 
occupations of farm daughters — Department of 
Agriculture survey, 780. 

Farm Income: 

See Income. 
Federal Commerce and Navigation Company 
Limited: 

SIU 

dispute: CO. appointed, 472; C.B. appointed, 
675; C.B. fully constituted, 797. 

Fire Prevention: 

Laws and Regulations 

Manitoba 
Fires Prevention Act: amendments, 1236. 

Newfoundland 
Fire Prevention Act (1954): regulations, 164, 

382. 

Fleet Express Lines Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 938 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 568; 
rejected, 795. 

Foley Stevedoring Company (represented by 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.): 
ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 



Foreign Trade: 

See Trade. 
Foremost Marine Transporters Limited: 
CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees (marine engineers): rejected, 
470. 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees (unlicensed personnel): re- 
jected, 470. 

Foundation Maritime Limited: 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of unlicensed personnel employed aboard 
tugboats: rejected, 255. 

SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of unlicensed personnel employed aboard 
tugboats: received, 43; rejected, 255. 

Frontenac Broadcasting Corporation Limited: 

lATSE 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees (CKWS-TV, Kingston): re- 
ceived, 368; granted, 566. 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1040; C.B. appointed, 
1271. 

Fuel: 

Laws and Regulations 

Ontario 

Energy Act: amendments, 482, 1237, 1279; 
regulations, 272, 697. 

Fumess, Withy and Company Limited (repre- 
sented by the Shipping Federation of Canada, 
Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 



Gas, Natural: 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 
Gas Protection Act: regulation, 943. 
British Columbia 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Act: regulations, 
1156. 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — In- 
dustrial Safety -and Health, 460. 
Public Lands Grants Act: regulations, 943. 
Territorial Lands Act: regulations, 943. 



INDEX 



XXI 



Gas, Natural: — Cone. 

Laws and Regulations — Cone. 

Ontario 
Energy Aet: amendments, 1237, 1279; regula- 
tions, 272, 697. 

Saskatchewan 
Gas Inspeetion and Licensing Aet: amend- 
ment, 164. 

Gaspe Shipping Registered: 

BRSC 

certifieation application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 1269. 

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade: 

CLC executive council proposes new role for 
GATT that would provide method for meet- 
ing import competition from countries main- 
taining low wages and unfair labour stand- 
ards, 1210. 

General Enterprises Limited: 

VBCJA 

certification application by Local 2499 on be- 
half of a unit of carpenters: received, 1149. 

Gill Interprovincial Lines Limited: 

IBT 

dispute with Local 605: CO. appointed, 1150. 

Goldberg, Arthur J., United States Secretary of 
Labor: 

appointment, 15. 

visits Hon. Michael Starr, federal Minister of 
Labour, 1135. 

J. A. Gormley (Stevedoring Service): 
LPV 

dispute: CO. appointed, 921. 

Grain Elevators: 

See Elevators. 
Gross National Product: 

See National Product. 
Gulf Islands Navigation Limited: 

SIJJ 
dispute: lapsed, 675. 



H 



Hall Corporation of Canada: 

MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1149. 

ISAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

54609-3—4 



Hall Corporation of Canada: — Cone. 

SIV 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 469; rejected, 915; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Hamilton Harbour Commissioners: 
ILA 

dispute: CB. appointed, 45. 

Hamilton Shipping Company Limited: 
ILA 

certification application by Local 1654 (for- 
merly International Brotherhood of Long- 
shoremen, Local 1817): request for review 
of decision, 472; granted, 566. 

dispute with Local 1654: CO. appointed, 257; 
CB. appointed, 472; CB. fully constituted, 
473; CB. report 798, 803; strike action after 
Board procedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

Hamilton Terminal Operators Limited: 
ILA 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 256; granted, 368. 

dispute with Local 1879: CO. appointed, 472; 
settlement, 1040. 

Harbour Development Limited: 
SIV 

dispute: CO. appointed, 568; settlement, 674. 

Haythome, Dr. George V., Deputy Minister 
of Labour: 

appointment, 213. 

Health: 

Canada 

views expressed by IRB, 235, 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Health Act: amendment, 163. 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — V — 
Industrial Safety and Health — Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel, and Operating Engineers 
Legislation 242, 357; Occupational Health 
Hazards, 464. 
legislation in 1961, 1232. 

Quebec 
Public Health Act: amendments, 698. 

Health Insurance: 

See Insurance, Health. 

Health Services: 

See Medical Services. 



xxn 



INDEX 



Hector Broadcasting Company Limited: 
lATSE 

certification application by Local 848 on be- 
half of a unit of employees at Radio Station 
CKEC, New Glasgow, N.S.: received, 915; 
representation vote, 1035; granted, 1147. 

Highways: 

See Transportation. 
Hill the Mover (Canada) Limited: 
IBT 

dispute with Local 885: (employees, Victoria 
Terminal): CO. appointed, 569; lapsed, 
1175. 

Hoists: 

See Elevators. 

Holden Sand and Gravel Limited: 
SW 

dispute: settlement, 155. 

Holidays: 

See Vacations. 

Hospitalization Insurance: 

See Insurance, Hospitalization. 

Hospitals: 

Nova Scotia 

views expressed by Federation of Labour re 
hospital employees, 1252. 

Hours of Work: 

Canada 

two million man-hours of work from Defence 
jobs December 1 to March 31, 14. 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 
Labour Act: new order, 693. 

British Columbia 
Hours of Work Act: regulations, 163, 958. 

New Brunswick 
Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act: amend- 
ment, 1015. 

Newfoundland 
Exploits Valley (Closing Hours) Shop Act: 
amendment, 1018. 

Saskatchewan 
Hours of Work Act: regulation, 958. 

United States 
Fair Labor Standards Act: regulation, 701. 
Housing: 

text of ILO recommendation concerning work- 
ers' housing, 788. 

Canada 

starts and completions in 1960, 109. 



Housing: — Cone. 

United States 

unique collective agreement cuts housing costs, 
634. 

Laws and Regulations 
Canada 
all NHA insured loans to have anti-discrimina- 
tion condition, 14. 

Hull City Transport Employees' Union: 
Hull City Transport Limited 

certification application by Local 591 on behalf 
of a unit of bus drivers and garage em- 
ployees: request for consent under Section 
7 (4) denied, 672. 

dispute: settlement, 155; report of Board, 155. 

Hull Metropolitan Transport Limited 

certification application by Local 591 on behalf 
of a unit of bus drivers and garage em- 
ployees: request for consent under Section 7 
(4) denied, 672. 

Hull City Transport Limited: 

AASERE 

certification application by Local 591 on behalf 
of a unit of bus drivers and garage em- 
ployees: received, 470; request for consent 
under Section 7 (14) denied, 672. 

HCTEU 

certification application by Local 591 on behalf 
of a unit of bus drivers and garage em- 
ployees: request for consent under Section 
7 (4) denied, 672. 

dispute: settlement, 155; report of Board, 155. 

Hull Metropolitan Transport Limited: 
AASERE 

certification application by Local 591 on behalf 
of a unit of bus drivers and garage em- 
ployees: received, 470; request for consent 
under Section 7 (4) denied, 672. 

HCTEU 

certification application by Local 591 on behalf 
of a unit of bus drivers and garage em- 
ployees: request for consent under Section 
7 (4) denied, 672. 

Hutchinson, A. A.: 

See International Railway Brotherhoods. 



Immigration — Emigration: 
Canada 

statistics, 1109. 

admission to Canada of Japanese essential to 
industries, 1138. 



INDEX 



xxin 



Immigration — Emigration: — Cone. 
Canada — Cone. 

decrease in number of immigrants to Canada 

in 1960, 633. 
number of immigrants drops in first quarter of 

1961, 633. 
number of immigrants in 1960 slightly smaller 

than in 1959, 109. 
views expressed by IRB, 234. 
Imports: 

Canada 
commodity imports in 1960 down fractionally 

from 1959, 437. 
downward trend in commodity imports during 

third quarter of 1960, 76. 
views expressed by CLC, 225. 
Income: 

Canada 
farm cash income in 1960, 109, 397. 
Income Tax: 

Canada 
views expressed by IRB, 235. 
Industrial Disputes: 

See Labour Disputes. 
Industrial Relations: 
See also Labour Laws and Regulations; 
Labour-Management Co-operation; Labour 
Unions — Legal Decisions; Laval Univer- 
sity — Industrial Relations Department; 
McGill University — Industrial Relations 
Centre. 
Canada and United States to share views on 
labour problems — meeting of Hon. Michael 
Starr, Canadian Minister of Labour and 
Arthur J. Goldberg, U.S. Secretary of Labor, 
541. 
encyclical letter by Pope John XXIII on social 

problems of the modern world, 887. 
Industrial Relations Seventy Years After Rerum 
Nov arum, 555. 

Canada 

Labour Arbitration in Canada — summary of 
book by Prof. A. W. R. Carrothers, Univer- 
sity of British Columbia, 1216. 

Ninth Annual Catholic Social Life Conference, 
1101. 

Ontario 

Labour Relations Act: views expressed by 
OFL, 449. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^VIII — 

Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 

Legislation, 769. 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — IX — 

Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 

Legislation, 893. 

54609-3— 4i 



Industrial Relations: — Cone. 
Laws and Regulations — Cone. 

Labour Relations Legislation in Canada, 1950- 
1960: Legislation in effect in 1950, with 
date of enactment; Amendments in period 
1950-60, with citation in 1960, 770. 
labour relations legislation in 1961, 1225. 

Manitoba 
Department of Labour Act: amendments, 1230. 

New Brunswick 
Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1230. 

Ontario 
Labour Relations Act: regulations, 272, 386. 

Prince Edward Island 
Trade Union Act: amendments, 1231. 
Industrial Safety: 

See Safety, Industrial. 
Industrial Standards: 

Laws and Regulations 
Ontario 
Industrial Standards Act: regulations, 1279. 
Industrial Transportation: 

See Transportation. 
Industry: 

See Professional Association of Industrialists. 
Injunctions, Labour: 

Legal Decisions 
B.C. Court of Appeal dissolves injunction re- 
straining employer from discharging em- 
ployees under closed shop agreement, 268. 
B.C. Supreme Court rules picketing may be 
restrained when strike illegal and obstruction 
occurs; upholds injunction, 376. 
Ont. High Court makes distinction between 
"interlocutory" and "interim" injunction 
under Ontario Judicature Act, 688. 

Insurance, Health: 

Canada 

1950-51 Canadian Sickness Survey indicated 
more than one-half of population had health 
insurance, 1139. 

views expressed by IRB, 234. 

Saskatchetvan 

provincial medical care plan responsible to the 
people recommended by Federation of 
Labour, 1250. 

Insurance, Hospitalization: 

Laws and Regulations 

Quebec 
Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services 
Act: provisions extended to residents of 
province of Quebec, 15. 

International Affairs: 

views expressed by CLC, 226. 



XXIV 



INDEX 



International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees and Moving Picture Machine Op- 
erators of the United States and Canada: 

Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting 
Limited 

certification application by Local 873 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 256; 
granted, 566. 

Canadian Marconi Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 
1037; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1148; request for special leave (Rule 8) 
denied, 1149. 

Frontenac Broadcasting Corporation 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (CKWS-TV, Kingston): received, 
368; granted, 566. 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1040; C.B. appointed, 
1271. 

Hector Broadcasting Company 
Limited 

certification application by Local 848 on behalf 
of a unit of employees at Radio Station 
CKEC, New Glasgow, N.S.: received, 915; 
representation vote, 1035; granted, 1147. 

Vantel Broadcasting Company 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees in Design and Film Depart- 
ments at CHAN-TV, Vancouver: received, 
568; granted, 794. 

International Association of Machinists: 

Canada 

George P. Schollie, Canadian Vice-President, 

retires. 111. 
Michael Rygus elected General Vice-President 

for Canada, 635. 

United States 

plant closing imminent, workers at American 
Can Company accept pay-cut, 1271. 

Consolidated Aviation Fueling 
Services Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
fueling service personnel employed at Mont- 
real International Airport, Dorval: received, 
796; granted, 913; application for revocation 
received, 1150. 

Northern Wings Limited 

dispute: settlement, 45. 

Pacific Western Airlines Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 155; settlement, 369. 



International Association of 
Machinists: — Cone. 

Quebec North Shore and Labrador 
Railway Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 

employees in Catering Department: received, 

1269. 
certification application on behalf of a unit of 

employees in Freight Department: received, 

256; granted, 566. 

Seaboard and Western Airlines Inc. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
aircraft maintenance and fleet service em- 
ployees: received, 368; withdrawn, 471. 

TransAir Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; settlement, 472. 
Trans-Canada Air Lines 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
cafeteria employees at Montreal airport: 
received, 153; granted, 255. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
lead production planners, production plan- 
ners, production forecasters and parts 
routers: granted, 1147; received, 1149. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
planners employed at Overhaul Base at 
Montreal International Airport, Dorval: 
received, 916; withdrawn, 1150. 

International Association of Personnel in Em- 
ployment Security: 

meeting, 48th, 892. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical Work- 
ers: 

Eastern Telephone and Telegraph 
Company 

certification application by Local 2096 on be- 
half of testers and utility men employed at 
Sydney Mines and Hardwood Hill, N.S.; 
Spruce Lake, N.B. and Clarenville, Nfld.: 
received, 673; granted, 795. 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America: 

James R. Hoffa re-elected President, 639. 

Leslie Armstrong Mail Service 

certification application by Local 879 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: representation vote, 
43; rejected, 153. 

Asbestos Eastern Limited 

certification application by Locals 938 and 
106 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
ceived, 369. 

Asbestos Transport Limited 

certification application by Locals 938 and 
106 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
ceived, 369; rejected, 672. 



INDEX 



XXV 



International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America: — Cont. 

Atomic Transfer Limited 

certification application by Local 979 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 915; 
withdrawn, 1037. 

H.W, Bacon Litnited 

dispute with Local 419: CO. appointed, 796; 
C.B. appointed, 1040; C.B. fully constituted, 
1151. 

BarnhiWs Transfer Limited 

dispute with Locals 76 and 927: settlement, 45. 

dispute with Locals 76 and 927: CO. ap- 
pointed, 921; C.B. appointed, 1040; C.B. 
fully constituted, 1151. 

John N, Brocklesby Transport Limited 

certification application by Local 419 on behalf 
of a unit of float drivers: received, 1037; 
granted, 1147. 

Central Truck Lines Limited 

certification application by Locals 106 and 938 
on behalf of a unit of employees: received, 
796; representation vote, 913; granted, 1035. 

East-West Transport Limited 

certification application by Local 979 on behalf 
of a unit of employees (Winnipeg Terminal) : 
received, 1269. 

dispute with Local 605: CO. appointed, 921; 
settlement, 1271. 

Eastern Transport Limited 

certification application by Locals 938 and 
106 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
ceived, 369. 

Empire Freightways Limited 

certification application by Local 979 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 1269; 
withdrawn, 1269. 

Export Packers 

certification application by Local 938 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: rejected, 153. 

Fleet Express Lines Limited 

certification application by Local 938 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 568; 
rejected, 795. 

Gill Interprovincial Lines Limited 

dispute with Local 605: CO. appointed, 1150. 
Hill the Mover (Canada) Limited 

dispute with Local 885; (employees, Victoria 
Terminal): CO. appointed, 569; lapsed, 
1175. 

MacCosham Van Lines Limited 

certification application by Local 938 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 796; 
granted, 913. 



International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America: — Cont. 

MacGregor The Mover Limited 

certification application by Local 91 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 1269. 
McCahe Grain Company Limited 
dispute with Local 514: C.B. appointed, 472; 
CB. fully constituted, 473. 
Middup Moving and Storage Limited 
certification application by Local 519 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 673; 
granted, 795. 

Moloughney^s Van and Storage Limited 
certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees: representation vote, 255; re- 
jected, 368. 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations 

Bureau (representing certain companies 

within Federal jurisdiction) 

dispute with Local 106: CO. appointed, 1271. 

dispute with Local 880: CO. appointed, 921; 

CB. appointed, 1151; C.B. fully constituted, 

1151. 

Wm. C. Norris Limited 

certification application by Local 106 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 154; 
granted, 255. 

North American Van Lines 
(Atlantic) Limited 

certification application by Local 927 on be- 
half of a unit of drivers, packers, craters 
and helpers: received, 915; granted, 1147. 
Ottawa Pre-Mixed Concrete Limited 

certification application by Local 230: re- 
jected, 43. 

Overnite Express Limited 

certification application by Locals 106 and 938 
on behalf of a unit of employees working in 
and out of Montreal, St. Jerome and Hull, 
Que., and Toronto, Ont.: received, 796; 
withdrawn, 1037. 

Sabre Freight Lines Limited 
dispute with Local 605: CO. appointed, 1150. 
St. John^s (Iberville) Transport 
Company Limited 
certification application by Local 106 and 938 
on behalf of a unit of employees at Iber- 
ville, Que. and Toronto, Ont.: received, 369, 
568; withdrawn, 568; granted, 794. 
D, S, Scott Transport 
dispute with Local 605 on behalf of a unit 
of employees at Vancouver Terminal: 
lapsed, 675. 

/• Sherman and Sons Limited 

dispute with Local 880: lapsed, 675. 



XXVI 



INDEX 



International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America: — Cent. 

John A, Snow 

certification application by Local 419 on be- 
half of a unit of mail pick-up and delivery 
drivers: received, 43; granted, 153. 
Tank Truck Transport Limited 

certification application by Locals 880 and 
938 on behalf of a unit of employees: re- 
jected, 153. 

dispute with Locals 880 and 938: lapsed, 675. 
Vancouver Alberta Freightlines Limited 

certification application by Local 605 and 
Local 514 on behalf of a unit of drivers, 
mechanics and warehousemen: received, 
672; withdrawn, 796. 

White Pass and Yukon Route 

certification application by Local 605 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 1149; 
withdrawn, 1269. 

International Institute for Labour Studies: 

members, etc., 366. 

first study course at ILO's Institute, 1 144. 

Sir Douglas Berry Copland appointed first 
Director of ILO body, 41. 

International Labour Organization: 

Arthur H. Brown, former federal Deputy 
Minister of Labour, becomes Director of 
Canada Branch, 12. 

International Institute for Labour Studies — 
Sir Douglas Berry Copland appointed first 
Director, 41; members, etc., 366; first study 
course, 1144. 

ILO and Euratom sign agreement on protec- 
tion against radiation, 151. 

investment in training and education urgently 
needed for world peace — address of David A. 
Morse, Director, to international congress 
marking 80th anniversary of the Organiza- 
tion for Rehabilitation through Training, 37. 

David A. Morse, Director-General of the 
International Labour Office, resigns, 1264. 

Niger Republic becomes 97th ILO member 
country, 1145. 

report on the trade union situation in Sweden, 
1265; in the U.S.S.R., 39, in the United King- 
dom, 1031; in the United States, 38. 

seven new African republics join DLO, 40. 

study conference on labour-management rela- 
tions — Canadian delegation; agenda, 40. 

Tripartite Technical Meeting to consider social 
consequences of the coal crisis, 150. 
General Conference 

Session, 45th, 782. 

Governing Body- 
Session, 147th, 41. 

Session, 148th, 365. 

Session, 149th, 1145. 



International Labour Organization: — Cone. 
Inland Transport Committee 

Session, 7th, 667. 

Joint Maritime Commission 

Session, 19th, 1145. 

Membership 

re-admission of Syrian Arab Republic in- 
creases ILO membership to 101, 1267. 

Publications and Reports 

The Cost of Social Security 1949-1957, 669. 
International Ladies' Garment Workers Union: 

New York city coat-and-suit industry wins 
improved welfare benefits, 473. 

study cites rise in Canada's union membership, 
569. 

International Longshoremen's and Warehouse- 
men's Union: 

Canadian Stevedoring Company Limited 

certification application by Local 501 on be- 
half of a unit of employees classified as 
checkers, mechanics, drivers, shedmen and 
janitors at Terminal Dock at Vancouver: re- 
ceived, 672; granted, 794. 
Empire Stevedoring Company Limited 

certification application by Local 501 on be- 
half of a unit of dock machine operators 
employed on CPR Dock at Vancouver: re- 
ceived, 672; granted, 794. 
Overseas Transport Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of unlicensed employees: received, 1037; 
withdrawn, 1150. 
Pacific Stevedoring and Contracting 
Company Limited 

dispute with Local 505: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1271. 
Shipping Federation of British Columbia 

dispute with Locals 506, 507 and 510: settle- 
ment, 369. 

Tahsis Company Limited 

certification application by Local 503 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: rejected, 368; 
request for review of decision, 471; denied, 
567. 
Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited 

dispute with Local 512: settlement, 155. 
Vancouver Wharves Limited 

certification application by Local 512 on be- 
half of a unit of employees employed at 
the Company's operation at North Van- 
couver in the handling and warehousing of 
cargo and in the maintenance of plant 
equipment: granted, 43. 

dispute with Local 512: CO. appointed, 568; 
settlement, 674. 



INDEX 



xxvn 



International Longshoremen's Association: 
Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 
certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Brown and Ryan Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 
certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Caledon Terminals Limited 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 
798, 803; strike after board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. 
fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

Canadian National Railways (North 
Sydney, N.S.) 

dispute with Local 1259: CO. appointed, 1150; 
settlement, 1271. 

Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 
certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

5am Chados 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 
798, 803; strike after board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. 
fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922, 
settlement, 1041. 



International Longshoremen's Association: — 

Cont. 

Cunard Steamship Company Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company 
Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company 
Limited 

certification application by Local 1654 (for- 
merly International Brotherhood of Long- 
shoremen, Local 1817): request for review 
of decision, 472; granted, 567. 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 
798, 803; strike action after Board pro- 
cedure, 922; settlement, 1041, 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. 
fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

Economic Stevedoring Corporation of 
Montreal, Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Empire Stevedoring Company Limited 

(represented by the Shipping 
Federation of Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Foley Stevedoring Company 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Furness, Withy and Company Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

Hamilton Harbour Commissioners 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 45. 



xxvm 



INDEX 



International Longshoremen's Association: — 

Cent. 

Hamilton Shipping Company Limited 

certification application by Local 1654 (for- 
merly International Brotherhood of Long- 
shoremen, Local 1817): request for review 
of decision, 472; granted, 566. 

dispute with Local 1654: CO. appointed, 257; 
C.B. appointed, 472; C.B, fully constituted, 
473; C.B. report, 798, 803; strike action 
after Board procedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

Hamilton Terminal Operators Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 256; granted, 368. 

dispute with Local 1879: CO. appointed, 472; 
settlement, 1040. 

/. C, Malone and Company (1959) Limited 

dispute with Local 1846: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1271. 

McLean Kennedy, Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 
certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Montreal and St, John Stevedoring 
Company Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 
Canada, Inc.) 
certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Pittston Stevedoring Corporation 
of Canada 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; CB. fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 
798, 803; strike action after Board pro- 
cedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; CB. appointed, 369; CB. 
fully constituted, 473; CB. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

Seaway Forwarding Agencies Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: request for review of decision, 
471. 

dispute with Local 1854: CO. appointed, 257; 
settlement, 797. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc, 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

dispute with Local 375: CO. appointed, 472; 
CB. appointed, 569; C.B. fully constituted, 
675; CB. report, 922; settlement, 922. 

dispute with Local 1552: CO. appointed, 569; 
settlement, 674. 



International Longshoremen's Association: — 

Cone. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc, — Conc. 

dispute with Local 1657 (checkers and cargo 
repairmen): CO. appointed, 797; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 1151; C.B. fully constituted, 1271. 

Three Rivers Shipping Company Limited 

dispute with Local 1846: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1271. 

Wolfe Stevedores Limited 

(represented by Shipping Federation of 

Canada, Inc.) 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 

of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Yorkwood Shipping and Trading Company 

Limited 

certification application by Local 1654 (for- 
merly International Brotherhood of Long- 
shoremen, Local 1817): request for review 
of decision, 472; granted, 566. 

dispute with Local 1654: CO. appointed, 257; 
C.B. appointed, 472; C.B. fully constituted, 
473; CB. report, 798, 803; strike action 
after Board procedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

International Railway Brotherhoods: 

National Legislative Committee 

brief to federal Cabinet, 223, 233. 

Labour Day message of Chairman, A. A. 

Hutchinson, 759. 
New Year message of chairman, A. A. 

Hutchinson, 1263. 

International Trade Secretariats: 

new edition issued by U.S. Department of 
Labour, 753. 

International Union of Electrical Workers: 

Northland Utilities Limited 

certification application by Local 424: received, 
45; withdrawn, 674. 

Northland Utilities (B.C) Limited 

certification application by Local 424; received, 
45; withdrawn, 674. 

Uranium City Power Company Limited 

certification application by Local 424; re- 
ceived, 45; withdrawn, 674. 

International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers: 

Boyles Bros, Drilling (Alberta) Limited 

dispute with Local 1005: CO. appointed, 674; 
settlement, 797. 

Boyles Bros, Drilling Company Limited 

certification application by Local 1005 on be- 
half of a unit of employees employed in 
Yukon Territory, 567; withdrawn, 568. 



INDEX 



XXIX 



International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers: — Cone. 

Canada Tungsten Mining Corporation 
Limited 

certification application by Local 1031 on be- 
half of a unit of strip miners in Flat Creek 
area of NWT: received, 915; granted 1035. 

United Keno Hill Mines Limited 

dispute with Local 924: CO. appointed, 796; 
settlement, 921. 

International Union of Operating Engineers: 
Canadian Arsenals Limited 
(Gun Ammunition Division) 

dispute with Local 796: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1150. 

United Grain Growers Terminals, Limited 

certification application by Local 882: request 
for review of decision received, 1038. 

International Union, United Automobile, Air- 
craft and Agricultural Implement Workers 
of America: 

See United Automobile Workers. 

International Woodworkers of America: 

Tahsis Company Limited 

certification application by Local 1-85 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: rejected, 368; re- 
quest for review decision, 471; denied, 567. 

Island Fertilizers Inc.: 

LPU 

dispute with No. 9568: settlement, 45. 

Island Shipping Limited: 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel employed aboard the 
Wheat King and the Northern Venture: re- 
ceived, 915; representation vote, 1035; 
granted, 1147. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel employed aboard the 
Wheat King and the Northern Venture: 
representation vote, 1035; rejected, 1148. 



Japan: 

admission to Canada of Japanese essential to 
industries, 1138. 

Jodoin, Claude: 

See Canadian Labour Congress — President. 



Jurisdictional Disputes: 

Manitoba 

establishment by CLC of court to rule on 
jurisdictional dispute recommended by Fed- 
eration of Labour, 1248. 

Saskatchewan 

Association of Civil Servants withdraws from 
membership in Federation of Labour be- 
cause of dispute with NUPSE, 1251. 



K 



Kingcome Navigation Company Limited: 
CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees: rejected, 43. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of employees: rejected, 43. 

Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Company 
Limited (Radio Station CKCR): 

NABET 

dispute: settlement, 45. 

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines: 
UAW 

certification application on behalf of a unit 

of office employees: received, 1037. 
dispute: CO. appointed, 797; settlement, 921. 



La Verendrye Line, Limited: 

NAME 
certification application on behalf of a unit of 
engineers: granted, 469. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; granted, 469. 

Labour Attaches: 

John A. Ballew retires as United States labour 

attache in Ottawa, 336. 
Louis A. Weisner appointed to United States 

Embassy at Ottawa, 336. 

Labour Code: 

See Labour Laws and Regulations. 

Labour Conditions: 

Canada 

"Labour Conditions in Federal Government 
Contracts" (monthly feature). 



XXX 



INDEX 



Labour Conditions: — Cone. 
Canada — Cone. 

Employment in Canada in 1960 — wages and 

working conditions; regional employment 

conditions, 114. 
working conditions in manufacturing (1960), 

348; plant workers, 349; office workers, 350. 
Ontario 
views expressed by OFL, 450. 
Labour Courts: 

Quebec 
jurisdiction of labour courts discussed by 

Gerard Picard at Laval University's Industrial 

Relations Conference, 553. 

Labour Day: 

Labour Day messages of labour leaders, 757. 
Labour Day message of Hon. Michael Starr, 
Minister of Labour, 755. 

Labour Department-University Research Pro- 
gram: 

Labour Arbitration in Canada — summary of 
book by Prof. A. W. R. Carrothers, Uni- 
versity of British Columbia, under the pro- 
gram, 1216, 

1961 grants announced, 633; correction, 1033. 

study on Government Supervised Strike Votes 
by Prof. E. R. Anton, University of Alberta, 
under the Program, 762. 

Labour Disputes: 

Laws and Regulations 
Canada. 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — IX — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation, 893. 

Canada 

Labour Arbitration in Canada — summary of 
book by Prof. A. W. R. Carrothers, Univer- 
sity of British Columbia, 1216. 

regional factors in industrial conflict — address 
by Prof. Stuart Jamieson to 33rd Annual 
Meeting of Canadian Political Science As- 
sociation, 878. 

Labour Force: 

Canada 

The Female Labour Force: number of women 
in the labour force; married women working 
for pay; ages of working women; occupa- 
tional distribution of women workers; part- 
time work among women workers, 563. 

United States 

as percentage of total labour force, union mem- 
bership in 1960 drops, 1211. 

Statistics 

"Labour Statistics: A-Labour Force" (monthly 

feature). 
"Labour Statistics: D-Employment Service 

Statistics" (monthly feature). 



Labour Gazette: 

change in price of official publication of 
federal Department of Labour, 1139. 

"50 Years Ago This Month" (monthly feature). 

Labour Laws and Regulations: 

See also Canadian Association of Administra- 
tors of Labour Legislation; various subject 
headings. 

Alberta 

Labour Act: new orders, 691, 692; regulations, 
944, 1046. 

British Columbia 

Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1225-28; 
regulations, 694. 

Canada 

Canada Shipping Act: regulations, 481. 
changes in 1961 provincial laws affecting 

wages, hours and vacations, 1015. 
current reports on progress of labour bills 

issued by Department of Labour, 110. 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade: 
(n) Part 1 — Labour Standards, 27; Part 2— 

Private Employment Agencies, 33. 

(III) Part 3 — Anti-Discrimination Laws, 140; 
Part 4 — Workmen's Compensation, 144. 

(IV) Part 5— Industrial Safety and Health, 
242, 357, 460. 

(V) Part 5 (cont'd) — Industrial Safety and 
Health — Boiler and Pressure Vessel, and 
Operating Engineers Legislation, 357. 

(VI) Part 5— Industrial Safety and Health, 
460. 

(VII) Part 6 — ^Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's 
Qualification, 556. 

(VIII) Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade 
Union Legislation, 769. 

(IX) Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade 
Union Legislation, 893. 

session on "Recent Changes in Labour Legis- 
lation" at meeting of CCA, 236. 

views expressed by CCA, 353. 

views expressed by CLC, 226. 
Manitoba 

Department of Labour Act: amendments, 1230. 
New Brunswick 

Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1230. 
Ontario 

Department of Labour Act: recommendations 
of Royal Commission on Industrial Safety, 
1240. 

Quebec 

Labour Legislation in Quebec: A Study in Fear, 
Freedom and Conflict: address to Canadian 
Political Science Association, 760. 

Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1228. 

proposed Canadian Labour Code published by 
Gerard Picard, OBE, President of the Cana- 
dian Federation of the Printing Industry and 
Information (CNTU), 337. 



INDEX 



XXXI 



Labour-Management Co-operation: 
Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, urges 
co-operation on labour-management prob- 
lems, 213. 

meeting of labour, management and govern- 
ment officials discusses economic problems 
contributing to unemployment, 333. 

"Teamwork in Industry" (monthly feature). 

United States 

President's Advisory Committee on Labor- 
Management Policy, 333. 

Labour-Management Relations: 

ILO study conference — Canadian delegation, 
agenda, 40. 

United States 

15 -man presidential commission to study rail- 
road work-rule dispute, 53. 

Labour Movement: 

ILO report on trade union situation in Sweden, 
1265; in the U.S.S.R., 39; in the United 
Kingdom, 1301; in the United States, 38. 

Labour Relations: 

See Industrial Relations. 
Labour Representation: 

Canada 

views expressed in IRB, 235. 
Labour Standards: 

See also General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — II — 

Part 1 — Labour Standards, 27. 
Provincial Labour Standards — December 1960 

— publication of federal Department of 

Labour, 480. 

United States 
Fair Labor Standards Act: amendment, 698. 

Labour Statistics: 

"Current Labour Statistics" (monthly feature). 

Labour Studies: 

See International Institute for Labour Studies. 

Labour Surplus: 

See Surplus Labour Areas. 

Labour Unions: 

See also Labour Movement. 

Norway 

national conference of women trade unionists, 
1261. 

Ontario 

Women's Conference of the Ontario Federa- 
tion of Labour, 1261. 



Labour Unions: — Cont. 

Sweden 

The Trade Union Situation in Sweden — report 

of ILO mission, 1265. 
women in trade unions, 1029. 

U.S,S,R, 

The Trade Union Situation in the U.S.S.R. — 
report of ILO mission, 39. 

United Kingdom 

British unions report on effects of automation 
in offices, 670. 

The Trade Union Situation in the United King- 
dom — report of ILO mission, 1031. 

United States 

The Trade Union Situation in the United 
States — report of ILO mission, 38. 

Venezuela 

President of Confederation of Labour visits 
Ottawa, 634. 

Constitution and by-laws 
Legal Decisions 

B.C. Court of Appeal allows the appeal from 
the decision of the trial court that quashed 
17 certification orders, 685. 

B.C. Court of Appeal dissolves injunction re- 
straining employer from discharging em- 
ployees under closed shop agreement, 268. 

B.C. Court of Appeal rules certiorari to quash 
Board decision should not be granted when 
applicant has committed fraud, 267. 

B.C. Supreme Court finds union, three officers 
and 16 members jointly liable for damages 
suffered by company as result of illegal 
strike, 1042. 

B.C. Court of Appeal quashes decision of 
Labour Relations Board on the ground of 
denial of substantial justice, 1152. 

B.C. Court of Appeal rules Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board decision made within its 
jurisdiction is not reviewable, 474. 

B.C. Supreme Court quashes 17 certffication 
orders applicable to areas where employers 
not at that time operating, 375. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules court cannot inter- 
fere with decision arrived at in accordance 
with union constitution, 686. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules union is legal 
entity, awards damages against it and two 
officers for preventing member from ob- 
taining employment, 570. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules picketing may be 
restrained when strike illegal and obstruc- 
tion occurs; upholds injunction, 376. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules that if picketing is 
to persuade it can be enjoined in the absence 
of a strike, 821. 



XXXII 



INDEX 



Labour Unions: — Cent. 

Constitution and by-laws 
Legal decisions — Cent. 

Man. Court of Appeal upholds ruling that 
buyer of bankrupt business not bound by an 
existing collective agreement, 477. 

Man. Court of Queen's Bench rules that 
Labour Relations Act makes a union a legal 
entity that is liable for damages, 818. 

Man. Court of Queen's Bench holds purchaser 
of assets of bankrupt business not bound by 
the existing collective agreement, 158. 

Man. Court of Queen's Bench denies jurisdic- 
tion of Labour Relations Board to conduct 
representation vote on decertification, 56. 

N.B. Supreme Court (Appeal Division) quashes 
arbitration award because arbitrators did 
not take oath prescribed by Arbitration Act, 
689. 

N.B. Supreme Court quashes certification order 
because there were no employees in bargain- 
ing unit when order made, 269. 

Nfld. Supreme Court remits arbitration award 
to arbitrators for reconsideration as it al- 
tered terms of agreement, 1154. 

Ont. Court of Appeal quashes an arbitration 
award and upholds a company's right to 
retire employees at age 65, 687. 

Ont. Court of Appeal upholds ruling that arbi- 
tration board has the power to award dam- 
ages for breach of agreement, 1276. 

Ont. High Court rules court in certiorari pro- 
ceedings cannot review 3oard decision made 
on basis of credibility, 59. 

Ont. High Court makes distinction between 
"interlocutory" and "interim" injunction un- 
der Ontario Judicature Act, 688. 

Ont. High Court rules truck carrier engaged in 
interconnecting undertaking within scope of 
federal jurisdiction, 159. 

Ont. High Court rules that arbitration board 
has the power to assess damages for breach 
of collective agreement, 379. 

Que. Superior Court upholds constitutional 
validity of the 1960 amendments to the 
Quebec Labour Relations Act, 1155. 

Sask. Court of Appeal rules that members of 
Labour Relations Board, once appointed, 
cease to represent special group, 58. 

Supreme Court of Canada rules that New 
Brunswick Labour Relations Board has no 
jurisdiction over persons resident outside 
province, 265. 

Supreme Court of Canada rules owner of coin- 
operated laundry open on Sunday guilty of 
contravening Lord's Day Act, 1272. 

Supreme Court of Canada rules that peaceful 
picketing directed at causing a strike in 
violation of Labour Relations Act is an 
actionable conspiracy, 939. 



Labour Unions: — Cone. 

Constitution and by-laws 
Legal decisions — Cone. 

Supreme Court of Canada rules that a trade 
union does not have the power to order or 
enforce boycott of third party, 1274. 

Toronto Magistrate's Court upholds the right 
of an employer to discharge from employ- 
ment workers on strike legally called, 1277. 

Co-operation and federation 

British Columbia 
B.C. Government Employees' Association ap- 
proves disaffiliation with B.C. Federation of 
Labour, 16. 

Factionalism 

United Kingdom 

recommendation by TUC General Council for 
expulsion of ETU, passed, 1116. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — VIII — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation, 769. 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — IX — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation, 893; Trade Unions: Definition 
and Legal Status, 899. 

Prince Edward Island 
Trade Union Act: amendments, 1231. 

Saskatchewan 

Trade Union Act: amendments, 1231. 

Membership 

Canada 

industrial and geographic distribution of union 

membership in Canada (1960), 342. 
ILGWU study cites rise in Canada's union 

membership, 569. 
statistics, 1211. 

United States 
as percentage of total labour forces, member- 
ship in 1960 drops, 1211. 

Salaries 

salaries of union leaders in Canada and the 
United States, 875. 

Labourers Protective Union: 

Buntain Bell and Company Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 921. 

/. A. Gormley (Stevedoring Service) 
dispute: CO. appointed, 921. 

Island Fertilizers Inc. 
dispute with No. 9568: settlement, 45. 

Horace B, Willis Limited 
dispute: CO. appointed, 921. 



INDEX 



XXXIII 



Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association (Fort 
William and Port Arthur): 

BRSC 

dispute with Local 650: CO. appointed, 568; 
settlement, 674. 

Laundries 

Legal Decisions 

Canada 
Supreme Court of Canada rules owner of 
coin-operated laundry open on Sunday 
guilty of contravening Lord's Day Act, 1272. 

Laval University: 

Industrial Relations Branch 

annual industrial relations conference, 16th, 

552. 

Legal Decisions: 

See Labour Unions — Constitution and By-laws 
— Legal Decisions. 

Libraries: 

See Department of Labour — Library. 

Lifting Devices: 

See Elevators; Ski Tows. 

Lifts: 

See Elevators; Ski Tows. 

Logging: 

See Lumber and Wood Products Industry. 

Lord's Day Act: 

See Sunday Observance. 

Lumber and Wood Products Industry: 

Newfoundland 
re Royal Commission of Enquiry on the Log- 
ging Industry, 1236. 

Laws and Regulations 

Newfoundland 
Logging Camps Act: amendments, 1236: regu- 
lations, 270, 573, 697. 



M 



M & P Transport Limited: 

Association of Employees of 
M & P Transport 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
drivers and dockmen: received, 568; granted, 

794. 

MacCosham Van Lines Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 938 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 796; 
granted, 913. 



MacGregor The Mover Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 91 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 1269. 

J. C. Malone and Company (1959) Limited: 

ILA 

dispute with Local 1846; CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1271. 

Manitoba Federation of Labour: 

convention, 7th, 1248. 
Manitoba Pool Elevators: 
BRSC 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of electricians in grain elevator at Port 
Arthur: received, 154; withdrawn, 471. 

Manpower Utilization: 

See also Department of Labour — Economics 
and Research Branch. 

Canada 

Employment Review: monthly summary of 
employment and unemployment regional 
summaries; Current Labour Statistics: Col- 
lective Bargaining Review (monthly 
feature). 

6th meeting, Advisory Committee on Pro- 
fessional Manpower, 19. 

seven surplus manpower areas qualify for 
accelerated depreciation, 542. 

United States 

employment and unemployment show increase 
in June, 752. 

Manufacturing Industries: 

Canada 

shift work and shift differentials in manufac- 
turing industries, 877. 

working conditions in manufacturing (1960), 
348 — plant workers, 349; office workers, 350. 

Marchand, Jean: 

See Confederation of National Trade Unions. 
Marconi Salaried Employees Association: 
Canadian Marconi Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 
796; rejected, 1036; reasons for judgment, 
1038; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1148; request for special leave (Rule 8) 
denied, 1148. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
performers and staff announcers employed 
at CFCF-TV, Montreal: granted, 1147; re- 
quest for special leave (Rule 8) denied, 1149. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (Special Services Division, Field 
Service Group): received, 470; granted, 794. 



XXXIV 



INDEX 



Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of 
Canada: 

The Algoma Central and Hudson Bay 
Railway Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers: received, 1150. 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers (Dominion Shipping Divi- 
sion) Montreal: received, 1149. 

Hall Corporation of Canada 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1149. 

National Sand and Material Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

N, M. Paterson and Sons Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1149. 

K. A, Powell (Canada) Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

Maritime Airline Pilots Association: 

Maritime Central Airways Limited 

certification application on, behalf of a unit of 
stewardesses, despatchers, ticket agents and 
general duty employees (cooks): granted, 43. 

Maritime Central Airways Limited: 

MALPA 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
stewardesses, despatchers, ticket agents and 
general duty employees (cooks): granted, 43. 

Married Women: 

United Kingdom 

Woman, Wife and Worker, a report on survey 
of married women workers at Peek Frean 
biscuit factory, 363. 

McAllister Towing Limited: 

SIV 

dispute: (employees, Sincennes-McNaughton 
Division): settlement, 46. 

McCabe Grain Company Limited: 

IBT 

dispute with Local 514: C.B. appointed, 472; 
C.B. fully constituted, 473. 

McGill University: 

Industrial Relations Centre 

conference, 647. 



McLean Kennedy, Limited (represented by 
the Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Medical Services: 

Ontario 

views expressed by OFL, 451. 
Middup Moving and Storage Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 519 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 673; 
granted, 795. 

Midland Railway of Manitoba: 

Associated Non-operating Unions 
(negotiating committee) 

dispute: settlement, 675. 

Migration: 

See Immigration — Emigration. 

Minimum Wages: 

Laws and Regulations 

A Iberta 
Labour Act: new orders, 691. 
British Columbia 
Male Minimum Wage Act: regulations, 572. 

Prince Edward Island 
Women's Minimum Wage Act: order, 1279. 

Quebec 
Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 483; regu- 
lations, 575, 1046. 

United States 
Fair Labor Standards Act: amendment, 700. 
Mining: 

Laws and Regulations 
Manitoba 
Mines Act: amendment, 163. 

Newfoundland 
Regulation of Mines Act: amendments, 271, 
383, 1237. 

Moloughney's Van and Storage Limited: 
IBT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: representation vote, 255; rejected, 
368. 

Montreal and St. John Stevedoring Company 
Limited (represented by the Shipping Feder- 
ation of Canada, Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 



INDEX 



XXXV 



Montreal Harbour Police Brotherhood: 
National Harbours Board (Montreal) 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
harbour and bridge security officers: repre- 
sentation vote, 153. 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau 
(certain member companies in Quebec): 

IBT 

dispute with Local 106: CO. appointed, 1271. 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau 
(representing certain companies within Fed- 
eral jurisdiction): 

IBT 

dispute with Local 880: CO. appointed, 921; 
C.B. appointed, 1151; CB. fully constituted, 
1151. 

Motor Transportation: 

See also Transportation. 

Laws and Regulations 

Prince Edward Island 
Motor Carrier Act: regulations, 698 



N 



National Association of Broadcast Employees 
and Technicians: 

Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees (CFTO-TV): received, 256; 
granted, 566. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; settlement, 472. 
Canadian Marconi Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: rejected, 
1036; reasons for judgment, 1038. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at CFCF-TV, Montreal: received, 
1037; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1148; request for special leave (Rule 8) 
denied, 1149. 

Channel Seven Television Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees at Station CJAY-TV, Winnipeg: 
received, 672; granted, 794. 

Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting 

Company Limited 

(Radio Station CKCR) 

dispute: settlement, 45. 

Radio Station CHVC 

dispute: CB. fully constituted, 45; C.B. report, 
370, 371; lapsed, 1175. 



National Association of Broadcast Employees 
and Technicians: — Cone. 

Radio Station CJMS Limited (Montreal) 

dispute: CB. appointed, 369; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 472-73; strike after board procedure, 
1041; settlement after strike after board 
procedure, 1271. 

Radio Station CKVL 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: representation vote, 1036; re- 
jected, 1148. 

Three Rivers Radio Inc, 

dispute: (Station CHLN): C.B. appointed, 257; 
C.B. fully constituted, 370; settlement, 473. 

Vantel Broadcasting Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
technicians: received, 470; granted, 794. 

National Association of Marine Engineers of 
Canada, Inc.: 

Abitibi Power and Paper Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: granted, 469. 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

Commercial Cable Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
granted, 672. 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

Hall Corporation of Canada 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

La Verendrye Line, Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
engineers: granted, 469. 

National Harbours Board 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers aboard tugs, Glenkeen and 
Sir Hugh Allan in Montreal Harbour: rep- 
resentation vote, 913; granted, 1035. 

National Sand and Material Company 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 



XXXVI 



INDEX 



National Association of Marine Engineers of 
Canada, Inc: — Cone. 

IS, M» Paterson and Sons, Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 914; reasons for judgment, 916. 

Redwood Enterprises Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 914; reasons for judgment, 916. 

Shell Canadian Tankers Limited 

dispute: (M. V. Western Shell and M. V. Tyee 
Shell) : CO. appointed, 472; settlement, 674. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 914; reasons for judgment, 916. 

Winona Steamship Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers and marine engineers: rejected, 
1036. 

National Council of Canadian Labour: 

Ottawa Pre-Mixed Concrete Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: rejected, 43. 

National Employment Service: 

Director's address at meeting of University 
Counselling and Placement Association, 656. 
Statistics 

"Labour Statistics: D-National Employment 
Service Statistics" (monthly feature). 

National Harbour Board Police Brotherhood: 

National Harbours Board (Montreal) 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
harbour and bridge security officers: rep- 
resentation vote, 153; granted, 255; rejected, 
255. 

National Harbours Board: 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers aboard tugs, Glenkeen and 
Sir Hugh Allan in Montreal Harbour: rep- 
resentation vote, 913; granted, 1035. 

SIIJ 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers aboard tugs Glenkeen and 
Sir Hugh Allan in Montreal Harbour: re- 
ceived, 673; representation vote, 913; granted, 
1035. 

dispute: (employees, Fleet Department, Mont- 
real Harbour) : settlement, 46. 



National Harbours Board (Churchill Harbour): 
CSAC 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1270; settlement, 1271. 

National Harbours Board (Montreal): 
MHPB 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
harbour and bridge security officers: rep- 
resentation vote, 153. 

NHBPB 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
harbour and bridge security officers: rep- 
resentation vote, 153; granted, 255; rejected, 
255. 

National Harbours Board (Port of Vancouver): 
VHEA 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
security guards: received, 796; granted, 913. 

National Harbours Board (Quebec): 
CSAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
harbour police: received, 1150. 

National Product: 

Canada 

gross national product for first quarter of 1961, 

684. 
gross national product in 1960, 16, 437. 

National Productivity Council: 

composition and membership, 214. 
meeting, 1002. 

views expressed by CNTU, 231. 
views expressed by IRB, 234. 

National Sand and Material Company Limited: 
CMSG 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: received, 43; representation 
vote, 469; granted, 913; rejected, 915. 

MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 470; 
rejected, 915; reasons for judgment, 916. 

SIV 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: received, 45; representation 
vote, 469; granted, 913; rejected, 915. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine officers: received, 45; representation 
vote, 470; rejected, 915; reasons for judg- 
ment, 916. 



INDEX 



XXXVII 



National Syndicate of Longshoremen of Ha! 
Ha! Bay: 

Saguenay Terminals Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257. 

National Syndicate of Maritime Workers of 
Lake Saint John: 

Price Bros, and Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: withdrawn, 674. 

National Syndicate of Salaried Employees of 
Saguenay Terminals Limited: 

Saguenay Terminals Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council: 

meeting, 1st, 550; 2nd, 1212. 

Natural Gas: 

See Gas, Natural. 

New Brunswick Federation of Labour: 

convention, 5th, 1254. 

New Year's Day: 

New Year message of Hon. Michael Starr, 

Minister of Labour, 1194. 
New Year messages from labour leaders, 1195. 

Newfoundland Federation of Labour: 

convention, 1256. 
Wm. C. Norris Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 106 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 154; 
granted, 255. 

North America Van Lines (Atlantic) Limited: 

IBT 

certification application by Local 927 on behalf 
of a unit of drivers, packers, craters and 
helpers: received, 915; granted, 1147. 

Northern Cleaning Agencies, Inc.: 

Building Service Employees International 
Union 

dispute with Local 298: CO. appointed, 369. 

Northern Wings Limited: 
lAM 

dispute: settlement, 45. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited: 
SIV 

dispute: CB. appointed, 472; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 569; CB. report, 798, 799; settle- 
ment, 1041. 



Northland Shipping Company Limited: 
SIV 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 154; with- 
drawn, 256. 

Northland Utilities Limited: 

IVEW 

certification application by Local 424: received, 
45; withdrawn, 674. 

Northland Utilities (B.C.) Limited: 

IVEW 

certification application by Local 424: received, 
45; withdrawn, 674. 

Northwest Shipping Company Limited: 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 672; granted, 
794. 

Nova Scotia Federation of Labour: 

convention, 1252. 



O 



Obituaries: 

Cocks, William, Saskatchewan labour leader, 
635. 

Occupational Health Hazards: 

See Health, Public. 
Office Buildings: 

See Factories. 
Office Employees' International Union: 

Consolidated Freightways 
dispute with Local 15: CO. appointed, 155; 

settlement, 257. 

Office Workers: 

See Manufacturing. 
Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited: 
VPWA 

dispute with Local 520: CO. appointed, 921; 
settlement, 1150. 

Oil: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — In- 
dustrial Safety and Health, 460. 
Public Lands Grants Act: regulations, 943. 
Territorial Lands Act: regulations, 943. 

Ontario 
Energy Act: amendments, 1279; regulations, 
272, 697. 



xxxvra 



INDEX 



Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers' Interna- 
tional Union: 

Polymer Corporation Limited 

dispute with Local 16-14 and Plant Unit (tech- 
nicians): CO. appointed, 797; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 1151; C.B. fully constituted, 1151. 

Old Age Assistance: 

Canada 

statistics, 110, 438, 752, 1139. 

Older Workers: 

Australia 

employment of older workers, 562. 

Canada 

analysis of replies to letter on hiring and reten- 
tion of older workers, sent to employers by 
Hon. Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, 
1260. 

Department of Labour broadcasts on older 
worker problem, 826, 964, 1028, 1141. 

employment adequacy of older persons, 34. 

first conference on Employment and Retirement 
of Older Workers, 664. 

study on problem of retirement of executives 
on basis of capability rather than chronolog- 
ical age, 779. 

United Kingdom 

The Older Worker and His Job, a review of re- 
search on aging, 362. 

United States 

gradual retirement plans tried by companies, 

unions, government, 875. 
White House Conference on Aging, 147, 465. 

Ontario Federation of Labour: 

brief submitted to provincial Government, 449. 
special brief on unemployment submitted to 

provincial cabinet, 451. 
Study Conference on Unemployment, 455. 
Women's Conference, 1261. 

Ontario Northland Railway: 

Associated Non-operating Unions 
(negotiating committee) 

dispute: settlement, 675. 
Operating Engineers: 

See Engineers. 

Order of Raih-oad Telegraphers: 
Canada 

Board of Adjustment established for disposition 
of disputes between Canadian Pacific Air 
Lines, Limited, and union, 76. 

United States 

collective agreement limiting number of jobs 
railroad may abolish signed between railway 
and ORT, 1210. 



Ottawa Pre-Mixed Concrete Limited: 
IBT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: rejected, 43. 

ISCCL 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: rejected, 43. 

Ottawa Atomic Workers Union: 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

dispute with Local No. 1541 (employees, Com- 
mercial Products Division, Ottawa): CO. ap- 
pointed, 569; settlement, 674. 

Ovemite Express Limited: 

Association of Employees of Ovemite 
Express Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees working in and out of Montreal, 
St. Jerome and Hull, Que., and Toronto, 
Ont.: withdrawn, 1037. 

IBT 

certification application by Locals 106 and 938 
on behalf of a unit of employees working in 
and out of Montreal, St. Jerome and Hull, 
Que., and Toronto, Ont.: received, 796; 
withdrawn, 1037. 

Overseas Transport Company Limited: 

ILWU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed employees: received, 1037; with- 
drawn, 1150. 



Pacific Elevators Limited: 
UBW 

dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

Pacific Stevedoring and Contracting Company 
Limited: 

ILWU 

dispute with Local 505: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1271. 

Pacific Tanker Company Limited: 

SIU 

dispute: CO. appointed, 45; settlement, 1040. 

Pacific Western Airlines Limited: 
lAM 

dispute: CO. appointed, 155; settlement, 369. 

N. M. Paterson and Sons Limited: 
MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1149. 



mDEX 



XXXK 



N. M. Paterson and Sons Limited: — Cone. 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 914; reasons for judgment, 916. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representation 
vote, 469; rejected, 914; reasons for judg- 
ment, 916. 



Pensions: 



Canada 



cost of federal social welfare — address by Dr. 
R. M. Clarke, UBC, to 14th annual con- 
ference of Canadian Tax Foundation, 23. 

Laws and Regulations 

Ontario 

portable pensions — draft bill prepared by On- 
tario Committee on Portable Pensions, 1018. 

Saskatchewan 

Employee Pension Plans Registration and Dis- 
closure Act: regulations, 1281. 

Petroleum: 

LtttPS and Regulations 

British Columbia 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Act: regulations, 
1156. 

Picketing: 

Legal Decisions : 

B.C. Supreme Court rules picketing may be 
restrained when strike illegal and obstruction 
occurs; upholds injunction, 376. 

B.C. Supreme Court rules that if picketing is 
to persuade it can be enjoined in the absence 
of a strike, 821. 

Supreme Court of Canada rules that peaceful 
picketing directed at causing a strike in viola- 
tion of Labour Relations Act is an action- 
able conspiracy, 939. 

Pipe Lines: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — In- 
dustrial Safety and Health, 464. 

Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of Canada: 

ILA 

dispute with Local 1654: (Hamilton opera- 
tions): CO. appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 
472; C.B. fully constituted, 473; C.B. re- 
port, 798, 803; strike action after Board 
procedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 



Pittston Stevedoring Corporation of 
Canada: — Cone. 

dispute with Local 1869 and Local 1842: CO. 
appointed, 257; C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. 
fully constituted, 473; C.B. report, 798, 809; 
strike action after Board procedure, 922; 
settlement, 1041. 

Placements: 

Canada 

NES counselling and placement in the 1960's, 
656. 

Plant Workers: 

See Manufacturing. 

Political Action: 

Quebec 

views expressed by QFL, 448. 

Polymer Corporation Limited: 
OCAAWW 

dispute with Local 16-14 and Plant Unit (tech- 
nicians): CO. appointed, 797; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 1151; C.B. fully constituted, 1151. 

"Portable" Pensions: 

See Pensions. 

Porter Shipping Limited: 

SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1149. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 1149. 

K. A. Powell (Canada) Limited: 
MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

Pressure Vessels: 

See Boilers. 

Price Bros, and Company Limited: 

NSMW 
certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: withdrawn, 674. 

Prices: 

Canada 

change in price of Labour Gazette, official 

publication of federal Department of Labour, 

1139. 
consumer price index revised, 398. 
"Prices and the Cost of Living" (monthly 

feature). 

Statistics 
"Labour Statistics: F-Priees" (monthly 

feature). 



XL 



INDEX 



Printing Trades: 

Canada 

monograph No. 9 issued by Department of 
Labour, 334. 

Private Employment Agencies: 

See Employment Agencies. 

Productivity: 

See also National Productivity Council. 
Canada 

program of Special Capital Cost Allowances 
for production of new products, 881. 

Professional Association of Industrialists: 

convention, 16th, 135. 

Professional Manpower: 

See Manpower Utilization. 

Public Health: 

See Health: 

Publications: 

See Department of Labour — Library. 



Quebec Central Railway Company: 

BLFE 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; C.B. appointed, 
921; C.B. fully constituted, 1040. 

Quebec Central Transportation Company: 
CBRT 

dispute: CO. appointed, 155; settlement, 257. 

Quebec Federation of Labour: 

annual convention, 5th, 130. 

brief submitted to provincial Government, 447. 

Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 
Company: 

BMWE 

request for review of decision under Section 
61 (2) of Act, 796; granted, 1037. 

lAM 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees in the Catering Department: re- 
ceived, 1269. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees in Freight Department: received, 
256; granted, 566. 

SIV 

dispute: lapsed, 675. 



Quebec Paper Sales and Transportation Com- 
pany Limited: 

SW 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; C.B. appointed, 

1040; C.B. fully constituted, 1151. 
Quebecair Inc.: 

CALPA 
dispute: C.B. report, 257, 258; lapsed, 1175. 



R 



Radiation: 

ILO and Euratom sign agreement on protection 
against radiation, 151. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Atomic Energy Control Act — Radiation Warn- 
ing Symbol Order, 481. 

Saskatchewan 
Radiological Health Act: regulations, 1233. 

Radio and Television Employees Union 
(CKVL)— (CNTU): 

Radio Station CKVL Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: received, 915; representation vote, 
1036; rejected, 1148. 

Radio Broadcasting: 

See Older Workers. 
Radio Station CHVC: 

NABET 

dispute: CB. fully constituted, 45; C.B. report, 
370, 371; lapsed, 1175. 

Radio Station CJMS Limited (Montreal): 
NABET 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 369; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 472-73; strike after Board procedure, 
1041; settlement after strike after Board 
procedure, 1271. 

Radio Station CKVL Limited: 
NABET 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: representation vote, 1036; re- 
jected, 1148. 

RTEU (CKVL).(CNTV) 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: received, 915; representation 
vote, 1036. 

Radioactive Substances: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — In- 
dustrial Safety and Health — Occupational 
Health Hazards, 464. 



INDEX 



XLI 



Railways: 

See also International Railway Brother- 
hoods. 

Canada 
CLC on enactment of Railway Operation Con- 
tinuation Act, 226. 

United States 

collective agreement limiting number of jobs 
railroad may abolish . . . signed between rail- 
way and ORT, 1210. 

15-man presidential commission to study rail- 
road work-rule dispute, 53. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Railway Continuation Act: regulations, 1225. 

Redevelopment: 

Laws and Regulatitms 

United States 
Area Redevelopment Act, 658. 

Redwood Enterprises Limited: 
CMSG 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: received, 796; representation 
vote, 913; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

SIU 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: representation vote, 913; re- 
ceived, 915; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

Registration: 

Laws and Regulations 

Saskatchewan 
Employee Pension Plans Registration and Dis- 
closure Act: regulations, 1281. 

Rehabilitation: 

See also Vocational Rehabilitation, 
investment in training and education urgently 
needed for world peace — address of David 
A. Morse, Director, to international con- 
gress marking 80th anniversary of the Or- 
ganization for Rehabilitation through Train- 
ing, 37. 

Retirement: 

United States 

gradual retirement plans tried by companies, 
unions, government, 875. 

Retraining: 

See Training. 



Rio Algom Mines Limited: 

USWA 

dispute with Local 5980 (office and technical 
employees): CO. appointed, 568; settle- 
ment, 674. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited: 
UPWA 

dispute with Local 201: CO. appointed, 155; 

settlement, 369. 
dispute with Local 342: CO. appointed, 155; 

settlement, 369. 
dispute with Local 416: CO. appointed, 1270. 

Rowers Freight and Marine Services Limited: 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 1037; granted, 1147. 

Royal Commission of Enquiry on the Logging 
Industry: 

reference, 1236. 

Royal Commission on Industrial Safety 
(Ontario): 

report, 1238. 



Sabre Freight Lines Limited: 
IBT 

dispute with Local 605: CO. appointed, 1150. 

Safety, Industrial: 

Ontario 

recommendations of Royal Commission on In- 
dustrial Health, 1238. 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 

Electrical Protection Act: amendment, 60. 
Factories Act: regulations, 60. 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — Indus- 
trial Safety and Health, 242, 357, 460. 
legislation in 1961, 1232. 

Newfoundland 

Regulation of Mines Act: amendments, 271, 
383. 

Saskatchewan 

passenger and Freight Elevator Act: regula- 
tions, 60. 

United States 

Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act: regula- 
tions, 483: ■ 



XLII 



INDEX 



Saguenay Tenninals Limited: 

National Syndicate of Longshoremen of 
Ha! Ha! Bay 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257; settlement, 797. 

National Syndicate of Salaried Employees 

of Saguenay Terminals Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257; settlement, 797. 
St. John's (Iberville) Transport Company 
Limited: 

IBT 

certification application by Locals 106 and 938 
on behalf of a unit of employees employed 
at Iberville, Que. and Toronto, Ont.: re- 
ceived, 369, 568; withdrawn, 568; granted, 
794. 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority: 
CERT 

dispute: CO. appointed, 257; settlement, 472. 

Salaries: 

Canada 

engineering and scientific salaries in 1961: 
preliminary survey, 662. 

Sannie Transportation Company Limited: 
SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 153; with- 
drawn, 256. 

Saslcatchewan Association of Civil Servants: 

Association withdraws from membership in 
Federation of Labour because of dispute 
with NUPSE, 1251. 

Saslcatchewan Federation of Labour: 

Association of Civil Servants withdraws from 
membership in Federation of Labour because 
of dispute with NUPSE, 1251. 

convention, 6th, 1250. 

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool: 

BRSC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
electricians in terminal elevator division at 
Fort William and Port Arthur: received, 155; 
withdrawn, 471. 

UBW 
dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 
Schollie, George P.: 

See International Association of Machinists. 
School Laws and Regulations: 

Canada 
legislation of the past decade, 27. 

Ontario 
Schools Administration Act: amendment, 1099. 

Quebec 
Education Act: amendment, 1099. 



Scientific Employees: 

See Professional Employees. 



Scientists: 



Canada 



engineering and scientific salaries in 1961: 

preliminary survey, 662. 
Engineering and Scientific Manpower Resources 

in Canada: Their Employment, Earnings and 

Salary Rates, 1960-61, 1211. 

D. S. Scott Transport: 

IBT 

dispute with Local 605 on behalf of a unit of 
employees at Vancouver Terminal: lapsed, 

675. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited: 
MEBAC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1150. 

NAME 
certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
reasons for judgment, 916. 

SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representation 
vote, 469; rejected, 914; reasons for judg- 
ment, 916. 

Seaboard and Western Airlines Incorporated: 
lAM 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
aircraft maintenance and fleet service em- 
ployees: received, 368; withdrawn, 471. 

Seafarers' International Union of North 
America: 

Abitibi Power and Paper Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 154; granted, 
469. 

Alaska Cruise Lines Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; settlement, 472 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 45; representa- 
tion vote, 470; rejected, 915; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Beaver Dredging Company Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 568; settlement, 674. 

Cadwell Marine Limited 
dispute: settlement, 257. 



INDEX 



XLIII 



Seafarers' International Union of North 
America: — Cont. 

Canadian National Steamships Company 
Limited (Pacific Coast Service) 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1270. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

dispute: certain employees on SS Princess 
Helene: C.B. report, 45, 46; settlement, 1041. 

Canuk Lines Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 796. 

Commercial Cable Company 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers aboard vessels based in 
Canada: received, 44; representation vote, 
470; granted, 672. 

dispute: (SS Cable Guardian) (licensed engi- 
neers): CO. appointed, 797; C.B. appointed, 
1040; C.B. fully constituted, 1151. 

dispute: (SS Cable Guardian) (unlicensed per- 
sonnel): CO. appointed, 797. 

Davie Transportation Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; C.B. appointed, 
1151; CB. fully constituted, 1271. 

Dominion Coal Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 154; rejected, 
470. 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 470; rejected, 915; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

dispute: (employees, Dominion Shipping Divi- 
sion, Montreal): CO. appointed, 921; CB. 
appointed, 1271. 

Eagle Transportation Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1037. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 1037. 

Federal Commerce and Navigation Company 
Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 472; C.B. appointed, 
675; CB. fully constituted, 797. 

Foundation Maritime Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel employed aboard tug- 
boats: received, 43; rejected, 255. 

Gulf Islands Navigation Limited 

dispute: lapsed, 675. 



Seafarers' International Union of North 
America: — Cont. 

Hall Corporation of Canada 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 469; rejected, 915; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Harbour Development Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 568; settlement, 674. 

Holden Sand and Gravel Limited 

dispute: settlement, 155. 

Island Shipping Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel employed aboard Wheat 
King and the Northern Venture: representa- 
tion vote, 1035; received, 1037; granted, 
1147; rejected, 1148. 

Kingcome Navigation Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: rejected, 43. 

La Verendrye Line Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; granted, 
469. 

McAllister Towing Limited 

dispute: (employees, Sincennes-McNaughton 
Division) : settlement, 46. 

National Harbours Board 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers aboard tugs Glenkeen and 
Sir Hugh Allan in Montreal Harbour: re- 
ceived, 673; representation vote, 913; granted, 
1035. 

dispute: (employees. Fleet Department, Mont- 
real Harbour) : settlement, 46. 

National Sand and Material Company 
Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck oflEicers: received, 45; reprsentation 
vote, 469; granted, 913; rejected, 915. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine officers: received, 45; representation 
vote, 470; rejected, 915; reasons for judg- 
ment, 916. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 472; CB. fully con- 
stituted, 569; C.B. report, 798, 799; settle- 
ment, 1041. 

Northland Shipping Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 154; with- 
drawn, 256. 



XLIV 



INDEX 



Seafarers' International Union of North 
America: — Cone. 

Pacific Tanker Company Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 45; settlement, 1040. 
TV. M, Paterson and Sons Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 469; rejected, 914; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Porter Shipping Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 1149. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 1149. 

Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 
Company 

dispute: lapsed, 675. 

Quebec Paper Sales and Transportation 
Company Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
1040; CB. fully constituted, 1151. 

Redwood Enterprises Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: representation vote, 913; re- 
ceived, 915; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

Sannie Transportation Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
unlicensed personnel: received, 153; with- 
drawn, 256. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 469; rejected, 914; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Shell Canadian Tankers Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; CB. appointed, 
569; CB. fully constituted, 675; C B. report, 
798; settlement, 922. 

Guy Tombs Marine Service Limited 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
1151; CB. fully constituted, 1271. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 469; rejected, 914; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited 

dispute: settlement, 369. 

Winona Steamship Company Limited 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers and marine engineers on SS 
Hillsdale: representation vote, 913; received, 
915; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 



Seasonal Unemployment: 

See Unemployment, Seasonal. 

Seaway Forwarding Agencies Limited: 
ILA 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: request for review of decision, 
471. 

dispute with Local 1854; CO. appointed, 257; 
settlement, 797. 

Shell Canadian Tankers Limited: 

CMSG 
dispute: (employees on M. V. Western Shell 
and M. V. Tyee Shell): CO. appointed, 
568; settlement, 674. 

NAME 

dispute: (M. V. Western Shell and M. V. Tyee 
Shell): CO. appointed, 472; settlement, 674. 

SIU 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; CB. appointed, 
569; CB. fully constituted, 675; CB. report, 
798; settlement, 922. 

J. Sherman and Sons Limited: 
IBT 

dispute with Local 880: lapsed, 675. 

Shift Systems: 

Canada 

shift work and shift differentials in manufactur- 
ing industries, 877. 

Shipping: 

Canada 

in CLC brief to Cabinet, Metal Trades Federa- 
tion presents 5-point program to assist mari- 
time industry, 232. 

vessels carried 88 per cent of coastwise cargoes 
in 1959, 110. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Canada Shipping Act — regulations, 481. 

Shipping Federation of British Columbia: 

ILWU 

dispute with Locals 506, 507 and 510: settle- 
ment, 369. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.: 
ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on be- 
half of a unit of shed employees: received, 
1269. 

dispute with Local 375: CO. appointed, 472; 
CB. appointed, 569; CB. fully constituted, 
675; CB. report, 922; settlement, 922. 



INDEX 



XLV 



Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.: — Cone. 
ILA — Cone. 

dispute with Local 1552: CO. appointed, 569; 

settlement, 674. 
dispute with Local 1657: (checkers and cargo 

repairmen): CO. appointed, 1151; CB. fully 

constituted, 1271. 

Shops: 

See Factories. 
Sickness Surrey: 

See Insurance, Health. 
Silicosis: 

Laws and Regulations 
Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^In- 
dustrial Safety and Health — Occupational 
Health Hazards, 464, 495. 

Ski Tows: 

Latvs and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Railway Act: regulations, 249. 

New Brunswick 
Elevators and Lifts Act: regulation, 264. 

Nova Scotia 
Elevators and Lifts Act: regulations, 249, 264. 

Ontario 
Elevators and Lifts Act: regulations, 249, 264. 
Skilled Manpower: 

See Training. 
Skilled Work: 
See Training. 

Snow, John A.: 

IBT 

certification application by Local 419 on be- 
half of a unit of mail pick-up and delivery 
drivers: received, 43; granted, 153. 

Social Security: 

the cost of social security in 41 countries — 
ILO publication, 669. 

Canada 

cost of federal social welfare — address by Dr. 
R. M. Clarke, U.B.C, to 14th annual con- 
ference of Canadian Tax Foundation, 23. 

views expressed by CCC, 1258. 

views expressed by CLC, 225. 

Special Capital Cost Allowances: 

See Capital Cost Allowances: 
Stationary Engineers: 
See Engineers. 



Steel Industry: 



Nova Scotia 



views expressed by Federation of Labour re 
Dosco steel workers, 1252. 

United States 

summary of report on study of collective bar- 
gaining in the steel industry by the Depart- 
ment of Labour, 374. 



Strike Votes: 



Canada 



study on Government Supervised Strike Votes 
by Prof. E. R. Anton, University of Alberta, 
under Labour Department — University Re- 
search Program, 762. 

Strikes and Lockouts: 

Canada 

regional factors in industrial conflict — address 

by Prof. Stuart Jamieson to 33rd Annual 

Meeting of the Canadian Political Science 
Association, 878. 

Legal Decisions 

Supreme Court of Canada rules that peaceful 
picketing directed at causing a strike in 
violation of Labour Relations Act is an 
actionable conspiracy, 939. 

Toronto Magistrate's Court upholds the right 
of an employer to discharge from employ- 
ment workers on strike legally called, 1277. 

Statistics 

"Labour Statistics: G — Strikes and Lockouts" 
(monthly feature). 

Sunday Observance: 

Legal Decisions 

Supreme Court of Canada rules owner of coin- 
operated laundry open on Sunday guilty of 
contravening Lord's Day Act, 1272. 

Surplus Labour Areas: 

Canada 

seven surplus manpower areas qualify for 
accelerated depreciation, 542. 

Sydney and Louisburg Railway Company: 
BRT 

certification application by Local 684 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: received, 1269. 

Sydney Transfer and Storage Limited: 
CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees: representation vote, 255; re- 
jected, 470. 



XLVI 



INDEX 



Tahsis Company Limited: 
ILWU 

certification application by Local 503 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: rejected, 368; 
request for review of decision, 471; denied, 
567. 

IWW 

certification application by Local 1-85 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: rejected, 368; request 
for review of decision, 471; denied, 567. 

Tank Truck Transport Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Locals 880 and 938 
on behalf of a unit of employees: rejected, 
153. 

dispute with Locals 938 and 880: lapsed, 675. 



Tariffs: 



Canada 



CLC executive council proposes new role for 
GATT that would provide a method for 
meeting import competition from countries 
maintaining low wages and unfair labour 
standards, 1210. 

Taxation: 

Canada 

views expressed by CCA, 353. 
views of CM A, 16. 

Technical and Vocational Training Assistance 
Act: 

regulations, 222. 

Technical Training: 

See Training. 

Technological Change: 

See Automation. 

Technological Education: 

Canada 

establishment of National Advisory Committee 
on Technological Education, 550; report of 
committee, 1213. 

Termination of Employment: 

See Employment. 

Three Rivers Radio Inc.: 

NABET 

dispute: (Station CHLN): C.B. appointed, 257; 
C.B. fully constituted, 370; settlement, 473. 



Three Rivers Shipping Company Limited: 

ILA 

dispute with Local 1846: CO. appointed, 1040; 
settlement, 1271. 

Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited: 

CBRT 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 

warehouse employees and drivers: granted, 

43. 
dispute: CO. appointed, 257; CB. appointed, 

369; CB. fully constituted, 473; CB. report, 

675, 676. 

Guy Tombs Marine Service Limited: 
SW 

dispute: CO. appointed, 797; CB. appointed, 
1151; CB. fully constituted, 1271. 

Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway 
Company: 

Associated Non-operating Unions 
(negotiating committee) 

dispute: settlement, 675. 



Trade: 



Canada 



Canada's trade with other countries reached 
new peak in 1960, 109. 

CLC executive council proposes new role for 
GATT that would provide a method for 
meeting import competition from countries 
maintaining low wages and unfair labour 
standards, 1210. 

views expressed by CLC, 225. 

views expressed by CNTU, 232. 

Trade Analyses: 

See Trade Standards. 
Trade Schools: 

See Vocational Education. 
Trade Secretariats: 

See International Trade Secretariats. 
Trade Standards: 

Canada 
trade analyses published by the Department 

of Labour, 702. 

Trades Union Congress (Great Britain): 

economic department report agrees workers 
must leave declining industries for expand- 
ing ones, 1209. 

meeting, 93rd, 1116. 

Miss Anne Godwin elected chairman of Gen- 
eral Council of TUC, 1120. 

urges U.K. Government to ratify ILO Equal 
Pay Convention, 891. 



INDEX 



XL VII 



Tradesmen's Qualifications: 

See Apprenticeship. 

Training: 

ICFTU resolution on vocational training and 
guidance for girls and women, 148. 

investment in training and education urgently 
needed for world peace — address of David 
A. Morse, Director, to international congress 
marking 80th anniversary of the Organiza- 
tion for Rehabilitation through Training, 
37. 

Belgium 

experiment suggests retraining works for the 
few, 876. 

Canada 

all provinces to observe Commonwealth Train- 
ing Week, 438. 

Canadian industry must close gap between the 
skills it has and the skills it needs — K. 
Hallsworth, Director of Industrial Relations, 
Ford Motor Company of Canada, 768. 

Commonwealth Training Week, 219. 

emphasis on apprenticeship training urged by 
CCA President Arthur G. Sullivan, 1137. 

first national conference on technological train- 
ing, 546. 

higher allowances for unemployed undergoing 
training suggested by Hon. Michael Starr, 
Minister of Labour, 1137. 

158 new training institutions — institutes of tech- 
nology, trade schools and vocational high 
schools — get federal contribution, 1208. 

program for training unemployed workers — 
federal-provincial Special Vocational Train- 
ing Projects Agreement, 351. 

Quebec enters technical and vocational training 

agreement, 1004. 
resolution recommended by subcommittee on 

training of unemployed approved by National 

Technical and Vocational Training Advisory 

Council, 1212. 
views expressed by CCC, 1258. 
views expressed by CCA re vocational training, 

353. 

^ova Scotia 

federal-provincial plan to expand vocational 
and technical training facilities in Nova 
Scotia announced by Federal Minister of 
Labour and Premier of Nova Scotia, 872. 

Quebec 

federal-provincial agreement on training of un- 
employed workers registered with NES under 
Federal-Provincial Training Program, 14. 

Quebec enters technical and vocational training 
agreement, 1004. 



Training: — Cone. 

United Kingdom 

how Britain plans to observe Commonwealth 
Technical Training Week, 332. 

new apprentice training scheme organized, 873. 

shortage of skilled workers despite unemploy- 
ment reports National Production Advisory 
Council on Industry, 712. 

United States 

retraining of unemployed workers. . .series of 
articles published by Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics, 1100. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
legislation dealing with training and education 
to promote the training of more skilled 
workers, enacted in 1961, 1096. 

Transair Limited: 

CALPA 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
pilots: received, 369; granted, 672. 

lAM 

dispute: CO. appointed, 369; settlement, 472. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines: 

CALFAA 

dispute: C.B. appointed, 45; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 257; C.B. report, 675, 679; settle- 
ment, 922. 

CALPA 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1150. 
lAM 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
cafeteria employees at Montreal airport: re- 
ceived, 153; granted, 255. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
lead production planners, production plan- 
ners, production forecasters and parts routes: 
granted, 1147; received, 1149. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
planners employed at Overhaul Base at 
Montreal International Airport, Dorval: re- 
ceived, 916; withdrawn, 1150. 

TCA Sales Employees Association 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1040. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines Sales Employees 
Association: 

Trans-Canada Air Lines 

dispute: CO. appointed, 1040. 

Transportation: 

See also Motor Transportation. 
ILO Inland Transport Committee, 7th session, 
667. 



XLvra 



INDEX 



Transportation: — Cone. 

Canada 

views expressed by IRB, 235. 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 

Industrial Transportation Act: amendments, 
1237. 

Ontario 
Highway Traffic Act: regulations, 825. 

Trench Excavation: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 

Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^Indus- 
trial Safety and Health, 464. 



U 



Unemployment: 

See also Manpower Utilization. 
Canada 

Employment Review: monthly summary of 
employment and unemployment; regional 
summaries; Current Labour Statistics; Col- 
lective Bargaining Review (monthly feature). 

James E. Coyne, Governor of the Bank of 
Canada, in his annual report, states "no 
price too great to effect cut in unemploy- 
ment", 336. 

federal-provincial agreement on training of un- 
employed workers registered with NES under 
Federal-Provincial Training Program, 14. 

higher allowances for unemployed undergoing 
training suggested by Hon. Michael Starr, 
Minister of Labour, 1137. 

meeting of labour, management and govern- 
ment officials discusses economic problems 
contributing to unemployment, 333. 

program for training unemployed workers — 
federal-provincial Special Vocational Train- 
ing Projects Agreement, 351. 

resolution recommended by subcommittee on 
training of unemployed approved by National 
Technical and Vocational Training Advisory 
Council, 1212. 

views expressed by CNTU, 231. 

Ontario 

courses designed to increase proficiency of un- 
employed women, 252. 

special brief on unemployment submitted by 
OFL, to provincial cabinet, 451. 

Quebec 

views expressed by QFL, 132. 



Unemployment: — Cone. 

United States 

Interstate Conference of Employment Security 
Agencies told prosperity will not cure loci 
"pockets" of unemployment, 336. 

retraining of unemployed workets. . . series of 
articles published by Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics, 1100. 

Unemployment Insurance: 
Canada 

committee to examine Unemployment In- 
surance Act appointed, 752. 

"Twenty Years of Unemployment Insurance", 
1009. 

views expressed by CCA, 353. 

views expressed by CNTU, 231. 

Quebec 

views expressed by QFL, 132. 

Laws and Regulations 
United States 
1960 amendments to legislation, 391. 
Statistics 

"Labour Statistics: E-Unemployment Insurance" 
(monthly feature). 

monthly report on operation of Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Act. 

Unemployment Insurance Advisory Committee: 

annual report (1961), 1012. 

A. H. Brown, former federal Deputy Minister 

of Labour, appointed chairman, 488. 
special report, 122. 

Unemployment Insurance Commission: 
Umpire — Decisions 

Decisions, CUB— 1781, 62; 1785, 63; 1792, 
170; 1800, 171; 1805, 274; 1807, 276; 1807, 
276; 1816, 486; 1820, 487; 1818, 577; 1819, 
578; 1850, 946; 1863, 948; 1871, 1158; 
1876, 1159; 1881, 1283; 1887, 1284; CUC— 
57, 388; 59, 389; 61, 390. 

halts sale of insurance stamps to employers of 
casual labour, 334. 

Unemployment, Seasonal: 

Canada 

CCA President Arthur G. Sullivan urges all 
Canadian municipalities to apply for federal 
grants under Municipal Winter Works In- 
centive Program, 1136. 

extension of Municipal Winter Works Incentive 
Program, 332, 752. 

federal-provincial Municipal 1961-62 Winter 
Works Incentive Program off to encouraging 
start, 1136. 



INDEX 



XLK 



Unemployment, Seasonal: — Cone. 

federal winter works payments totalled $35.9 

million in 1960-61, 873. 
Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program 

during 1960-61, 541. 
replies to letter on hiring and retention of older 

workers, sent to employers by Hon. Michael 

Starr, Minister of Labour, analysed, 1260. 

Unfair Labour Practices: 

Laws and Regulations 

British Columbia 
Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1225. 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^VIII — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation — Unfair Practices, 777. 

Union Security: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^VIII — 
Part 7 — Labour Relations and Trade Union 
Legislation — Union Security Clauses, 778. 

United Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural 
Implement Workers of America, International 
Union: 

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 

office employees: received, 1037. 
dispute: CO. appointed, 797; settlement, 921. 

United States 

profit-sharing plan and wider s.u.b. provisions 
gained by UAW in new collective agree- 
ments, 1041. 

United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and 
Distillery Workers of America (International 
Union): 

Alberta Wheat Pool 

dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

Burrard Terminals Limited 

dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

Pacific Elevators Limited 
dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 
Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 
dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

United Grain Growers Limited 
dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America: 

Bennett and White Construction Company 
Limited 

certification application by Local 2499 on be- 
half of a unit of carpenters: received, 369; 
granted, 566. 



United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America: — Cone. 

General Enterprises Limited 

certification application by Local 2499 on be- 
half of a unit of carpenters: received, 1149. 

United Grain Growers Limited: 

UBW 

dispute with Local 333: settlement, 46. 

United Grain Growers Terminals Limited: 
WOE 

certification application by Local 882: request 
for review of decision granted, 1038. 

United Keno Hill Mines Limited: 

lUMMSW 

dispute with Local 924: CO. appointed, 796; 
settlement, 921. 

United Mine Workers of America: 

Central Truck Lines Limited 

certification application by Local 15026 on be- 
half of a unit of employees: representation 
vote, 913; granted, 1035. 

Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited 

dispute with Local 13173: CO. appointed, 797; 
settlement, 797. 

United Packinghouse Workers of America: 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited 

dispute with Local 520: CO. appointed, 921; 
settlement, 1150. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited 

dispute with Local 201: CO. appointed, 155; 

settlement, 369. 
dispute with Local 342: CO. appointed, 155; 

settlement, 369. 
dispute with Local 416: CO. appointed, 1270. 

United States: 

Department of Labor 

Arthur J. Goldberg appointed Secretary of 
Labor, 15. 

United Steelworkers of America: 

Denison Mines Limited 

dispute with Local 5185 (office and technical 
emloyees): settlement, 45. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company 
Limited 

certification application by Local 5197 on be- 
half of a unit of longshoremen: received, 
796; granted, 913. 



INDEX 



United Steelworkers of America: — Cone. 
Rio Algom Mines Limited 

dispute with Local 5980 (office and technical 
employees): CO. appointed, 568; settlement, 
674. 

Upper Lakes Shipping Limited: 
BRSC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 

longshoremen: received, 568; granted, 794; 

review of decision under Section 61 (2) of 

Act, 916; granted, 1037. 
certification application on behalf of a unit of 

longshoremen: received, 796; granted, 1035. 

CLC 

dispute with Local 23736: employees in Grain 
Elevator Division: CO. appointed, 1270. 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: representation vote, 469; 
rejected, 914; reasons for judgment, 916. 

SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
marine engineers: received, 44; representa- 
tion vote, 469; rejected, 914; reasons for 
judgment, 916. 

Uranium City Power Company Limited: 

lUEW 

certification application by Local 424: received, 
45. 



Vacations: 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 
Labour Act: new order, 693. 

British Columbia 
Annual Holidays Act: amendment, 1018. 

Manitoba 
Vacations with Pay Act: regulations, 573. 

Saskatchewan 
Weekly Half-Holiday Act: regulations, 958. 

Vancouver Alberta Freightlines Limited: 
IBT 

certification application by Local 605 and Local 
514 on behalf of a unit of drivers, mechanics 
and warehousemen: received, 672; withdrawn, 
796. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited: 
CBRT 

dispute with Local 425: settlement, 155. 



Vancouver Barge Transportation 
Limited: — Cone. 

CMSG 

dispute with Local 425: settlement, 155. 

ILWU 
dispute with Local 512: settlement, 155. 

SW 

dispute: settlement, 369. 

Vancouver Harbour Employees' Association: 

National Harbours Board (Port of 
Vancouver) 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
security guards: received, 796; granted, 913. 

Vancouver Wharves Limited: 
ILWU 

certification application by Local 512 on behalf 
of a unit of employees employed at the Com- 
pany's operation at North Vancouver in the 
handling and warehousing of cargo and in 
the maintenance of plant equipment: granted, 
43. 

dispute with Local 512: CO. appointed, 568; 
settlement, 674. 

Vantel Broadcasting Company Limited: 
ANG 

certification application by Local 115 on behalf 
of certain employees in News, Production, 
and Administrative Departments at CHAN- 
TV, Vancouver: received, 567; granted, 794. 

lATSE 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
employees employed in Design and Film 
Departments at CHAN-TV, Vancouver: re- 
ceived, 568; granted, 794. 

NABET 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
technicians: received, 470; granted, 794. 

Venezuelan Confederation of Labour: 

President visits Ottawa, 634. 

Vocational Education: 

Canada 

158 new training institutions — institutes of tech- 
nology, trade schools and vocational high 
schools — get federal contributions, 1208. 

Vocational Education in the 1960's — address by 
C R. Ford, Director of Vocational Training 
Branch, Department of Labour, 441. 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 

Trade Schools Regulation Act: amendment, 
1278. 



INDEX 



LI 



Vocational Education: — Cone. 
Newfoundland 
Regulation of Trade Schools Act: regulations, 
385. 

Saskatchewan 
Trade Schools Regulation Act: amendment, 

1160; regulations, 825. 
Vocational Rehabilitation: 

Canada 
Miss Valerie A. Sims appointed to staff of 
National Co-ordinator of Civilian Rehabilita- 
tion, Department of Labour, 1137. 
statistical report on rehabilitated persons, 1259. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons 

Act: provisions, 1097. 
Vocational Schools: 

Laws and Regulations 

Quebec 

Private Vocational Schools Act: amendments, 

574. 
Vocational Training: 
See also Training. 

Canada 
National Technical and Vocational Training 

Advisory Council — first meeting, 550. 
technical and vocational training in Canada — 
extracts from address by C. R. Ford, Direc- 
tor, Vocational Training, Department of 
Labour, 443. 
views expressed by CCC, 1258. 
ISova Scotia 
federal-provincial plan to expand vocational 
and technical training facilities in Nova 
Scotia announced by Federal Minister of 
Labour and Premier of Nova Scotia, 872. 
Quebec 
Quebec enters technical and vocational train- 
ing agreement, 1004. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Technical and Vocational Training Assistance 

Act: regulations, 222. 
Vocational Training Advisory Council: 

See National Technical and Vocational Train- 
ing Advisory Council. 



W 



Wages and Salaries: 

See also General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade; Manpower Utilization; Minimum 
Wages, 
salaries of union leaders in Canada and the 

United States, 875. 



Wages and Salaries: — Cone. 

British Columbia 

united front in 1962 wage negotiations decided 
on by Federation of Labour, 1246. 

Canada 

Engineering and Scientific Manpower Resources 
in Canada: Their Earnings, Employment and 
Education, 1959: No. 9 in Professional Man- 
power Bulletin Series, issued by Department 
of Labour, 445. 

Engineering and Scientific Manpower Resources 
in Canada: Their Employment, Earnings and 
Salary Rates, 1960-61: No. 10 in Professional 
Manpower Bulletin Series, issued by Depart- 
ment of Labour, 1211. 

Nova Scotia 

views expressed by Federation of Labour re 
hospital employees, 1252. 

United Kingdom 

Government's appeal for wages restraint re- 
jected by TUC, 1117. 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — ^pro- 
tection of wages, 29. 

Saskatchewan 
Employees' Wage Act: regulations, 1015. 
Wages Recovery Act: amendment, 1018. 

Statistics 

"Labour Statistics: C-Employment, Hours and 
Earnings", (monthly feature). 

Welfare: 

See Social Security. 

Western Terminals Limited: 

BRSC 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen: received, 1150. 

Western Union Telegraph Company: 

ACA 

dispute: (Cable Division): C.B. appointed, 257; 
C.B. fully constituted, 369; C.B. report, 798, 
814. 

Westward Shipping Limited: 
CBRT 

dispute with Local 425: CO. appointed, 472; 

settlement, 674. 

CMSG 
dispute: (employees on M.V, B.C. Standard 

and M.V. Standard Service) : CO. appointed, 

569; settlement, 674. 



LII 



INDEX 



White Pass and Yukon Route: 

BMWE 

certification application by Local 605 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 1149; 
withdrawn, 1269. 

IBT 

certification application by Local 605 on behalf 
of a unit of employees: received, 1149; 
withdrawn, 1269. 

Horace B. Willis Limited: 
LPU 

dispute: CO. appointed, 921. 

Winona Steamship Company Limited: 
CMSG 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: received, 796; representation 
vote, 913; received, 915; granted, 1035; re- 
jected, 1036. 

NAME 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers and marine engineers: rejected, 
1036. 

SW 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers: representation vote, 913; re- 
ceived, 915; granted, 1035; rejected, 1036. 

certification application on behalf of a unit of 
deck officers and marine engineers on S.S. 
Hillsdale: received, 915; rejected, 1036. 

Winter Works: 

See Unemployment, Seasonal. 

Wolfe Stevedores Limited (represented by the 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc.): 

ILA 

certification application by Local 375 on behalf 
of a unit of shed employees: received, 1269. 

Women in Industry: 

UN Commission on the Status of Women, 665. 
Canada 

A New Career For Women After 30 — report 
issued by Women's Bureau, Department of 
Labour, 22. 

A Niche of Usefulness — booklet issued by 
Women's Bureau, Department of Labour, de- 
scribes how handicapped women can help 
themselves, 634. 

continuing education for women, 35. 

first women managers appointed by Bank of 
Nova Scotia, 1005. 



Women in Industry: — Cone. 

occupations of farm daughters — Department of 
Agriculture survey, 780. 

Norway 

national conference of women trade unionists, 

1261. 
"The Working Women of Norway", 1142. 

Ontario 

courses designed to increase proficiency of im- 

employed women, 252. 
Women's Conference of the Ontario Federation 

of Labour, 1261. 

Sweden 

women in trade unions, 1029. 

United Kingdom 

employed women in Britain, 910. 

Woman, Wife and Worker, a report on survey 

of married women workers at Peek Frean 

biscuit factory, 363. 

United States 

Mrs. Esther Peterson appointed Director of 
Women's Bureau, 148. 

Working Conditions: 

See Labour Conditions. 

Workmen's Compensation: 
Canada 

claims under Government Employees Compen- 
sation Act recorded for fiscal year ended 
March 31, 1961, 575. 

job injuries in the Civil Service — report of 
Government Employees Compensation 
Branch for fiscal year ended March 31, 1961, 
1094. 

Ontario 

views expressed by OFL, 451. 

Laws and Regulations 

Alberta 

Workmen's Compensation Act: amendments, 
382, 882, 883, 884, 885, 886; regulation, 
944. 

British Columbia 

Workmen's Compensation Act: regulations, 

822. 

Canada 
changes in 1961 in provincial laws, 882. 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — III — 

Part 4 — ^Workmen's Compensation, 144. 

Manitoba 
Workmen's Compensation Act: amendments, 
882, 883, 884. 



INDEX 



Lm 



Workmen's Compensation: — Cent. 

New Brunswick 
Workmen's Compensation Act: amendment, 
885. 

Newfoundland 

Workmen's Compensation Act: amendments, 
882, 883, 884, 885, 886. 

Nova Scotia 
Workmen's Compensation Act: amendments, 
882, 883, 884, 885, 886. 

Ontario 
Workmen's Compensation Act: amendments, 
163, 482. 

Prince Edward Island 
Workmen's Compensation Act: amendments, 
882, 883, 884. 

Quebec 
Workmen's Compensation Act: regulations, 
575. 

United States 
1960 amendments to state legislation, 272. 

Yukon Territory 
Workmen's Compensation Ordinance: amend- 
ments, 886. 



Workmen's Compensation: — Cone. 

Legal Decision 

B.C. Court of Appeal rules Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board decision made within its 
jurisdiction is not reviewable, 474. 



Yorkwood Shipping and Trading Company 
Limited: 

ILA 

certification application by Local 1654 
(formerly International Brotherhood of 
Longshoremen, Local 1817): request for re- 
view of decision, 472; granted. 566. 

dispute with Local 1654: CO. appointed, 257; 
C.B. appointed, 472; C.B. fully constituted, 
473; C.B. report, 798, 803; strike action after 
Board procedure, 922; settlement, 1041. 

Youth: 

Laws and Regulations 

Canada 
Labour Legislation of the Past Decade — Em- 
ployment of Young Persons, 28. 
New Brunswick 
Youth Assistance Act: provisions, 1099. 



Vol. LXI No. 1 

JANUARY 31, 1961 



t 



'■^•#-4-' 



r 






'it'- 



it'^ 



l^^^^'wWr 






Advisory Committee on Professional Manpower (p. 19) 



rhiy by the 



m^i'm^miiv' 




KRTMENT OF LABOUR 



CANADA 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Deparf-ment of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 

Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 

Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 

Assistant Editor 

W. R. Channon 

Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
National Film Board 



Vol. LXI, No. 1 CONTENTS January 31, 1961 

Employment Review 1 

Collective Bargaining Review 7 

Notes of Current Interest 12 

House of Commons Debates of Labour Interest: A Guide . . 17 

6th Meeting, Advisory Committee on Professional Manpower 19 

A New Career for Women after 30 22 

Cost of Federal Social Welfare 23 

Industrial Fatalities, Third Quarter of 1960 25 

labour Legislation of the Past Decade— II 27 

Employment Adequacy of Older Persons 34 

Continuing Education for Women 35 

50 Years Ago This Month 36 

International Labour Organization: 

Investment in Training, Education Needed for World Peace 37 

The Trade Union Situation in the United States 38 

The Trade Union Situation in the U.S.S.R 39 

147th Session of Governing Body 41 

Teamwork in Industry 42 

Industrial Relations and Conciliation: 

Certification Proceedings 43 

Conciliation Proceedings 45 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 54 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 56 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 60 

Unemployment Insurance: 

Monthly Report on Operation 61 

Decisions of the Umpire 62 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 66 

Prices and the Cost of Living 71 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library 73 

Labour Statistics 77 



Correspondence — Address letters dealing with editorial matters to the Editor, those dealing with 
subscriptions to the Circulation Manager. Subscriptions— Canada: $2 per year, single copies 
25 cents each; all other countries: $4 per year, single copies 50 cents each; Send remittance by 
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Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa. 



EMPLOYMENT REVIEW 

ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH BRANCH 



Employment and Unemployment, December 

Employment decreased by 127,000 between November and December 
as winter weather reduced outdoor activity. Although some workers withdrew 
from the labour force as activity slackened, the number unemployed increased 
by 99,000 to an estimated 528,000. 

The labour force was 3.2 per cent larger than a year earlier, indicating 
a higher rate of growth than the long-term average. The employment increase 
over the 12-month period was 1.3 per cent, less than the long-term average. 
Unemployment in December was 122,000 higher than a year earlier. 

In the week ended December 10, the labour force was estimated at 6,430,- 
000, which is 28,000 lower than the preceding month and 199,000 higher than 
a year earlier. Employment was estimated at 5,902,000, which, although 
127,000 lower than at mid-November, is 77,000 higher than in December 1959. 

Employment 

The employment decrease between November and December was greater 
than the average, partly because of a sharp decline in agriculture, and the 
margin over year-earlier employment estimates was smaller in December than 
that established in earlier months. 

As a result of fine weather, activity in agriculture continued later in the 
year but dropped sharply in late November and early December. Farm employ- 
ment fell to 610,000, sUghtly below the figure for December 1959. Construction 
and manufacturing also experienced greater-than-seasonal employment declines. 
These declines were partly offset by increases in the service industry and by 
heavy pre-Christmas hiring in trade. Most of the workers released during the 
month were men; employment of women increased slightly. 

Employment was estimated at 5,902,000 in December, 6,029,000 in 
November and 5,825,000 in December 1959. The number of men employed 
was estimated at 4,246,000 in December, 4,385,000 in November and 4,293,- 
000 in December 1959; for women the comparable numbers were 1,656,000; 
1,644,000; and 1,532,000. 

In the goods-producing industries, average employment in the fourth 
quarter was 61,000, or 2.2 per cent lower than a year earlier. The most 
significant declines were in construction, mining, and durable goods manufac- 
turing. There was also a smaU decline in transportation and other utilities. As 
a result of continued rapid expansion in the service-producing industries, 
however, total employment was up about 1.5 per cent over the fourth quarter 
of 1959. 

Employment declined in all regions from November to December, but 
the 1960 year-end total was higher than that at the end of 1959 in all regions 
except British Columbia, where it remained virtually unchanged. 

Unemployment 

Men accounted for all of the 99,000 increase in unemployment between 
November and December. The 528,000 unemployed included 39,000 on 
temporary layoff. Of the remaining 489,000 seeking work, 74 per cent had 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 
91211-3—1 



LABOUR FORCE TRENDS _ CANADA 

JULY 1958 TO DATE 



'Originol data 



~*~ Seasonally adjusted 




\ 
1 


6,301 


Employed 








6,700, 




A 


/ V. 




/ \ 


/ \ 






/ -^ 


— — /*--'*' \ 






r-J 


-"-' \ 


1 






^ / 


1 






/ 


^^ 






,J 




















been unemployed for three months or 
less, 15 per cent for four to six months, 
and 11 per cent for seven months or 
more. 

Unemployment in December was 
8.2 per cent of the labour force, com- 
pared with 6.6 per cent the preceding 
month, 6.5 per cent a year earlier and 
7.6 per cent in December 1958. 

In the fourth quarter, 16 per cent 
of all construction workers and about 20 
per cent of all labourers were unem- 
ployed. The proportion of transportation 
workers unemployed was also above the 
national average. Unemployment rates 
were close to the national average in the 
remaining occupation groups, except for 
the office and professional group, which 
had a substantially lower than average 
rate. 

Of the total unemployed in the 
fourth quarter, about one fifth had been 
labourers, and 17 per cent had been in 
manufacturing and mechanical occupa- 
tions. Construction and office and pro- 
fessional occupations each accounted for 14 per cent of the total. (Additional 
detail on the occupational and industrial attachment of the unemployed is 
contained in the December issue of The Labour Force, a Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics pubUcation.) 

Regional Summaries 

Employment in the Atlantic region declined seasonally between November 
and December; as usual, layoffs were heaviest in construction. Lesser declines 
occurred in manufacturing, agriculture, fishing and logging. The drop in manu- 
facturing employment stemmed mainly from the seasonal reduction in activity in 
fish processing plants. A few small layoffs took place in iron and steel products 
but there were offsetting increases in employment in other parts of heavy 
manufacturing. 

At 509,000, employment in the region was 21,000 lower than in Novem- 
ber but 22,000 higher than in December 1959. Unemployment in the region 
was estimated at 69,000, an increase of 16,000 from November and of 13,000 
from December 1959. 

Non-farm employment in the region in December was an estimated 21,000 
higher than in December 1959. The improvement in non-farm employment 
over the year was mainly the result of expansion in service-producing industries. 
Employment in manufacturing showed no appreciable change over the year, 
and construction employment was considerably lower, largely because of a 
slowdown in housebuilding. 

The increase in unemployment between November and December was 
about normal for the season, although the level in December was considerably 
higher than a year earlier. Unemployment amounted to 11.9 per cent of the 
labour force compared with 10.3 per cent in December 1959. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



Employment in the Quebec region declined seasonally between November 
and December. Most of the decline occurred in the non-farm industries and 
mainly in outdoor occupations. Wood-cutting operations were reduced in 
most areas and log-hauling was not yet fully under way. The end of the naviga- 
tion season resulted in a drop in employment in transportation. Construction 
decreased seasonally but was sustained in many areas by an increasing volume 
of residential, municipal and institutional building. Activity in textiles and in 
other consumer goods industries increased seasonally but in other parts of 
manufacturing it dropped off. 

Employment was estimated at 1,622,000 at mid-December. This com- 
pares with 1,664,000 in November and 1,604,000 in December 1959. The 
estimate of agricultural employment was 122,000; of non-agricultural employ- 
ment, 1,500,000. Non-agricultural employment increased by almost 2 per cent 
over the year, largely as a result of continuing increases in the service-producing 
industries. In addition, employment derived considerable support from new 
municipal works as many municipalities this year availed themselves of the 
opportunities offered by the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program. Total 
manufacturing employment remained below last year's level and, as in the 
previous month, iron and steel products were mainly responsible for the decline. 
In the textile industry, employment remained relatively stable at a level some- 
what below that of last year. 

Unemployment was estimated at 183,000 at mid-December, compared 
with 143,000 in both the preceding month and in December 1959. Unemploy- 
ment in the region in December rose to 10.1 per cent of the labour force, 
compared with 8.2 per cent a year earlier. 

A greater-than-seasonal decline of 35,000 brought the December estimate 
of employment in the Ontario region to 2,222,000. All of the decrease occurred 
among men, most heavily in agriculture, in iron and steel plants, and among 
construction workers in those areas affected by the winter weather. During the 
month most seasonal workers in canning plants were laid off as the processing 
of most fruits and vegetables was completed. There were further employment 
reductions in shipyards and among manufacturers of heavy electrical goods. 
Rehiring continued in the automobile plants and the aircraft manufacturing 
industry, and employment in the textile industry showed some improvement. 
Employment in mining, with the exception of iron ore mining, and in paper 
mills remained stable. 

The mid-December estimate of employment in the region, 2,222,000, 
compares with the estimated 2,257,000 in November and 2,199,000 in 
December 1959. The year-to-year rise in employment of 23,000 took place 
entirely in non-farm activities. Employment of men decreased substantially over 
the year while the number of women employed was increasing by 47,000. 
Employment declined over the year in industries that employ mostly men — iron 
and steel, machinery manufacturing, agricultural implements, and housing con- 
struction — but in the service industry, employing a high proportion of women, 
it continued to expand. 

Unemployment at mid-December was estimated at 153,000; this compares 
with an estimated 127,000 in November and 111,000 in December 1959. 
Unemployment increased over the month to 6.4 per cent of the labour force; 
a year earher it was 4.8 per cent. 

In the Prairie region, employment declined seasonally from November to 
December. Favourable weather reduced the demand for help on livestock farms, 
and other farmers released men on completion of after-harvest clean-up work. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 3 

91211-3— 1-i 



In non-farm industries, seasonal layoffs continued in construction and forestry. 
A number of canneries and sugar factories completed production runs. In the 
iron and steel industry, labour requirements rose on termination of a labour 
dispute and the beginning of production of pipe for the gas pipeline projects 
in the western part of the region. Textile and garment plants were generally 
busy, but meat packing and flour milling showed some slackness. 

Construction and agriculture recorded some year-to-year employment 
declines, but these and a smaller decline in transportation were offset by 
increases in public utilities and services, bringing total employment 1 .2 per cent 
above the December 1959 level. Employment at mid-December was estimated 
at 1,032,000, compared with 1,052,000 in November and 1,020,000 in 
December 1959. In non-farm industries there was a 2.5-per-cent gain over 
the year, from an estimated 767,000 to 786,000. The year-to-year decline 
in agriculture was from an estimated 253,000 to 246,000. 

Unemployment increased seasonally, from an estimated 49,000 in 
November to 60,000 at mid-December; this was 5.5 per cent of the labour 
force. In December 1959, unemployment was estimated at 50,000 or 4.7 per 
cent of the labour force. 

In the Pacific region employment declined seasonally between November 
and December, from an estimated 526,000 to 517,000; in December 1959 
employment was estimated at 515,000. All of the decUne in the month occurred 
in non-agricultural industries, the heaviest reductions being in construction, 
logging and sawmilling. Scattered layoffs in garment plants, and seasonal 
shutdowns of canneries and other food processing plants contributed to the 
reduction in manufacturing employment. Fishermen were released as salmon 
fishing ended; herring and cod fishing continued. Shipyards rehired some men, 
and employment in mining, smelting and transportation remained steady. 

Agricultural employment remained unchanged, at an estimated 29,000; 
dairy farming provided the main activity. Employment in most non-farm 
industries was lower than a year earlier; non-agricultural employment in the 
region dechned from an estimated 496,000 to 488,000. Chief decUnes were in 
construction, forestry, and most manufacturing industries. More workers were 
employed in pulp and paper than a year ago, and the number in smelting, 
mining and services remained about the same. 

Unemployment went up seasonally, from 57,000 in November to 63,000 
in December — 10.9 per cent of the labour force. In December 1959 it was 
6.6 per cent of the labour force. 

LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate 
Balance 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 




December 
1960 


December 
1959 


December 
1960 


December 
1959 


December 
1960 


December 
1959 


Metropolitan 


9 
17 

6 
34 


4 
12 
6 

28 


3 

9 

8 

22 


8 
13 

8 
28 


2 




Major Industrial 


1 






Minor 


2 






Total 


66 


50 


42 


57 


2 


3 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-DECEMBER 1960 





SUBSTANTIAL 


MODERATE 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 




LABOUR SURPLUS 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




CALGARY -< — 


Halifax 








EDMONTON -< — 


OTTAWA-HULL -< — 








HAMILTON -< 


Toronto 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 
(labour force 75.000 or more) 


MONTREAL -< — 
OUEBEC-LEVIS -< — 
St. John's 
Vancouver-New 
Westminster 
Windsor 
WINNIPEG -< — 










BRANTFORD -< — 


Guelph 








CORNER 


Kingston 








BROOK -< — 


Kitchener 








Cornwall 


London 








FARNHAM- 


Oshawa 








GRANBY -i — 


Saint John 








FT. WILLIAM- 


SUDBURY -< 








PT. ARTHUR -< — 


Timmins- 








Joliette 


Kirkland Lake 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 


LAC ST. JEAN -< — 

MONCTON -< 

NEW 
GLASGOW -< — 


Victoria 






(labour force 25.000-75.000; 60 








per cent or more in non- 
agricultural activity) 


NIAGARA 

PENINSULA < — 
PETER- 
BOROUGH -< — 
ROUYN- 

VAL D'OR -i — 
SARNIA -<-— 
SHAWINIGAN -< — 
SHERBROOKE -< — 
SYDNEY -< — 
TROIS 
RIVIERES -< — 










BARRIE -< — 


BRANDON -i 








CHARLOllE- 


Chatham 








TOWN -< 


Lethbridge 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 

AREAS 

(labour force 25.000-75.000; 40 


PRINCE 
ALBERT -< — 


MOOSE JAW -< 

NORTH 






RIVIERE DU 
LOUP -< — 


BATTLEFORD -< — 
Red Deer 






per cent or more agricultural) 


THETFORD- 

MEGANTIC- 

ST. GEORGES-< — 
YORKTON -< — 


REGINA -< — 
Saskatoon 








BATHURST -< — 


Belleville-Trenton 


Drumheller 






BEAUHARNOIS -< 


Brampton 


Kitimat 






BRACEBRIDGE -< — 


Central Vancouver 








BRIDGEWATER^< — 


Island 








Campbellton 


Dawson Creek 








CHILLIWACK -< — 


Fredericton 








CRANBROOK -< — 


Gait 








DAUPHIN -< 


Goderich 








DRUMMOND- 


Kamloops 








VILLE -< — 


Lachute-Ste 








EDMUNDSTON -< 


Therese 








GASPE -< 


Lindsay 








GRAND FALLS -< — 


LISTOWEL -< — 








KENTVILLE -< — 


Medicine Hat 








MONTMAGNY -< 


St. Hyacinthe 








NEWCASTLE -< 


St. Jean 








NORTH BAY -< 


St. Thomas 






MINOR AREAS 


Okanagan Valley 
OWEN SOUND -< 


Simcoe 






(labour force 10.000-25,000) 


STRAlhORD -< — 








PEMBROKE -< 


SWIFT CURRENT -< — 








PORTAGE LA -< — 


Trail-Nelson 








PRAIRIE -<~ 


Walkerton 








Prince George 


Weyburn 








PRINCE 


Woodstock-Tillsonburg 








RUPERT -< 

QUEBEC NORTH 
SHORE -4 — 










Group 1 Concluded 






RIMOUSKI -< — 


SUMMERSIDE -< — 








Ste. Agathe- 
St. Jerome 


TRURO -<^ 








VAM.F.YFIELD < — 








St. Stephen 


Victoriaville 








SAULT STE. 


WOODSTOCK. 








MARIE -<~ 


N. B. -< — 








SOREL -< — 


YARMOUTH -<— 







^The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 

moved. For an explanation of the classification used, see page 983. September I960, issue. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



Current Labour Statistics 

(Latest available statistics as of January 12, 1961) 



Principal Items 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (in thousands) 

Employed (in thousands) 

Agriculture (in thousands) 

Non-agriculture (in thousands) 

Paid workers (in thousands) 

At work 35 hours or more .... (in thousands) 
At work less than 35 hours ... (in thousands) 
Employed but not at work. . . (in thousands) 

Unemployed (in thousands) 

Atlantic (in thousands) 

Quebec (in thousands) 

Ontario (in thousands) 

Prairie (in thousands) 

Pacific (in thousands) 

Without work and seeking work (in thousands) 
On temporary layoff up to 
30 days (in thousands) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts .' 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 
Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) . 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 



Date 



Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 

Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 

Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 10 

October 
October 

1st 9 mos. 
1st 9 mos. 



December 
December 
December 



October 
October 
October 
October 
December 

October 
October 



November 
November 
November 
November 



Amount 



6,430 
5,902 
610 
5,292 
4,830 

N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 

528 

69 

183 

153 

60 

63 



39 

121.4 
109.6 

83,843 
44,322 



29 

1,890 

30,280 



S76.65 

$ 1.78 

40.7 

$72.62 

129.6 

134.2 
1,584 



171.8 
153.4 
144.7 
160.8 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous 
Month 



- 0.4 

- 2.1 

- 6.0 

- 1.6 

- 1.9 

N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 

-1-23.1 
+30.2 
-1-28.0 
+20.5 
+22.4 
+10.5 

+21.9 

+39.3 

- 1.4 

- 1.8 



-50.0 
-65.6 
-43.1 



+ 0.1 

+ 0.6 

- 0.5 
+ 0.3 

0.0 

+ 0.1 

- 1.3 



- 0.2 

- 1.2 

- 1.3 

- 1.2 



Previous 

Year 



+ 3.2 

+ 1.3 

- 1.3 

+ 1.6 

+ 2.1 

N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 

+30.0 
+23.2 
+28.0 
+37.8 
+20.0 
+37.0 

+32.2 



- 2.4 

- 3.8 

- 1.8 
+ 0.9 



+31.8 
-50.7 
-46.0 



+ 2.7 

+ 2.3 

- 1.5 

+ 1.3 

+ 1.3 



0.2 
2.5 



+ 0.2 
+ 0.3 
- 2.4 
+ 2.4 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from Labour 
Force a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. See also page 983 September 1960 
issue. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 

ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH BRANCH 



As 1960 drew to a close, negotiations were in progress for the renewal 
of more than 100 major collective agreements, 15 of which were settled 
during December. These settlements provided wage increases and improved 
fringe benefits for more than 16,000 workers across Canada. The most 
significant of the 85 major agreements that remained unsettled at the end of 
the year was the one between the non-operating unions and the railways, 
affecting approximately 111,000 workers. There are 50 major agreements that 
terminate during the first three months of 1961; negotiations for renewal of 10 
of these had begun by the end of December. 

Included among the major agreements in negotiation at the end of the 
year were those covering about 7,000 Maritime coal miners represented by the 
United Mine Workers of America. The miners have been operating under the 
terms of old agreements that terminated in December 1959 and were extended 
on a month-to-month basis; the latest extension was to January 31, 1961. 
The protracted negotiations were conducted at a time when the coal industry 
was in a depressed economic state that forced substantial production cutbacks 
at some of the mines while others faced the possibiUty of closure. In the light 
of this general economic background, Dominion Coal & Steel Company offered 
a new agreement that improved some of the work rules and fringe benefits but 
left the existing wage rates unchanged. The offer, made last September, was 
accepted by the union negotiators but was rejected by the membership in a 
referendum vote. In December, the Company reportedly withdrew its offer, 
leaving the parties with the prospect of a new round of bargaining for the 
coming year. 

The first agreement to be signed between the St. Lawrence Seaway 
Authority and its 1,000 operating and maintenance employees, represented by 
the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers, 

terminated on December 31, 1960. Negotiations for renewal were initiated at 
Seaway headquarters at the beginning of the month and a number of meetings 
were held before talks were postponed until early in January. The union 
reportedly asked for a general pay increase of 5 per cent plus 7 cents an hour 
spread over three years. They also proposed that regional wage rates and fringe 
benefits be raised to the level of those at the Welland Canal, where the basic 
rate is $1.80 an hour compared with $1.60 an hour in Montreal. The Seaway 
Authority countered with an offer of a three-year agreement that would provide 
a 2-per-cent increase effective on January 1 in each of the three years. 

As the year came to a close, a conciliation oificer was appointed to help 
bring about a settlement in the negotiations between the Tobacco Workers' 
International Union and the six factories of the Imperial Tobacco Company, 

four in Quebec and two in Ontario. One of the key issues in the discussions was 
a union demand for a 35-hour week instead of the current 40 hours. The 
demand for the shorter work week was related to the introduction of 
automated processes in a number of the Company's factories. Other demands 
included a 15-cent-an-hour pay increase, 14 paid holidays instead of the 
current 12, three weeks vacation after 10 years of service instead of after 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 7 



15 years, four weeks vacation after 20 years instead of after 25, and a new 
provision for five weeks vacation after 25 years of service. 

Technological change was an issue in the collective bargaining taking place 
in the woods operations in Northern Ontario's pulp and paper industry. Opening 
up and operating camps in remote woodlands far from rail transportation and 
mill sites has proved to be expensive. Combined with the additional costly 
process of recruiting and keeping labour, the companies have recently introduced 
measures to increase mechanization. In less than five years the extensive use of 
machinery has reduced the labour content in the removal of a cord of wood 
from the forest from 1.6 man days to roughly 0.6 man days. To combat the 
resultant unemployment, the Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union, a branch of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, asked for a reduction in the 
48-hour week to 40 hours in the negotiations with Abitibi Power and Paper. 
In mid-January it was reported that an agreement was reached with the aid of 
a conciliation board. The work week was reduced to 44 hours and the wages 
were increased by 23 cents an hour for hourly paid employees and 5 per cent 
for piece workers. Other improvements included one more paid statutory 
hoUday for a total of seven, and an increase of 50 cents to a total of $2 a 
month in the company's contribution to the medical-surgical plan. Collective 
bargaining continued with the other major pulp and paper companies for new 
agreements to cover the 13,000 woods workers employed by the various 
firms involved. 

The extension of the existing health and welfare plan to provide more 
comprehensive coverage was one of the key items proposed by the United 
Rubber Workers in opening negotiations for renewal of the collective agreement 
with Firestone Tire & Rubber in Hamilton, Ontario. According to press reports, 
the union asked that the present PSI coverage, which is completely company- 
paid, be extended to include the cost of chiropractors, chiropodists, osteopaths, 
oral surgeons and dentists, and the costs of prescriptions for employees and 
their dependents. 

Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more workers, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During January, February and March 

(except those under negotiation in December, 1960) 

Company and Location Union 

Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Association Patronale du Commerce, (Hardware), 

Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Atomic Energy of Can., Chalk River, Ont Atomic Energy Allied Council (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Auto dealers (various), Vancouver, B.C Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.A. Oil, Clarkson, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.B.C., company-wide Radio & T.V. Empl. (ARTEC) (Ind.) 

C.N.R. Atlantic & Central regions Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

C.N.R. Prairie & Pacific regions Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

C.P.R. Prairie & Pacific regions Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.P.R. Prairie & Pacific regions Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Vickers (Engineering Div.) Montreal, Que. Boilermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Machinists 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Cdn. Westinghouse, Hamilton, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

CoHingwood Shipyards, CoUingwood, Ont CLC-chartered local 

Dom. Engineering Works, Lachine, Ont Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Glass, Wallaceburg, Ont Glass & Ceramic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

8 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1 96 1 



Company and Location Union 

DuPont of Can., Kingston, Ont Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Employing Printers' Assoc, Montreal, Que Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Employing Printers' Assoc, Montreal, Que Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fairey Aviation, Eastern Passage, N.S Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, New Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Halifax City, N.S Public Empl. (CLC) (inside wkrs.) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (office wkrs.) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Service Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Hammermill Paper, Matane, Que Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

H. J. Heinz, Leamington, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

HoUinger Mines, Timmins, Ont Steel workers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Walter M. Lowney, Montreal, Que Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Mclntyre Porcupine Mines, Schumaker, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Moirs Limited, Halifax, N.S Teamsters (Ind.) & Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

New Brunswick Power Commission, province- 
wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern Electric, Belleville, Ont Empl. Assoc (Ind.) (plant wkrs.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Empl. Assoc (Ind.) (phone installers) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) (plant wkrs.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, (^ue Office Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) 

Province of Saskatchewan Sask. Civil Service (CLC) (labour services) 

R.C.A. Victor, Montreal, Que I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Boniface General Hospital, St. Boniface, Man. Empl. Union of Hospital Inst. (Ind.) 

Scarborough Township, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Silverwood Dairies, Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

T.C.A., company-wide Air Line Pilots (Ind.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver Police Conmiissioners Bd., B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During December, 1960 

Bargaining 

Aluminum Co., Kingston, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Assoc des Marchands Detaillants (Produits Ali- 

mentaires), Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Babcock-Wilcox & Goldie-McCulloch, Gait, Ont. National Council of Cdn. Labour (Ind.) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Calgary Power, Calgary, Alta Empl. Assoc (Ind.) 

Canadian Vickers, Montreal, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.B.C., company-wide Broadcast Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. General Electric, Toronto, Peterborough & 

Guelph, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

C.I.L. (Ammunition Div.), Brownsburg, Que Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Cdn. Lithographers Assoc, eastern Canada Lithographers (CLC) 

Cdn. Tube & Steel, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.P.R., Atlantic & Central regions Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.P.R., company-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) (dining car staff) 

Davie Shipbuilding, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

G. T. Davie & Sons, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Dominion Coal, Sydney, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dom. Rubber (Rubber Div.) St. Jerome, Que CLC-chartered local 

Dosco Fabrication Divs., Trenton, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dupuis Freres, Montreal, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Edmonton City, Alta I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Firestone Tire & Rubber, Hamilton, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Food stores (various), Winnipeg, Man Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hopital Hotel-Dieu, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Hospitals (six), Montreal & District, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Lakehead Term. Elevators Assoc, Fort William, 

Ont Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marine Industries, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Miner Rubber, Granby, Que Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal City, Que CNTU chartered local (office wkrs.) 

Montreal City, Que Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal City, Que Public Service Empl. (CLC) (manual wkrs.) 

Old Sydney Collieries, Sydney Mines, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Prov. Hospitals, Weybum, North Battleford, 

Moose Jaw, Sask Public Service Empl. (CLC) & CLC-chartered 

local 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. (Ind.) (inside wkrs.) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 196? 9 

91211-3—2 



Company and Location Union 

Que. North Shore Paper, Bale Comeau, Franklin, 

Shelter Bay, Que Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rock City Tobacco, Quebec, Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Saguenay Terminals, Port Alfred, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Sask. Govt. Telephone, province-wide Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Shipping Federation of Can., Halifax, N.S., Saint 

John, N.B., Quebec, Montreal, Three Rivers, 

Que LL.A. (CLC) 

Singer Mfg., St. Jean, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Telegram, Toronto, Ont Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside wkrs.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside wkrs.) 

Winnipeg City, Man Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

ConcUiation Officer 

Aluminum Co., Shawinigan, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Association Patronale des Mfrs. de Chaussures, 

Quebec, Que Leather & Shoe Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

B.C. Hotels Assoc, New Westminster, Bumaby, 

Eraser Valley, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assoc, Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (beverage dis- 
pensers) 

Cdn. Car & Foundry, Montreal, Que Railway Carmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Cap de la Madeleine & 

Three Rivers, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Ste. Anne de Portneuf, Que. Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

MUl Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eastern Can. Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Goodyear Cotton, St. Hyacinthe, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Great Lakes Paper, Ft. WHliam, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel Royal York (CPR) Toronto, Ont Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Imperial Tobacco & subsidiaries, Ont. & Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marathon Corp., Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Outboard Marine, Peterborough, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Page-Hersey Tubes, Welland, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

Rowntree Co., Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Corp., Nipigon, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Shipbuilders (various), Vancouver & Victoria, 

B.C , Shipyard Wkrs. (CLC) 

Shipbuilders (various), Vancouver & Victoria, 

B.C Various unions 

Conciliation Board 

Abitibi Power & Paper, Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Aluminum Co., Arvida, Que. Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Aluminum Co., He Maligne, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Canada Paper, Windsor Mills, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Baie Comeau, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Canadian Car, Fort William, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Oilcloth & Linoleum, Montreal, Que. CNTU-chartered local 

Halifax Shipyards (Dosco), Halifax & Dart- 
mouth, N.S Marine Wkrs. (CLC) 

K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kimberley-Clark & Spruce Falls Paper, Kapus- 

kasing & Longlac, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Corp., East Angus, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

T.C.A. company-wide Air Line Flight Attendants (CLC) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

C.B.C., company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

C.N.R., C.P.R., other railways 15 unions (non-operating empl.) 

Hotel Mount Royal, Montreal, Que Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern Interior Lumbermen's Assoc, B.C Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. (Ind.) (outside 

wkrs.) 

Work Stoppage 

(no cases during December, 1960) 

10 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY I96I 



Part III— Settlements Reached During December 1960 

(A summary of the major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Coverage 
figures are approximate.) 

Assoc. Fur Industries, Toronto, Ont. — Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 3-yr. agree- 
ment covering 600 empl. — minimum rate for all categories to be increased by $6 a wk.; work wk. 
to be reduced from 40 hrs. to 38i hrs. in 1961, to 37 hrs. in 1962 and to 36 hrs. in 1963; take 
home pay will not be affected by the decreased work wk. 

Bathurst Powder and Paper. Bathurst, N.B. — Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp and 
Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) and others: 2-yr. agreement covering 800 empl. — ^wage 
increases ranging from 11^ to 15^ an hr. during the first yr. and 9^ to 12(i an hr. in the 
second yr.; the plant will operate for 8 Sundays during the first yr. and 17 additional Sundays 
during the second yr. of the agreement. 

Canadair, St. Laurent, Que. — Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agreement covering 
6,300 empl. — 2% increase retroactive to Oct. 1, 1960, plus an additional 3% increase eff. Oct. 1, 
1961; after the second increase the new rate for labourers will be $1.74 an hr.; 3 wks. vacation 
after 10 yrs. of service (previously 3 wks. after 12 yrs.); 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of 
service (previously no provision for 4 wks. vacation). 

Cdn. Westinghouse, Three Rivers, Que.— I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agreement 
covering 550 empl. — reduction of work wk. from 45 to 42i hrs. with the same take home pay, 
eff. Dec. 5, 1960; increases of 20 an hr. for female wkrs. and 40 for male wkrs. eff. in the 
mid-term of the agreement; 3 wks. vacation after 15 yrs. of service (previously no provision 
for 3 wk. vacation); the introduction of a new job evaluation plan. 

Consolidated Paper, Shawinigan, Que. — Papermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp and Paper 
Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 1-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — ll0-an-hr. increase on 
base rates retroactive to May 1, 1960, an additional 40-an-hr. eff. Nov. 1, 1960; proportional 
increases for higher classifications; 3 wks. vacation after 10 yrs. of service (formerly 3 wks. 
after 15 yrs.); 1 additional non-scheduled holiday with pay; provisions for bereavement leave 
introduced into the agreement. 

Crown Zellerbach, Richmond, B.C. — Pulp and Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 
l-yr. agreement covering 500 empl.--4% general increase eff. Nov. 1, 1960 with a minimum of 
80 an hr. on all rates; increase of 30 per hr. in the differential for the graveyard shift. 

Dominion Corset, Quebec, Que. — Empl. Assoc. (Ind.): 3-yr. agreement covering 800 
empl, — increases ranging from $3 to $5 per wk. for male tradesmen; basic rate for piece work 
empl. increased by 80 an hr.; work wk. reduced from 42i hrs. to 41i hrs. during first two 
yrs. of agreement and a further reduction to 40 hrs. for the third yr.; 2 wks. vacation after 4 
yrs. of service (previously 2 wks. after 5 yrs.); after 5 yrs. of service piece rate empl. will 
receive paid statutory holidays; the agreement includes a provision for closed shop. 

Fraser Co's., Edmundston, N.B. — Pulp and Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 1-yr. 
agreement covering 550 empl. — wage increases ranging from 120 to 160 an hr. making the new 
base rate $1.90 per hr.; 3 wks. vacation after 10 yrs. of service eff. June 1, 1961 (previously 
3 wks. vacation after 15 yrs.); an additional 8 hrs. holiday pay for Christmas shutdown; 3 days 
bereavement leave under certain conditions. 

Lever Bros., Toronto, Ont. — Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 28-mo agreement covering 
500 empl. — wage increases ranging from 5i0 to ll-i0 an hr. retroactive to Nov. 20, 1960; 
additional increases ranging from 40 to 90 an hr. eff. Nov. 1, 1961; changes in the medical plan 
provisions. 

Maritime Tel. & Tel. & Eastern Electric, company-w^ide — I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
(Plant Empl.): 1-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — wage increases ranging from $2.25 per 
wk. to $7.50 per wk.; 4 wks vacation after 35 yrs. of service (formerly no provision for 4 wks. 
vacation). 

Maritime Tel. & Tel. company-wide,— I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC), (Traffic Empl.): 1-yr. 
agreement covering 725 empl. — increases ranging from $2.25 per wk. to $5.50 per wk.; 4 wks. 
vacation after 35 yrs. of service (formerly no provision for 4 wks. vacation). 

Molson's Brewery, Montreal, Que. — Empl. Assoc. (Ind.): 3-yr. agreement covering 
1,000 empl. — minimum wages increased from $88 a wk. to $92 a wk. and the maximum rate 
increased from $107 a wk. to $111 a wk.; improved vacation allowance; provision made for 
re-opener. 

Northwestern Utilities, Edmonton, Alta. — Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) : 1-yr. agreement 
covering 500 empl. — increases in shift differentials; revision of the merit pay formula; all other 
terms of the previous agreement remain unchanged. 

Wabasso Cotton, Three Rivers, Shawinigan & Grand'Mere, Que. — United Textile 
Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agreement covering 1,900 empl. — 30-an-hr. increase retroactive to 
June 3, 1960; a further 40-an-hr. increase eff. June 1, 1961 and another 50 June 1, 1962; improved 
provision for annual paid vacations; 1 additional paid statutory holiday; time and one-half for 
Saturday work regardless of the number of hours worked during the wk. 

Winnipeg General Hospital, Winnipeg, Man. — Public Empl. (CLC): 30-mo. agreement 
covering 500 empl. — 4% increase retroactive to July 1, 1960; an additional 4% eff. Apr. 1, 1961 
and 2% eff. Jan. 1, 1962; orderlies to receive an additional increase ranging from $10 to $12 
per mo.; 3 wks. vacation after 12 yrs. of service (formerly 3 wks. after 15 yrs.); 1 additional 
paid statutory holiday making a total of 10 per yr. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 11 

91211-3— 2i 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



Deputy Minister Arthur Brown Retires, Joins ILO 



Arthur H. Brown, 
Deputy Minister of 
Labour since March 
5, 1953, retired from 
the position on De- 
cember 15, his 65th 
birthday. He had given 
the Department of 
Labour almost 18 
years of service, and 
had been in govern- 
ment service for 31 
years. 

On February 1, Mr. 
Brown will take over 
the position of Di- 
rector of the Canada 
Branch of the Interna- 
tional Labour Office, 
Ottawa, succeeding 
Douglas M. Young. 

Commenting on 
Mr. Brown's retire- 
ment, Hon. Michael 
Starr, Minister of 
Labour, said: 

"With Mr. Brown's retirement, the govern- 
ment service is losing one of its ablest 
administrators. His contribution to govern- 
ment administration over a period of 31 
years in Ottawa has been of the highest 
order stemming from a highly developed 
sense of integrity, a thorough knowledge 
of the complexities of government adminis- 
tration, and a deep-rooted consciousness of 
the responsibilities of the Civil Service in 
relation to the Government and the public. 

"Through long association 'Art' Brown, 
as he was known far and wide, gained the 
confidence of public administrators, not only 
in Ottawa, but in all the provincial capitals. 
And through his extensive work in the 
International Labour Organization, he is 
well known and respected in many other 
parts of the world. He has been at all times 
a most loyal and able counsellor." 

In 1929, Mr. Brown came to Ottawa to 
become Secretary-Treasurer and Legal Ad- 
viser to the Canadian Farm Loan Board. 

From 1939 to 1942 he was a member of 
the Dependents' Allowance Board, Depart- 
ment of National Defence; he was Chair- 
man of the Board in 1941. He also served 
during this period as a member of the 
Dependents' Board of Trustees, Department 




of National Defence. 
In January 1943 he 
became Chief Execu- 
tive Officer and Legal 
Adviser of the Depart- 
ment of Labour, and 
on April 1, 1951 he 
was appointed Assist- 
ant Deputy Minister 
of Labour. Mr. Brown 
also served as Vice- 
Chairman of the War- 
time Labour Relations 
Board and at his 
retirement was Vice- 
Chairman of the 
Canada Labour Rela- 
tions Board. 

A member of the 
National Joint Coun- 
cil of the Public Serv- 
ice of Canada from 
its inception, he also 
served a term as Chair- 
man of the Council. 
Mr. Brown was Canadian Government 
representative on the Governing Body of 
the International Labour Organization from 
1953 to 1956 inclusive, and was elected to 
serve as the Chairman of the Governing 
Body for the 1955-56 term. He also attended 
a number of International Labour Confer- 
ences at Geneva as leader of the Canadian 
Government delegation. 

Of Irish-Scottish descent, Mr. Brown was 
born at Huntingdon, Que., a son of Rev. 
and Mrs. S. Brown, on December 15, 1895. 
He moved to Saskatchewan at an early age, 
after the death of his parents, to take up 
residence with an uncle, J. T. Brown, who 
was at one time Chief Justice of the Saskat- 
chewan Court of Queen's Bench. 

Mr. Brown received his primary education 
at Moosomin, Sask., and attended high 
school in Regina. He then went to Toronto 
University, where he attended Victoria Col- 
lege until his enlistment as a gunner in 
March 1915. He served in France with the 
Canadian Field Artillery. 

Upon his discharge from the army in 
1919, Mr. Brown was articled in law in 
Regina, where he took a three-year law 
course. After his admission to the Saskat- 
chewan Bar in 1923, he practised law in 
that province until 1929. 



12 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 196 J 



Trade Minister Issues Review of 1960, Outlook for 1961 



Employment in Canada increased, on 
average, by 100,000 persons, or 1.7 per 
cent, between 1959 and 1960, and real 
earnings, on a per capita basis, maintained 
the record level of 1959, Hon. George Hees, 
Minister of Trade and Commerce, said in a 
review of Canada's economy in 1960 and 
outlook for 1961. 

During 1960 the gross national product 
established a new record, between 2 and 
3 per cent above the level for the previous 
year; prices, on the average, were up slightly 
but the total output of Canada's economy 
is higher than ever before; and personal 
incomes, in total, have risen by 3 per cent, 
he said. 

"While the year now ending has been 
one of notable achievement, there are no 
grounds for complacency," Mr. Hees added. 
"Although employment has increased, ways 
to achieve further expansion in job oppor- 
tunities must be evolved." 

Conditions of ample supply and intensified 
competition throughout the trading world 
have had a retarding effect upon the absorp- 
tion of new productive resources, he ex- 
plained. 

Merchandise exports in the first 11 
months of 1960 were 6.4 per cent higher 
than in the like period in 1959. 

Imports into Canada remained at the 
1959 level, and are now lower than four 
years ago. "Though still facing intensified 
competition from imports, Canadian manu- 
facturers, as a group, have about held their 
own in the domestic market," the Minister 
said. 

"Higher exports, together with an un- 
changed level of imports, have brought a 
substantial reduction in Canada's deficit on 
merchandise trade. This deficit amounts to 
$116 million in the first 11 months of the 
current year, compared with $410 million 
in the same 1959 period and $730 million 
in 1956." 

"A reflection of the strong forward 
momentum that underlies Canada's econo- 
mic development" can be seen in the 
additional demand stimulus that has come 
from the continuing rise in public and 
institutional investment and further growth 
in consumer purchases. 

"Expansion of business plant and equip- 
ment, while not placing additional demands 
upon the productive resources of the eco- 
nomy, has been proceeding on a major 
scale," said Mr. Hees. 

The review stated that less housebuilding 
and a diminishing rate of inventory accum- 
ulation in the business community at large 
have been important influences limiting the 



growth of over-all demand within the Cana- 
dian economy. 

There are, however, a number of strong 
sustaining forces underlying demands within 
the Canadian economy: the recent upturn in 
housing starts foreshadows a firmer trend 
in housebuilding activity; public and institu- 
tional building is continuing to expand; 
capital spending by business in 1961, invest- 
ment plans indicate, will hold close to the 
1960 level; the sustained upward movement 
in personal income should give continuing 
support to the consumer market; and the 
liquidation of inventories now taking place 
in a number of industries will provide the 
basis for a strengthening in new orders. 

These sustaining forces, he said, are being 
reinforced by the "special program to stimu- 
late Canadian development" that is now 
before Parliament: new provisions of the 
National Housing Act; improved availability 
of mortgage funds; new impetus given to 
the Winter Works Program; guaranteed 
bank loans for small businesses; establish- 
ment of the Productivity Council; the re- 
cently announced taxation proposals. 

"These and other measures will stimulate 
Canadian development and add to employ- 
ment opportunities," the Minister asserted. 

"Despite the possibility of temporary 
fluctuation in international commodity mar- 
kets," Mr. Hees said, "Canada's position 
in world trade remains basically strong. 
Rising income and consumption levels in 
overseas countries, together wiht the wide- 
spread reduction in import restrictions, has 
opened up new opportunities for the sale 
of Canadian goods." 

Vigorous action was being taken to see 
that these new market prospects are ex- 
ploited in a practical way, he said, citing 
as an example the new credit facilities 
being made available to exporters of heavy 
goods to enable them to compete on better 
terms with foreign competitors. 

The review notes that representatives of 
1,268 Canadian firms held interviews with 
Canada's trade commissioners from 49 
countries during an export trade promotion 
conference to explore all avenues leading 
to the attainment of a larger proportion of 
the world's markets for Canadian mer- 
chandise. 

In concluding his review, Mr. Hees noted 
that many countries that until recently were 
markets for Canadian goods are now com- 
petitors. The products they offer are of 
high quality and reasonably priced. 

"In order that Canada may maintain her 
present standard of living, and provide for 
full employment in her many industries. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



13 



it is essential that management and labour 
should reach an understanding that will 
enable us to produce the goods that are 
competitive in world markets. 

"Not only must we preserve the quality 
of our goods, but the price must be right . . . 

"I know I can count on management and 
labour in Canada to produce the goods that 
are competitive in both quality and price, 
and to maintain and expand our markets." 



Construction in 1961 Seen Equal 
To Building Program of 1960 

The construction industry of Canada will 
probably maintain in 1961 the $7 billion 
building program established in 1960, it 
was predicted by Jack M. Soules, President 
of the Canadian Construction Association, 
in a year-end message. 

The program will give direct employment 
to an average work force of some 580,000 
Canadians, he said. 

In making the prediction, Mr. Soules 
said it was still too early to assess the effect 
that the "baby budget" would have on the 
construction program. 

He noted, however, that the Association 
is "very glad to see the introduction of the 
principle of incentives as a means of pro- 
moting business investment in construction 
and machinery, but there is some fear that 
the effect of accelerated depreciation will 
be offset by the measures designed to reduce 
the amount of U.S. investment in Canada. 
Moreover, the double capital cost allowance 
(depreciation) may only be applied for one 
year. A lot will depend upon the Govern- 
ment's regulations which will define the 
scope of the double depreciation incentive." 

Another factor that will have a direct 
bearing on the success of the construction 
industry in 1961, but which will not be 
known for some time yet, Mr. Soules 
pointed out, will be the negotiation of new 
collective agreements on wages with the 
construction unions. 

Mr. Soules said that buyers of construc- 
tion in 1961 will be even more cost- 
conscious than ever before, and that "if a 
saving of a per cent or two in financing 
because of accelerated capital cost allow- 
ances is expected to encourage construction, 
then an increase of a similar amount due 
to higher costs will be equally successful 
in discouraging construction . . ." 

Approximately 35 per cent of the annual 
volume of construction represents expendi- 
tures by the federal, provincial and muni- 
cipal governments of the country, Mr. Soules 
said. 



Two Million Man-Hours of Work 
From Defence Jobs This Winter 

More than 2,250,000 man-hours of on- 
site employment were scheduled to be 
provided on defence construction projects 
between December 1 and March 31, it was 
announced last month by Hon. Raymond 
O'Hurley, Minister of Defence Production. 

He said that a total of some 160 projects 
would be in progress during the period. He 
placed the total value at an estimated 
$125,000,000, of which $93,000,000 was 
already under contract by December 15. 
It was expected that a further $32,000,000 
would be awarded in time so that some 
work could be done during the winter. 



All NHA Insured Loans to Have 
Anti-Discrimination Condition 

An amendment to the National Housing 
Loan Regulations under the National Hous- 
ing Act (P.C. 1960-1523), gazetted on 
November 23, makes it a condition of every 
loan made by an approved lender to a 
borrower and insured by Central Mortgage 
and Housing Corporation that in the sale 
or leasing of any house or housing unit 
constructed with the aid of the loan the 
borrower will not "discriminate against any 
person by reason of race, colour, religion or 
origin." 

The amendment provides that any com- 
plaint regarding such discrimination may be 
submitted to the Corporation, and that if 
the borrower denies that there has been 
discrimination the dispute may be referred 
to the Minister of Public Works, who may 
appoint an arbitrator to decide whether 
the borrower has broken the condition. Any 
person who is a barrister or advocate of at 
least 10 years' standing at the bar of any 
province may be appointed an arbitrator. 

The Corporation will not insure a loan 
for a borrower who has been guilty of a 
breach of the anti-discrimination condition 
within the three years immediately preced- 
ing the application to insure. 



Reach Agreement with Quebec 
On Trainining of Unemployed 

An agreement on training of unemployed 
workers registered with the National Em- 
ployment Service under the Federal-Provin- 
cial Training Program was reached last 
month by the province of Quebec and the 
federal Government. 

All provinces are now participating in 
this program. 

The training is provided under Schedule 
"M" of the Special Vocational Training 



14 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



Projects Agreement, which authorizes the 
federal Government to share with the prov- 
inces the costs of training registered unem- 
ployed for occupations that offer a reason- 
able opportunity for regular employment. 

As a result of an amendment in the 
agreement last fall, the federal Government 
is now contributing 75 per cent of the 
provincial costs of training unemployed 
workers provided a minimum volume of 
training is undertaken. 

Commenting on the agreement, Hon. 
Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, said "I 
feel that a united approach to this matter 
of training and retraining the unemployed 
will do a great deal to raise the general 
level of skills of the labour force and will 
have a beneficial effect on employment in 
this country." 

The agreement was signed on behalf of 
Quebec by Hon. Paul Gerin-Lajoie, Minister 
of Youth. 



Hospital Insurance Agreement 
Signed by Quebec Province 

An agreement was signed in Ottawa on 
December 19, extending provisions of the 
Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services 
Act to cover residents of the province of 
Quebec. 

The agreement was signed by Hon. 
Alphonse Courturier, provincial Minister of 
Health, and Hon. J. Waldo Monteith, federal 
Minister of National Health and Welfare. 

"With Quebec's entry, hospital insurance 
will be a reality in every part of Canada — 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from the 
Arctic to the American border," Mr. Mon- 
teith said. 

The program became effective on January 
1, 1961 and it is estimated that it will give 
coverage to five million persons. 

As in the case of other provinces, the 
program will include in-patient hospital 
services such as standard ward accommoda- 
tion, necessary nursing services, use of 
operating room and anaesthetic facilities, 
radiotherapy and physiotherapy where avail- 
able, drugs and surgical supplies, and diag- 
nostic procedures including necessary inter- 
pretations where these are required. 



CMA President Suggests Policy 
For U.S. Companies in Canada 

Canadian subsidiaries of American com- 
panies should be given maximum autonomy 
and scope in their operations and should 
not be treated by the parent company like 
American branches, T. R. McLagan, Presi- 
dent of the Canadian Manufacturers' Asso- 



ciation, told the National Association of 
Manufacturers at a meeting in New York 
City early in December. He was speaking 
on "The Canadian Point of View on 
Canadian-American Economic Matters." 

The CMA President mentioned seven 
points that he considered should govern the 
policies of parent companies in the United 
States toward their Canadian branches. 
These were: 

— Canadian subsidiaries should not have 
to confine their operations to the Canadian 
market alone, but should be allowed and 
encouraged to contribute to the promotion 
of Canada's increasing export trade. 

— Canadian subsidiaries of U.S. com- 
panies should use as many Canadian 
materials and component parts in their 
operations as could be used economically; 
and, in the case of concerns that produce 
raw materials, should carry out the pro- 
cessing of the product in Canada as far 
as possible. 

— Canadian subsidiaries should carefully 
consider giving Canadians the opportunity 
to participate in their growth by giving 
them a chance to buy common stock in 
the Canadian company. 

— Management decisions of American 
companies should give weight to Canadian 
interests whenever possible. 

— Canadians should be encouraged and 
trained to take an increasing part in the 
management of the Canadian companies. 

— Canadian representation on boards of 
directors should be encouraged. 

— ^American companies with subsidiaries 
in Canada should apportion more evenly 
between the two countries such ancillary 
operations as product development, engineer- 
ing, and research. 

Mr. McLagan said that he could think 
of no better way in which a parent company 
could make for successful operation of its 
Canadian subsidiary and increase good will 
between the two countries than by applying 
these seven principles. He was glad to 
acknowledge that some companies were 
already moving along these lines. 



Arthur Goldberg, Union Lawyer, 
Next U.S. Secretary of Labour 

Arthur J. Goldberg, special counsel of 
the American Federation of Labor and 
Congress of Industrial Organizations, and 
general counsel of the United Steelworkers 
of America and of the AFL-CIO's Industrial 
Union Department, was chosen last month 
to become the United States Secretary of 
Labor. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



15 



Members Approve Disaffiliation of 
B.C. Civil Service Association 

A membership vote by the British Colum- 
bia Government Employees Association last 
month approved the severing of ties with 
the B.C. Federation of Labour. 

The Association now plans to request 
re-instatement of the check-off of dues, 
abolished by the provincial Government in 
October after the Association voted in con- 
vention to continue affiliation with the 
Federation despite the latter's support of 
the new political party (L.G., Nov. 1960, 
p. 1113). 

An overwhelming majority of members 
returned ballots favouring the disaffiliation, 
temporarily effected by the officers of the 
employees association after the check-off 
was withdrawn. 

Arguments for and against affiliation were 
published in the Association's magazine 
prior to the vote. But even before the vote 
was taken, the Victoria local withdrew 
from the Victoria Labour Council. 

In November 1959 the Civil Service 
Association of Alberta ended its affiliation 
with Alberta Federation of Labour because 
of the latter's backing of Canada's new 
party (L.G. 1959, p. 1251). 



GNP Up Slightly in 3rd Quarter 
After Decline in Second 

The gross national product in the third 
quarter, at $35,272 million, registered an 
advance of less than 0.5 per cent over the 
second quarter. In the second quarter, how- 
ever, the gross national product fell by 
1.5 per cent. 

Because about half the gain was accounted 
for by a small rise in prices, the gross 
national product was very close to being 
the same as the second quarter. There was 
no change in employment between the two 
quarters. 

There was a partial recovery in business 
activity, as a result of a sharp increase in 
exports — after the sudden decline in the 
second quarter — combined with firmer 
domestic demand. 

Housing and construction turned up again 
in the third quarter after declining in the 
first and second quarters. Outlays for new 
machinery and equipment continued to 
decline, however. 

Government expenditure on goods and 
services was also an important factor in 
the recovery in domestic demand. There 
was no increase in consumer expenditure; 
outlays for durable goods declined, and 
there was only a slight increase in outlays 
for non-durable goods. 



The increase in exports and in domestic 
demand did not increase production but 
did cut present inventories. Inventory stocks 
were accumulating in the second quarter 
but showed a definite decrease in the third. 

Aside from seasonal factors, employment 
remained the same in the third quarter. 
However, with the continuing growth of the 
labour force, unemployment rose from 6.9 
per cent to 7.3 per cent of the labour force 
between the two quarters. 



CMA Recommends Reductions 
In Personal, Corporation Taxes 

Corporation and personal incomes taxes 
are now too high for the long-term develop- 
ment of the economy and should be reduced 
as soon as possible. This was one of the 
main recommendations made by the Cana- 
dian Manufacturers' Association in its 
annual brief to the federal Government, 
submitted last month. 

The brief also recommended: 

— Tax incentives, including increased 
capital cost allowances, as a means of 
encouraging natural development and in- 
creased employment. 

— Additional capital cost allowances for 
new industries beginning the manufacture 
of new products in Canada, and for exist- 
ing industries that begin the manufacture 
of goods not formerly made in Canada. 

— ^Tax adjustments to encourage exports 
and to stimulate research in Canada. 

The Association recommended complete 
abolition of special excise taxes on automa- 
biles, radios, cosmetics and a variety of 
other goods. Sales taxes levied on articles 
and materials that enter into the cost of 
producing goods should also be abolished, 
the CMA said. 

The CMA expressed concern at the flood 
of competitive imported goods, and urged 
that at the 1961 GATT Tariff Conference 
no further tariff reductions should be made 
on manufactured goods of a kind now being 
produced in Canada, and that steps should 
be taken to remove restrictions on those 
tariff items on which reductions in duty 
negotiated at previous GATT conferences 
have resulted in "too large" a share of the 
Canadian market being supplied by imported 
goods. 

The Association also suggested several 
alternative methods of controlling "exces- 
sive" imports into Canada in order to cope 
with the present serious unemployment 
situation, as well as the retention of the 
present system of Commonwealth prefer- 
ence. 



16 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



HOUSE OF COMMONS DEBATES 
A Guide to Items of Labour Interest in Hansard 



November 28 — Discussions in connection 
with the dispute between Canada's non- 
operating railway unions and the two major 
railroads described by the Prime Minister 
(p. 239). Hon. Lionel Chevrier and Hazen 
Argue comment on the statement. 

Bill C-44, to regulate extraprovincial 
transport in order to obtain the maximum 
public benefit from a truly competitive 
enterprise system, introduced and read the 
first time (p. 244). 

Second reading given Bill C-40, respecting 
loans to proprietors of small business enter- 
prises for the improvement and modern- 
ization of equipment and premises (p. 251). 
House goes into committee for clause-by- 
clause study of the Bill (p. 274) but 
adjourns without question put. 

November 29 — Bill C-40, respecting loans 
to proprietors of small business enterprises 
for the improvement and modernization of 
equipment and premises, again considered 
in committee and reported (p. 297). 

Announcement of intention to introduce 
legislation to prevent a railway strike until 
May 15, 1961 made by the Prime Minister 
(p. 310). 

Bill C-45 to provide for continuation of 
the operation of the railways, introduced by 
the Minister of Labour and given first 
reading (p. 316). 

November 30 — National Housing Loan 
Regulations have been amended with a view 
to preventing racial or religious discrimina- 
tion in the provision of housing accommoda- 
tion under the National Housing Act, the 
Minister of Public Works announces (p. 
339). 

Bill C-40 (loans to small business for 
improvements) read the third time and 
passed unanimously (p. 341). 

Second reading moved by the Minister of 
Labour of Bill C-45, to provide for the 
continuation of railway operations (p. 345). 
During debate on the motion, the Leader 
of the Opposition moves an amendment that 
would kill the Bill (p. 348). After speech 
by D. M. Fisher (Port Arthur) (p. 351) 
and the Prime Minister (p. 354), the House 
adjourns without question put. 

December 1 — Consideration continues of 
amendment to motion for second reading of 
Bill C-45 (continuation of railway opera- 
tions). After speeches by the Prime Minister 
(p. 365), Hon. Paul Martin (p. 371), 
Walter Pitman (p. 376), Hon. J. W. Pickers- 
gill (p. 377), Hazen Argue (p. 381), Hon. 
Lionel Chevrier (p. 385), Frank Howard 
(p. 389), and Harold Winch (p. 394), the 



amendment is defeated 146 to 39. After a 
closing statement by the Minister of Labour 
(p. 401), the Bill is read the second time 
and the House goes into committee for 
clause-by-clause consideration (p. 402). 

December 2 — Bill C-45 (continuation of 
railway operations) read the third time and 
passed (p. 444). Royal Assent given (p. 
483). 

Consideration in committee continues 
from November 25 of the resolution preced- 
ing introduction of a measure to provide 
federal contributions to provincial technical 
and vocational training programs (p. 464). 

Second reading moved of Bill C-9, to 
amend the Canada Fair Employment Prac- 
tices Act to extend its application to civil 
servants and other employees of the Crown 
(p. 476). The House adjourned without 
question put. 

Bill C-42 amending the National Housing 
Act to allow extension of loan repayment 
periods given Royal Assent (p. 483). 

December 6 — Resolution preceding intro- 
duction of a measure to provide federal 
contributions to provincial technical and 
vocational training programs is concurred 
in and Bill C-49 read the first time (p. 532). 

Resolution preceding introduction of a 
measure to establish a national productivity 
council is moved by the Minister of Trade 
and Commerce, who makes a statement on 
the proposed council (p. 505). 

December 7 — Unemployment Assistance 
payments to the provinces by the federal 
Government for the period January 1 to 
September 30 inclusive in the years 1957, 
1958, 1959 and 1960 are listed in response 
to a question. The totals were $4,643,950 
in 1957; $11,954,518 in 1958; $22,821,864 
in 1959; and $35,119,950 in 1960 (p. 576). 

Second reading moved of Bill C-49 
(federal contributions to provincial technical 
and vocational training programs) (p. 583). 
The House adjourned without question put. 

December 8 — Letter containing proposals 
of the federal Government respecting 
financing of the Columbia river develop- 
ment, sent December 6 to the Premier of 
British Columbia, is read to the House by 
the Minister of Finance (p. 608). 

December 9 — Consideration continues of 
motion for second reading of Bill C-49, 
respecting technical and vocational training 
assistance (p. 652). The motion is agreed 
to and the Bill is read the second time 
(p. 673). Progress reported in clause-by- 
clause consideration by the House in com- 
mittee. 



7HB LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



17 



December 12 — Report on discussions in 
British Columbia respecting the Columbia 
river development project given by the 
Minister of Justice (p. 698). 

Bill C-49 (technical and vocational train- 
ing assistance) read the third time and 
passed (p. 704). 

Following discussion at the resolution 
stage, Bill C-52, to provide for the establish- 
ment and operation of a national produc- 
tivity council, introduced and given first 
reading (p. 714). 

December 13 — Legislation to establish a 
Canadian merchant marine is being pre- 
pared, the Minister of Transport affirms 
(p. 745). 

Bill C-52, to establish a national produc- 
tivity council, given second reading (p. 747; 
p. 769). "One of the more immediate effects 
of emphasis on higher productivity now 
would be accelerated automation resulting 
in fewer jobs, not more," says Miss Judy 
La Marsh (Niagara Falls) (p. 751). 

December 14 — Consideration in com- 
mittee continues of Bill C-52 (national 
productivity council) is completed (p. 827). 
Third reading moved (p. 841). Amendment 
moved by Hon. Paul Martin to include the 
promotion of employment as one of the 
specific objects of the council (p. 842). The 
amendment is defeated (p. 860) and debate 
on the motion for third reading resumes 
but the House adjourns without question 
put. 

December 16 — Report on signing of a 
convention which establishes the Organiza- 
tion for Economic Co-operation and De- 
velopment (O.E.C.D.) is made by the 
Minister of Finance, who, together with the 
Minister of Trade and Commerce, signed 
the convention for Canada (p. 865). 

Dominion Coal Company has not changed 
its decision to close down its No. 4 coal 
mine at Cape Breton on January 14, the 
Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys 
replies to a question (p. 872). 

The question of portable pensions is con- 
stantly under study by the federal Govern- 
ment, the Minister of National Health and 
Welfare informs a questioner (p. 875). 

Bill C-52 (national productivity council) 
read the third time and passed (p. 875). 

December 19 — Statement on duty value 
modification respecting imported automo- 
biles made by the Minister of National 
Revenue (p. 911). 

Signing of hospital insurance agreement 
with Quebec announced by the Minister of 
National Health and Welfare (p. 912). 

Satisfactory progress toward agreement 
on a final text of a treaty with the United 
States concerning development of the 



Columbia River was made during talks in 
Washington on December 14, 15 and 16, 
the Minister of Justice reports (p. 916). 

Federal Government's financial proposals 
for the Columbia river development are 
unacceptable to British Columbia, the Pre- 
mier wrote on December 14; his letter is 
read to the House by the Minister of 
Finance (p. 917). 

$30,000,000 requested by the Minister of 
Labour in a supplementary estimate for the 
Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program 
(p. 950). The House adjourned before the 
question was put. 

December 20 — Contracts for construction 
of 91 small post office buildings have been 
awarded or advertised for public tender, 
the Minister of Public Works announces. 
The construction is part of the winter works 
program, he said (p. 974). 

Request of the Minister of Labour for 
the provision of $30,000,000 to finance the 
Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program 
again debated (p. 975). The resolution is 
approved (p. 985). 

The supplementary Budget did not alter 
personal income tax. Corporation income 
tax of 21 per cent was extended to apply 
to first $35,000 taxable income instead of 
first $25,000. The Budget repealed the 
4-per-cent surtax on investment from Cana- 
dian sources; did not change sales or 
excise taxes; accelerated depreciation for 
firms establishing in unemployment areas, 
or entering lines new to Canada; raised 
to 15 per cent principal withholding taxes 
on interest and dividends paid to foreign 
investors; imposed special 15-per-cent tax 
on profits of Canadian branches of non- 
resident corporations; made it necessary 
that investment companies obtain 75 per 
cent of revenues in dividends from Canadian 
corporations by 1963; made it necessary 
for pension plan trustees to derive 90 per 
cent of investment income from Canadian 
sources by 1963 to qualify for tax exemp- 
tion; forecast deficit of $286,000,000 com- 
pared with March forecast of $12,000,000 
surplus; allows university students to deduct 
tuition fees in computing income tax; pro- 
vided for stopping circumvention of tariff 
protection; forecast that net imports of 
capital would be about $1 billion, matched 
by similar excess of imports of goods and 
services over imports (p. 999). 

December 21 — The unemployed as a per- 
centage of the labour force, annual averages 
1949 and 1959 inclusive, is listed by the 
Minister of Trade and Commerce in reply 
to a question (p. 1026). 

House adjourns for Christmas recess. 



18 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



Sixth Meeting of the Advisory 

Committee on Professional Manpower 

in training of engineers and scientists in Canada, empliasis should now be put 
on producing professionals of high calibre rather than on the numbers trained, 
delegates think. Hope to speed up survey for Register of Scientific Personnel 



In the training of engineers and scientists 
in Canada the emphasis should now be on 
turning out professionals of high calibre 
rather than on the numbers trained. This 
was the view expressed by several of those 
participating in a panel discussion at the 
sixth meeting of the Advisory Committee on 
Professional Manpower, on December 12. 

Problems encountered in the training of 
engineers and scientists, and the question of 
how the supply of such professionals should 
be adjusted to the demand were discussed 
by the Committee. 

The meeting was attended by representa- 
tives of professional associations, industry, 
education, and of federal Government de- 
partments and Crown companies. 

Dr. W. R. Dymond, Director of the 
Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department of Labour, was chairman of 
the meeting. 

J. P. Francis 

Some of the measures taken by the 
Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department during the past year to make its 
Register of Scientific and Technical Person- 
nel more complete were outlined by J. P. 
Francis, Chief of the Manpower Resources 
Division of the Branch. 

His Division hopes, he said, to shorten 
still further the period required to conduct 
the survey of one third of the names in 
the register, which is carried out each year. 

The main steps taken to make the Regis- 
ter more complete were: more effective 
arrangements with the universities to obtain 
information on science and engineering 
graduates, a review of the membership lists 
of many of the professional associations, 
obtaining from large employers lists of the 
engineers and scientists in their employ, and 
improved arrangements with the National 
Science Foundation and the Institute of 
International Education in the United States 
for keeping track of .Canadian engineers 
and scientists working in that country, and 
Canadian students studying in American 
universities. 

A system of periodic mailings to persons 
on the Register, which had been developed 
with the Queen's Printer, has also helped to 
keep addresses in the Register up to date, 
Mr. Francis said. 



In 1959, the period required to complete 
the survey, which is carried out in three 
successive mailings, had been shortened to 
14 weeks. But this year it was planned to 
carry out the survey in 10 weeks from the 
date of the first mailing to the time when 
preliminary tabulations were complete. 

In 1960 each person to whom the ques- 
tionnaire had been sent had received a 
short report of the survey findings. The 
response to this move was favourable, the 
speaker said, this year the advance report 
would be mailed out some time in April. 

In the coming 1961 survey two kinds of 
information on salaries were being asked 
for. As in the past, there would be a ques- 
tion regarding earnings for the year; but 
the salary rate in January 1961 would also 
be asked for. It was hoped that tabulated 
information on the January 1961 salary 
rates would be ready by the middle of 
March. 

Another point touched on by the speaker 
was the development of arrangements for 
making joint surveys by the Economics and 
Research Branch and some of the profes- 
sional institutes. In 1959 a joint survey of 
this kind, carried out for the second time in 
conjunction with the Canadian Institute of 
Forestry, had resulted in a very high rate 
of response. In 1960 arrangements were 
made with the Royal Architectural Institute 
of Canada and the Chemical Institute of 
Canada for making similar joint surveys. 

These joint surveys were considered to 
be a solution to the question of the duplica- 
tion of effort involved in the sending out of 
similar questionnaires by more than one 
organization. 

Referring to Canadian participation in 
some of the activities of the Organization 
for European Economic Co-operation (now 
being reorganized as the Organization for 
Economic Co-operation and Development) 
in connection with scientific and technical 
manpower, Mr. Francis said that one of the 
projects in which we have participated in 
the past, and will be working on in 1961, 
concerns a survey of past, present, and 
future requirements for and supplies of 
scientific and technical manpower. Work on 
a reply to a questionnaire in connection 
with this survey would be started early in 
1961, he said. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



19 



The speaker also drew the delegates' atten- 
tion to two new occupational monographs 
published by the Branch, one dealing with 
engineering as a career and the other with 
natural science. A filmstrip in colour that 
had been prepared for use in schools in 
conjunction with the first of these mono- 
graphs was shown to the delegates during 
the conference. 

In the discussion period that followed the 
address, one of the delegates asked what the 
policy of the Branch was regarding other 
professionals such as doctors, nurses, etc. 
The Chairman said that the Branch had no 
particular policy regarding the others, since 
no great interest had so far been expressed 
by other groups. Mr. Francis remarked that 
they lacked the resources to increase the 
coverage of the survey. 

Another delegate said that a number of 
scientific groups were becoming more inter- 
ested in technicians, and asked whether 
the Branch was concerned with this. The 
Chairman replied that they had been taking 
a lot of interest in technicians, and that 
they had thought of including some groups 
of them in the Register. 

Prof. William Bruce 

"It is impossible for the undergraduate 
engineering curriculum to keep pace with 
the tremendous growth and advances in 
technology by dealing with engineering 
techniques peculiar to a given field or 
specialty, particularly as these techniques 
are constantly changing and the specialities 
multiplying like rabbits," said Prof. William 
Bruce, Chairman of the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering at McGill Univer- 
sity, who spoke on "Some Current Problems 
in the Education of Engineers in Canada." 

To attempt to give this specialized train- 
ing, Prof. Bruce continued, would mean 
having a multiplicity of "course packages." 
Under such circumstances as these, a realis- 
tic approach was being sought in the under- 
graduate curriculum "by placing emphasis 
upon the understanding and the use of 
mathematics, extending to quite high levels 
of complexity," he said. 

Owing to the increasing refinement and 
intricacy of our technical devices and the 
constant search for new scientific facts, "the 
engineer must encompass a much more 
diverse and complex body of knowledge 
than ever before." To meet this situation 
the undergraduate curriculum is trying to 
develop an understanding of "the common 
language" mathematics, and an ability to 
use this instrument in conjunction with basic 
scientific principles, the speaker said. 



"It cannot produce experts in any 
specialty, but rather by laying a good basic 
foundation it develops potential engineering 
talent." 

Prof. Bruce referred to suggestions for 
lengthening the academic year, and to the 
argument that its present length was based 
on an agricultural economy in which young 
men were needed on the farm at seed time 
and harvest. He said, however, that the 
advantages of giving students a chance to 
gain practical experience during the holi- 
days, and the fact "that learning is basically 
a physiological process and that there is a 
limit to the possible speed-up of physio- 
logical processes" should be kept in mind. 

He expressed some doubt regarding sug- 
gestions for doubling the output of students, 
with two alternating groups of students, and 
the staff working "in some sort of round- 
robin manner." Both students and staff need 
time to reflect, he pointed out. 

The speaker then spoke of the dilemma 
in which the universities were now placed, 
their need on the one hand to make room 
for increasing numbers of students, and on 
the other to avoid excessive dilution of the 
number of the teaching staff in relation to 
the number of students, to the detriment of 
the quality of education given. 

Dr. P. H. Casselman 

A short talk was given by Dr. P. H. 
Casselman, Chief, Professional Manpower 
Section, Economics and Research Branch, 
Department of Labour, on "Problems of 
Professional and Technical Manpower in 
the Far East." 

Dr. Casselman has recently returned from 
a six-month mission, sponsored by the Inter- 
national Labour Office and the United 
Nations, to Thailand, Laos, South Vietnam 
and Cambodia. The purpose of the mission 
was to assess technical nad manpower 
requirements during the next 15 to 20 years 
in connection with the development of the 
Mekong River basin. He gave an outline 
of conditions regarding professional man- 
power in that part of the world. 

A. M. Sargent 

A set of charts relating to the current 
labour market situation and the outlook 
for the employment of engineers and scien- 
tists was presented by A. M. Sargent, 
Economics and Research Branch. 

The charts showed the growth of engineer- 
ing employment in relation to the total 
labour force, and in the three main employ- 
ment sectors of industry, colleges and uni- 
versities, and government agencies. The 



20 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



growth of engineering employment in indus- 
try was also analysed by certain main 
groups. 

Other charts showed the proportion of 
the college-age population attending college, 
the proportion of college students enrolled 
in engineering, the numbers graduating in 
engineering, the net immigration of engi- 
neers, the trend of wages of the whole em- 
ployed labour force and the trend of starting 
wages for engineers, numbers of engineers 
employed, and the new supply of engineers. 

The period covered by the charts was 
from 1954 or 1955, and in some cases 
from 1951 or 1952, to 1960, with a forecast 
or projection for the coming years, where 
possible, generally up to and including 1963. 

Panel Discussion 

"Are we training too many engineers and 
scientists? was the subject discussed by a 
panel of four members, with Dr. Dymond 
acting as chairman of the panel. The mem- 
bers were: F. L. W. McKim, Assistant 
Director of Administrative Services, National 
Research Council; W. F. McMullen, En- 
gineering Personnel Manager, Canadian 
General Electric Co.; Dr. E. F. Sheffield, 
Canadian Universities Foundation; and L. M. 
Nadeau, Canadian Council of Professional 
Engineers. 

Mr. McKim objected to the wording of 
the subject of the discussion. He said that 
most of the training of engineers and scien- 
tists was done by the universities according 
to the numbers who applied for the various 
courses, and he hoped that no student who 
had an interest in science or engineering 
would be deterred by any temporary drop 
in the demand for professional engineers 
or scientists. 

Considering the need for industrial expan- 
sion all over the world, it was impossible 
for any country to train too many scientists 
and engineers, Mr. McKim contended. 
Even if a surplus did develop in one 
country it should be possible for qualified 
persons to move to other countries. 

He emphasized that there was a scarcity 
of really able people in science. Employers 
should make up their minds what level of 
ability they required, and then consider 
what salaries were needed to attract the 
kind of people they wanted. If the future 
depended on creativeness, employers would 
have to be prepared to pay for creative 
ability. 

Too much lip service was being done to 
the importance of research, and not enough 
was being done to make employment in 
research attractive, Mr. McKim thought. 



The need for scientists and engineers 
should not be over-emphasized, however. 
Students should follow their own aptitudes 
and abilities. 

Perhaps the most serious lack at present 
was in regard to high school teaching, and 
there was a shortage of able teachers in 
general, Mr. McKim said. 

There was a great lack of guidance for 
students in the choice of a career, Mr. 
McMullen said. He had found that the great 
majority of students of engineering did not 
really know what an engineer does. 

Speaking of his own firm, he said that 
their need was mainly for engineers and not 
for scientists. A high level of ability was 
needed in certain new developments in the 
industry. As to the future, the trend was 
to fewer engineers but engineers of a higher 
calibre. On the other hand, more technicians 
would be wanted. Computors would also 
take over some of the work now done by 
engineers. 

He contrasted the high regard in which 
engineers — especially "diploma engineers" — 
were held in Europe with the lower esteem 
in which they were held in this country. 
"I think we are producing too many engi- 
neers, but too few good ones," Mr. McMul- 
len said. Many who had been trained as 
engineers should have gone to an institute 
of technology instead. 

Mr. Nadeau, who had to leave the con- 
ference, left a paper, which was read by 
Mr. Francis, in which he said that at one 
time, before World War II, he thought that 
the universities were producing too many 
engineers. Later, as an employer, he thought 
that they were not training enough engineers. 
His thought now was that the universities 
were producing about the right number. 

There is now a surplus of engineers in 
Canada, but a severe shortage of technicians, 
which leads to the use of engineers in lower 
grade jobs, Mr. Nadeau said. There would 
be difficulty in finding jobs for all the 
engineers if engineers were not misused. 
Using them as draughtsmen, supervisors, 
etc., lowered the prestige of the profession. 
Computors would replace many engineers 
in routine functions, but more would be 
needed to develop, and supervise the use of 
the machines. 

Engineers will be of vital importance if 
we are to remain competitive in world 
markets, Mr. Nadeau contended. We should 
think in terms of the needs of 1965 to 
1980. We should not, however, attempt to 
control the output of engineers directly. If 
the question under debate were reworded 
to ask: Are we training too many engineers 
at the existing baccalaurean level, he would 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



21 



say, yes. But we are not training enough 
of the highly qualified engineers that will 
be needed in the years to come. 

He thought that the length of the course 
should be increased by at least one year, 
and the requirements should be tightened. 
Industry must make better use of engineers. 
The training of qualified engineering assist- 
ants should also be encouraged. 

Dr. Sheffield asked whether the federal 
Government should be more direct in its 
control of needed manpower. He referred to 
the control over the training of students 
exercised by the government in the U.S.S.R. 
In the United Kingdom, he said, somewhat 
the same thing was accomplished, though 
in a much more subtle way. There, com- 
mittees investigated the needs of the country 
for various kinds of skilled people. The 
government responded to the recommenda- 
tions of these committees by putting up the 
money to develop the particular facilities 
needed. The universities had responded in 
their turn, but later they had decided that 
special emphasis was no longer needed. 

In the United States, the National Defence 
Education Act 1958 was designed to stim- 
ulate the education of scientists and engi- 
neers. In Canada, the establishment of the 
National Research Council has encouraged 
the development of facilities and the training 
of scientists. Dr. Sheffield said, while national 
health grants were producing the same 
results in the health field. Finally, the 



Canada Council was encouraging training in 
the arts. Courses offered in technological 
institutes stimulated the training of tech- 
nicians. 

But are we using these devices as effec- 
tually as we should and in the right places? 
he asked. Besides providing training, furnish- 
ing information about the country's needs 
was another way to stimulate the supply of 
trained manpower. 

Private inquiry. Dr. Sheffield said, had 
shown that many sources of information 
regarding future demand for chemists, engi- 
neers, and teachers of science were available, 
but many agencies were not well informed 
as to what these sources were. He ques- 
tioned also whether present information was 
sufficient to guide students and to indicate 
what training facilities were needed. 

One fact that had emerged from this 
discussion, Dr. Dymond said in commenting 
on the views expressed by the panel mem- 
bers, was that this was a tremendously com- 
plicated question. The question arose 
whether the supply of professional man- 
power should be left to be decided by the 
choice of individuals or whether the social 
need should be considered. The point had 
been brought out, however, that there must 
be a relation between supply and demand. 

Later he said that he did not know 
"whether our tools of prediction will allow 
us to tell people what to expect in the 
future." 



A New Career For Women After 30 



To obtain information about women who undertake professional training after age 
30, necessary for evaluation of effects of their experience on educational and 
social practice. Women's Bureau conducts survey of such students in social work 



To obtain information about women who 
undertake professional training after the 
age of 30, a prerequisite for any evaluation 
of their experience and its effects on educa- 
tional and social practice, the Women's 
Bureau of the Department of Labour car- 
ried out an inquiry into the experience of 
such women who had taken professional 
social work training. A report of the inquiry 
has now been published under the title, 
A New Career After 30. 

The survey demonstrated "the capability 
and promise of a group of women past 30 
who were challenged to prepare for more 
productive work in the profession of their 
choice." To disregard the potential of such 
women, and of others in their age group 
who may not have had a university educa- 
tion, "is to limit individual growth and at 



the same time lose to the nation a con- 
siderable resource of intelligent and dedi- 
cated womanpower," the report says. 

Among the obstacles met by the women 
who replied to the questionnaire were the 
difficulty of the married women to cope 
with a full schedule of study along with 
the demands of home and family, and the 
temporary loss of income or pension entitle- 
ment. 

Few married women with family respon- 
sibilities are able to give undivided time to 
work outside the home, the bulletin says. 
"If such women are to be enabled to make 
their contribution to the working world, 
adjustments are required of both the em- 
ploying agency and the woman herself." 

Too many women who re-enter the 
labour force or change their occupation 



22 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



after the age of 30 disregard the importance 
of adequate preparation for a new career, 
it was found from the survey. "It may be 
fairly asked whether society values the 
potential contribution of such women highly 
enough to take the necessary steps to 
encourage and assist them ... To do so 
would require re-orientation of vocational 
counselling and preparation for girls and 
women, and acceptance of the fact that the 
employment of women with family respon- 
sibilities requires adaptations such as part- 
time work schedules and supervised school 
lunches for children," the booklet asserts. 

The inquiry took the form of a question- 
naire sent out to a number of women whose 
names were supplied by eight schools of 
social work across Canada. These women 
were students who, since 1950-51, had 
undertaken training in social work at 30 
years of age or over. Replies were received 
from 152 of them. 

In the report the replies to the various 
questions asked are summarized, and an 



appendix gives notes on the experience of 
several individual women. 

Chapters in the report are headed: Intro- 
duction, The enquiry, The women who 
replied, How far they went in social work 
training, What happened to them after 
training, Why they chose social work, 
Advantages and disadvantages that they 
found, and Conclusions. 

The appendix contains notes on the 
experience of a former teacher, a nurse, a 
former office worker, "one who had seen the 
results of war, one who had been prepared 
for social work by her religious experience 
and her profession, a mother who found a 
second career, a newcomer to Canada, and 
one who made the most of her opportunity." 

The report was published in the hope that 
it "may be an encouragement to other 
women who are moved to similar under- 
takings and also that it may provide useful 
insights for those concerned with the educa- 
tion and recruitment of women for profes- 
sional work." 



Cost of Federal Social Welfare 

Government contributory pension plan with graduated benefits could overcome 
most limitations of present employee plans, says Dr. R. M. Clarke of University 
of British Columbia in address on expenditures on six social welfare programs 



A government, contributory pension plan 
with graduated benefits can overcome most 
of the limitations of present employee pen- 
sion plans in providing substantial pensions 
for employees at retirement age, said Dr. 
Robert M. Clark, Associate Professor of 
Economics and Political Science, University 
of British Columbia, in an address to the 
14th Annual Conference of the Canadian 
Tax Foundation, Toronto, 1960. 

He was speaking on "Federal Government 
Expenditures on Social Welfare." 

(Dr. Clark was appointed by the federal 
Government in January 1958 to make a 
study of pension plans in the United States 
that might be used in Canada. His report 
was tabled in the House of Commons on 
March 5, 1959.) 

"If American experience with old-age, 
survivors, and disability insurance is a 
guide," he continued, "Canada could in a 
few years have a contributory pension pro- 
gram with graduated benefits covering 90 
per cent of the population." 

There are three major limitations of 
employee pension plans, which, although 
their coverage has increased rapidly in the 
past two decades and they are now operating 



in establishments with about three million 
employees, cover only about 60 per cent of 
that number. Dr. Clark said. 

The three limitations mentioned were: ( 1 ) 
coverage is incomplete, because the self- 
employed are excluded; many persons, under 
voluntary plans, decide not to participate; 
and some persons are excluded by age 
restrictions or by a waiting period; (2) 
vesting is inadequate, because in a typical 
employee pension plan the employee leaving 
before completing 10 years of service with 
an employer does not get back the em- 
ployer's contribution; (3) the option of 
cash withdrawals on changing employers 
is exercised by the overwhelming majority 
of employees. 

"The consequences of the last two limita- 
tions is that a substantial proportion of 
employees may work for a succession of 
employers with pension plans providing 
generous benefits for the long-term em- 
ployee, and still reach retirement with a 
very meagre pension," he pointed out. 

In addition to coverage of 90 per cent 
of the population, a government, contribu- 
tory plan would presumably provide for 
immediate vesting and the option of taking 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



23 



cash withdrawals would presumably not 
exist. "These points were accepted without 
significant controversy both in the United 
States and in the United Kingdom," Dr. 
Clark stated. 

Benefits under a contributory pension pro- 
gram with graduated benefits, whether gov- 
ernment or private, build up slowly. A 
government program can avoid a long period 
for maturity of benefits in only one of two 
ways, or a combination of them, the speaker 
said. One way is by the payment of large 
subsidies from the government's general 
revenues in the plan's early decades; the 
other is to require future generations of 
contributors to pay contributions at a sub- 
stantially higher rate for a given level of 
benefits than the first two generations are 
required to pay. The inevitable price of 
both alternatives is higher taxes or con- 
tributions in the long run. 

The disadvantages of employee pension 
plans can be overcome, as far as employees 
are concerned, by direct government regula- 
tion of the plans. Under the British North 
America Act, the provinces have the right 
io do this; but no provincial government has 
yet exercised this right, although the Premier 
of Ontario has appointed an advisory com- 
mittee "to explore ways and means by 
which retirement pension plans can be made 
more effective, provide more security for 
our older people and minimize those inhibi- 
tions which militate against the employment 
of the older worker." 

If the provinces enact regulatory legisla- 
tion, "a very considerable part of the case 
for a contributory federal pension plan 
with graduated benefits disappears," Dr. 
Clark asserted. 

Here he pointed out that the advantages 
of a government flat-rate pension plan were 
the obverse of those of the contributory 
plan with graduated benefits: a flat-rate plan 
does more to help those who most need 
help and does it at a much lower adminis- 
trative cost. 

Dr. Clark's remarks on pension plans 
came after he had speculated that "either 
next year or the year thereafter the present 
federal Government is likely to announce 
its intention of" raising the old age security 
pension, or introducing a system of flat 



survivor benefits for widowed mothers, chil- 
dren dependent upon widowed mothers, 
and women becoming widowed at an age 
when it would be difficult for them to enter 
or re-enter the labour market, or introducing 
a contributory pension program with gradu- 
ated benefits to supplement the present 
flat-rate benefit program. 

A government, contributory pension plan 
with graduated benefits could be modelled 
on the American old-age, survivors and dis- 
ability insurance program in not allowing 
contracting out (not permitting employers 
and employees to refrain from contributing 
where an existing employee pension plan 
is more generous) or modelled on the 
British National Insurance Act of 1959 in 
allowing contracting out. 

There were so many variables involved 
in these alternatives that he had not 
attempted to predict the cost of any of 
them. He did, however, estimate the cost for 
1961-62 of the federal Government's six 
social welfare programs: old-age security, 
family allowances, old-age assistance, blind 
persons' allowances, disabled persons' allow- 
ances, and unemployment assistance. 

He estimated that in fiscal 1961-62 old 
age security would cost $617 million, family 
allowances $524 million, unemployment 
assistance $47 million, old-age assistance 
$31 million, disabled persons' allowances 
$17 million and blind persons' allowances 
$4 million, a total of $1,240 million. This 
is an increase of $84 million over total 
expenditures during fiscal 1959-60. 

"The estimated cost of old-age security 
in 1961-62 is almost 50 per cent of the 
total cost to the federal Government of the 
six programs. Of the estimated increase of 
$85 million, one half is for old-age security," 
he pointed out. 

The "earmarked" contribution for old-age 
security should be more than sufficient to 
pay for the estimated costs in 1961-62. In 
1960, for the first time, it was possible to 
finance old-age security pensions without 
dipping into consolidated revenue, he said. 

But the remaining $623 million of the 
estimated total expenditure in 1961-62 will 
have to come from consolidated revenue, 
Dr. Clark declared. 



24 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



Industrial Fatalities in Canada 

during the Third Quarter of 1960 

Deaths from industrial accidents numbered 305 in tliird quarter, an increase of 
37 from tiie previous quarter but a decrease of 84 fom 1959's third quarter. 
As in second quarter, largest number of fatal accidents was in construction 



k 



There were 305* industrial fatalities in 
Canada in the third quarter of 1960, accord- 
ing to the latest reports received by the 
Department of Labour. This is an increase 
of 37 from the previous quarter, in which 
268 were recorded, including 48 in a sup- 
plementary list. In the third quarter of the 
previous year, 389 fatalities were recorded. 

During the quarter under review, there 
were three accidents each resulting in the 
deaths of three or more persons. 

On August 15, the pilot, a geologist and 
two of his assistants were killed when their 
aircraft crashed after taking off at Lorna 
Lake near Kamloops, B.C. 

Three workmen removing stumps and 
roots from the bottom of a ravine at Mc- 
Bride, B.C., died of asphyxiation on Sep- 
tember 7 when a mud slide buried them. 

The pilot and two Quebec Provincial 
Police detectives were killed when their 
plane crashed a few minutes after taking 
off near Ste. Jovite, Que., on September 22. 

Grouped by industries (see chart page 
26), the largest number of fatalities — 
63 — ^was recorded in construction: 28 each 
in buildings and structures and highways 
and bridges and 7 in other construction. 
For the same period last year, fatalities 
in this industry numbered 87: 48 in build- 
ings and structures, 30 in highways and 
bridges and 9 in other construction. During 
1960's second quarter, 48 fatalities were 
listed: 30 in buildings and structures, 10 
in highways and bridges and 8 in other con- 
struction. 

There were 50 fatalities in the mining 
industry during the quarter: 26 in metal 
.jnining, 10 in coal mining and 14 in 
'non-metallic mineral mining. During 1959's 
third quarter, 39 fatalities were recorded 
of which 22 were in metal mining, 7 in 
coal mining and 10 in non-metallic mineral 
mining. Thirty-nine workers were killed in 
this industry in the second quarter of 1960: 

* See Tables H-1 and H-2 at back of book. The 
number of fatalities that occurred during the third 
quarter of 1960 is probably greater than the figure 
now quoted. Information on accidents which occur 
but are not reported in time for inclusion in the 
quarterly articles is recorded in supplementary lists 
and statistics are amended accordingly. The figures 
shown include 75 fatalities for which no official 
reports have been received, including 25 in agri- 
culture alone. 



26 in metal mining, 8 in coal mining and 5 
in non-metallic mineral mining. 

During the quarter, accidents in the trans- 
portation, storage and communications 
industry resulted in 49 deaths; of these, 
there were 16 each in railway transportation 
and local and highway transportation, 8 in 
water transportation, 5 in air transportation 
and 4 in storage. During the same period 
last year, 52 deaths were reported, 20 of 
which were in railway transportation, 18 in 
local and highway transportation and 2 
each in air transportation, storage and com- 
munications. Accidents in this industry dur- 
ing April, May and June of 1960 caused 
the deaths of 33 workers; of these, there 
were 8 each in railway transportation and 
local and highway transportation, 7 in water 
transportation, 5 in air transportation, 3 
in storage and 2 in communications. 

Forty-three fatalities were recorded in 
manufacturing, of which 11 were in iron 
and steel products, 10 in wood products, 7 
in paper products, 4 in foods and beverages, 
3 each in transportation equipment and 
chemical products, and 2 in non-ferrous 
metal products. During 1959's third quarter, 
68 fatalities were recorded in this industry, 
of which 19 were in iron and steel products. 



The industrial fatalities recorded in these 
quarterly articles, prepared by the Working 
Conditions and Social Analysis Section of 
the Economics and Research Branch, are 
those fatal accidents that involved persons 
gainfully employed and that occurred during 
the course of, or arose out of, their employ- 
ment. These include deaths that resulted 
from industrial diseases as reported by the 
Workmen's Compensation Boards. 

Statistics on industrial fatalities are com- 
piled from reports received from the various 
Workmen's Compensation Boards, the Board 
of Transport Commissioners and certain 
other official sources. Newspaper reports 
are used to supplement these data. For those 
industries not covered by workmen's com- 
pensation legislation, newspaper reports are 
the Department's only source of information. 
It is possible, therefore, that coverage in 
such industries as agriculture, fishing and 
trapping and certain of the service groups is 
not as complete as in those industries that 
are covered by compensation legislation. 
Similarly, a small number of traffic acci- 
dents that are in fact industrial may be 
omitted from the Department's records 
because of lack of information in press 
reports. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



25 



INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES IN CANADA 
Third Quarter of 1960 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 



Construction 

Mining and Quarrying 

Transportation, Storage 
and Communications 

Manufacturing 

Agriculture 

Service 

Logging 

Public Utilities 

Fishing & Trapping 

Trade 

Finance 



BY INDUSTRY 



10 



20 



30 40 50 60 



70 



Struck by Machinery, 
Movina Vehicles, etc. 

Collisions, Derailments, 
Wrecks, etc. 

Falls and Slips 

Caught In, On or Between 
Machinery, Vehicles, etc. 

Electric Current 

Conflagrations, Temperature 
Extremes and Explosions 

Inhalations, Absorptions, Asphyx- 
iation and Industrial Diseases 

Miscellaneous Accidents 

Striking Against or 
Stepping on Objects 

Over-Exertion 



Source: Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour. 



80 90 100 

— 1 



mma^.-iwri-iVMY 






BY CAUSE 



26 



IHl LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



12 in wood products, 6 each in non-ferrous 
metal products and non-metallic mineral 
products and 5 each in transportation equip- 
ment and electrical apparatus products. 
During the second quarter of 1960, 32 
fatalities were recorded; of these, 10 were 
in wood products, 6 in iron and steel prod- 
ucts, 5 in paper products and 4 in non- 
metallic mineral products. 

Twenty-six fatalities were recorded in 
agriculture, la decrease of 22 from the 48 
that occurred during the same period in 
1959 and an increase of 3 from the 23 
listed during the second quarter of 1960. 

An analysis of the causes of the 305 
fatalities during the third quarter (see chart 
page 26) shows that 78 (26%) were 
under the heading "struck by", 13 were 
the result of being "struck by tools, machin- 
ery, cranes, etc.", 21 were caused by 
"moving vehicles" and 44 were in the 
category "other objects". "Collisions, de- 
railments, wrecks, etc." were responsible 



for 75 deaths: 28 from accidents involving 
automobiles and trucks, 33 tractors and 
loadmobiles, 9 aircraft, 14 railways and 1 
involving watercraft. In the category "falls 
and slips", 66 fatalities were recorded, all 
but six of which were caused by falls to 
different levels. Twenty-seven fatalities were 
the result of being "caught in, on or be- 
tween"; of these, the categories "hoisting 
or conveying apparatus" and "automobiles 
and trucks" had 6 each, 8 involved machin- 
ery and trains and other railway vehicles 
and 3 involved belts, pulleys, lines, chains, 
etc. Electric current was responsible for 18 
deaths, 2 of which were caused by lighten- 
ing. 

By province of occurrence, the largest 
number of fatalities was in Ontario, where 
there were 107. In British Columbia, there 
were 51; in Quebec 44 and in Alberta 36. 

During the quarter, 98 fatalities were 
recorded in July, 106 in August and 101 in 
September. 



Labour Legislation of the Past Decade -II 

Second of series of articles reviewing developments in labour legislation in 
Canada in 1951-60 period concludes review of labour standards legislation and 
deals with enactments during past decade concerning private employment agencies 



The Legislation Branch of the Depart- 
ment of Labour has prepared a review of 
developments in labour legislation in Canada 
in the past decade, to supplement the article 
"Fifty Years of Labour Legislation" that 
appeared in the 50th Anniversary Issue of 
the Labour Gazette. The review is being 



published in instalments, of which this is 
the second. 

The first instalment, which appeared in 
last month's issue, covered labour standards 
legislation. This instalment completes the 
review of labour standards legislation and 
deals with legislation concerning private 
employment agencies. 



Part 1- Labour Standards (cont'd) 

School Attendance and Employment of Young Persons 



In the period under review, changes in 
school attendance laws and laws governing 
employment of young persons had the effect 
of fixing a higher age for compulsory 
school attendance in some provinces, and of 
strengthening the already considerable body 
of legislation for the protection of young 
workers. 

School Attendance 

Each province has a compulsory school 
attendance law requiring children to attend 
school up to 14, 15 or 16 years, as the 
case may be, unless they have reached a 
certain level of education, and prohibiting 
the employment of school-age children dur- 
ing school hours. In all cases, exemptions 
from school attendance are permitted in case 



of illness, distance from school or lack of 
accommodation and, except in British 
Columbia, under specified conditions for 
home duties and for employment. 

Between 1950 and 1960 the school-leaving 
age was raised in several jurisdictions. In 
Manitoba, a 1950 amendment to the School 
Attendance Act authorized a school board 
having an attendance officer to pass a by-law 
requiring attendance to the age of 16, 
instead of 15, as authorized under previous 
legislation. Where a higher age is not fixed, 
the school-leaving age in Manitoba is 14 
years, but children betweeen 14 and 16 
must attend school if not regularly employed 
in industry, household duties or farm 
work. The minimum school-leaving age 
was raised from 14 to 15 years in New- 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1 96 J 



27 



foundland in 1951, and in 1959 Prince 
Edward Island made it compulsory to send 
a child to school to the age of 16 rather 
than 15, as previously. 

Employment of Young Persons 

In 1951, following the example of British 
Columbia and Prince Edward Island, Nova 
Scotia passed a general child labour law 
prohibiting employment of children below 
a specified age. 

The Nova Scotia Employment of Chil- 
dren Act prohibits the employment of 
children under 14 in certain undesirable 
employments — manufacturing, ship-building, 
electrical works, construction, the forestry 
industry, garages and service stations, hotels 
and restaurants and the operation of eleva- 
tors, theatres, dance halls, shooting-galleries, 
bowling-alleys, billiard and pool rooms. The 
Act also places restrictions on the employ- 
ment of children in other occupations, pro- 
viding that no child under 14 may be em- 
ployed to do any work that is likely to be 
harmful to his health or normal develop- 
ment or such as to prejudice his attendance 
at school or capacity to benefit from school 
instruction. 

In non-prohibited occupations, the hours 
of children under 14 years are limited to 
eight in a day when school is not in session 
and to three on a school day, unless an 
employment certificate has been granted. 
Work and school may not occupy more than 
eight hours of any day, and work between 
10 p.m. and 6 a.m. is prohibited. (An em- 
ployment certificate may be issued under the 
Education Act to a child over 13 years who 
satisfies the school board that he needs to go 
to work or who, in the board's opinion, will 
not profit from further schooling.) 

In 1950, the Alberta Labour Act, which 
already prohibited the employment of a 
child under 15 in any factory, shop or office 
building (shop includes a hotel or res- 
taurant), was amended to forbid work in 
any other employment by a child under 15 
without the approval of the administrative 
board. Since 1957 the written consent of 
the parent or guardian has also been 
required. In 1954, an exemption was author- 
ized for a child under 15 who is excused 
from school attendance for the purpose of 
securing vocational training through em- 
ployment. 

These restrictions on child employment 
were relaxed somewhat in 1957 by an 
amendment to the Act giving the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council power to make regula- 
tions permitting the employment of chil- 
dren under 15 in specific occupations, sub- 
ject to the protection afforded by the Child 
Welfare Act. 



Under this authority, regulations were 
issued permitting the employment of a child 
over 12 in certain safe occupations under 
specific safeguards, namely, that the work 
should not be injurious to the child, that 
the parent or guardian should give written 
consent, that working hours should not 
exceed two on a school day or eight on any 
other day, and that no work should be 
performed after 8 p.m. If these conditions 
are met, a child may be employed in any 
of the following occupations: clerk in a 
retail store, delivery boy or girl for a retail 
store, vendor of newspapers and small 
wares, water boy on a construction project, 
clerk or messenger in an office, express or 
despatch messenger, shoe-shiner, gardener 
and landscaper. 

In 1955, the coverage of the British 
Columbia Control of Employment of Chil- 
dren Act, enacted in 1944, was extended 
to the laundry, cleaning and dyeing indus- 
try. This Act, which prohibits the employ- 
ment of children under 15 in specified 
industries or occupations except under 
permit from the Minister of Labour, applies 
to the main types of industrial and com- 
mercial employment, including shoe-shine 
stands, public places of amusement and 
service stations. 

In 1957, when Manitoba consolidated its 
main labour laws into one statute, the 
Employment Standards Act, some changes 
were made in the provisions regulating the 
employment of young persons. 

As before, the employment of a child 
under 15 was forbidden, except with a 
written permit from the Minister. The Act 
also stated that no child might be employed 
in such a manner, or upon such work or 
service, that his safety, health or moral 
well-being might be hurtfully affected. 

With respect to factories, the minimum 
age for employment of boys was raised 
from 14 to 15, the age formerly set for 
girls; there is no provision for exemption 
by permit. Birth certificates are required 
for the employment of all adolescents under 
18. Formerly, they had been required only 
up to the age of 16. In addition, the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council was given 
authority to prohibit the employment of 
boys and girls under 18 (formerly, girls 
under 18, boys under 16) in a factory in 
which the work is considered dangerous 
or unhealthy. 

Two provinces set higher age limits 
for underground work in mines. In 1951 in 
Newfoundland the minimum age for em- 
ployment underground was raised from 13 
to 18 years. In 1951 Nova Scotia raised 
the minimum age for underground work in 
metal mines from 16 to 18 years; in 1954, 



28 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



in coal mines from 17 to 18 years. In New 
Brunswick, in 1955, in the first regulations 
made for metal mines, a minimum age of 
18 years was set for employment under- 
ground. 

Family Allowances 

The federal Family Allowances Act, 1944, 
which provides for the payment of a monthly 
allowance to every Canadian child up to 
his 16th birthday, is an effective means of 



limiting employment of children and of 
ensuring school attendance. Payment of an 
allowance ceases when a child fails to 
attend school, and a child who is legally 
absent from school cannot work for wages 
and receive an allowance. 

In 1957, the scale of payments under the 
Act was raised to $6 a month for all 
children under 10 years of age, and $8 
for those between 10 and 16 years. Pre- 
viously, the allowances were $5, $6, $7 or 
$8, depending on the age of the child. 



Protection of Wages 



All provinces have statutory provisions 
designed to ensure that workers receive the 
wages due them. This is in addition to a 
considerable body of legislation (general 
wages Acts in three provinces, provisions of 
the Alberta Labour Act, provisions of Mini- 
mum Wage Acts and orders, the British 
Columbia Semi-monthly Payment of Wages 
Act) regulating the manner and frequency 
of payment of wages, the deductions that 
may be made from earnings, the furnishing 
of pay statements and other related matters. 

With regard to the protection of wages, 
one province. Alberta, has wage security 
legislation to protect workmen against de- 
faulting employers in two of its basic indus- 
tries — coal mining and lumbering. Under 
federal fair wage legislation and similar 
legislation in five provinces applying to 
works of construction performed under 
Government contract, provision is made for 
the payment of wages to employees in case 
of default by the contractor from moneys in 
the hands of the Crown for securing the 
performance of the contract. 

Five provinces, through Masters and 
Servants Acts or their more modern equiv- 
alent, Wages Recovery Acts, provide a 
summary procedure for the recovery of 
unpaid wages. In some jurisdictions there 
is special legislation giving priority to wage 
claims in bankruptcy (a purely federal 
matter), the voluntary winding-up of a 
company and similar eventualities. There is 
also legislation in most provinces protecting 
a portion of a worker's wages from attach- 
ment or assignment. A Mechanics' Lien Act 
in each province (provisions of the Civil 
Code in Quebec) gives "mechanics" and 
labourers a lien for work done in the erec- 
tion of any building or the performance of 
any other work of construction. Several 
provinces also have Woodmen's Lien Acts. 

In the period between 1950 and 1960, 
the Alberta wages security legislation was 
amended; the Saskatchewan, Alberta and 
Manitoba wages recovery Acts were revised; 
and the scope of the British Columbia Semi- 



monthly Payment of Wages Act was ex- 
tended to give additional protection to 
workers. 

The Alberta Industrial Wages Security 
Act requires employers in the coal mining 
and lumbering industries to furnish wage 
security in the form of cash or bonds to 
the Minister of Labour before beginning 
operations each year. The amount of security 
normally required is the largest monthly 
payroll in the previous year of operation. 
An employer who has defaulted in the 
payment of wages may be required to 
furnish additional security. A defaulting 
employer who has been ordered by the 
Minister to cease operations, as provided 
for in Section 12 of the Act, must deposit 
twice the amount of his largest monthly 
payroll during the preceding year. 

In 1951 the requirements of the Act were 
relaxed to some extent when it was provided 
that, at the Minister's discretion, the pay- 
ment of security might be made in instal- 
ments. This amendment was designed to 
aid small operators who had a good record 
of compliance with the Act but who some- 
times found it difficult to furnish the entire 
amount of the security before the beginning 
of their operations. 

The Minister also has discretionary power 
to exempt an employer from liability to 
furnish security if the Provincial Auditor 
certifies that he is satisfied with the em- 
ployer's financial position and ability to pay 
the wages of his employees. A 1960 amend- 
ment to the Act gave the Minister authority 
to waive the security provisions without a 
certificate if the employer has not defaulted 
on any wage payments for a period of three 
years immediately preceding the application 
for exemption. 

Employers must make out monthly returns 
showing whether or not workmen have been 
paid in full. Where wages are owing to 
workmen, the security in the hands of the 
Minister is available for payment. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



29 



As previously indicated, five provinces — 
Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, On- 
tario and Saskatchewan — have Acts which 
provide for the collection of wages through 
the making of a complaint before a justice 
of the peace or a police magistrate. This 
procedure, first set out in the Masters and 
Servants Acts of the nineteenth century, 
involves only nominal costs and is a simpler 
and more direct remedy than an ordinary 
civil action. 

The magistrate is authorized to conduct a 
hearing, summoning the employer to appear 
before him to answer the claim. In some 
provinces the claim may be investigated 
whether the employer appears or not. If 
the magistrate is satisfied that a proper 
claim exists, he may order payment by the 
employer of wage arrears and costs. In case 
of non-payment, the magistrate may issue 
a distress warrant for levying the wages 
and costs by seizure and sale of the em- 
ployer's property. 

Some of these Acts have not been 
changed for many years, and for that reason 
do not afford a practical means of redress 
to workers for unpaid wages under modern 
conditions. The maximum amount of wages 
that may be recovered in British Columbia 
under this procedure is $50 and costs, and 
in Ontario $200 and costs. However, during 
the fifties several provinces brought their 
Acts more into conformity with present-day 
conditions. In 1951 Saskatchewan replaced 
the Masters and Servants Act by the Wages 
Recovery Act, which in turn was replaced 
in 1957. Alberta passed- a new Masters and 
Servants Act in 1954, and in 1960 Manitoba 
amended its Wages Recovery Act, raising 
the ceiling to enable claims up to $500 to 
be handled by this summary procedure. 
The previous limit was $200. 

The Saskatchewan Wages Recovery Act 
of 1951 provided substantially the same 
procedure for the recovery of wages as the 
former Masters and Servants Act but the 
limit on the amount of wages that could 
be collected was raised to $200. It had 
previously been $100, with provision for 
the payment of an additional four weeks' 
wages in case of improper dismissal. In 1954 
the ceiling was raised to $400, and in 1957 
it was increased to $500 (plus costs). This 
limitation does not apply, however, to an 
employer who is subject to the Minimum 
Wage Act, which in effect means that the 
$500 ceiling applies only in agriculture and 
one or two other types of employment. 

In 1955 the Saskatchewan Act was 
amended to make it a more effective instru- 
ment for the recovery of wages by incor- 
porating in it the procedure set out in other 
labour standards laws of the province for 



the collection of wages by Department of 
Labour inspectors. These provisions permit 
the employer to make voluntary restitution 
of wages owing to an employee. If in the 
course of his regular duties an inspector 
finds that an employer has failed to pay 
wages due, he may determine the amount 
owing and, if the employer and employee 
agree as to the amount, the employer is 
required to pay the wages to the Deputy 
Minister of Labour within two days. The 
money is then payable to the employee but 
if he cannot be located, it is placed in a 
special account and, if not claimed within 
two years, becomes part of the Consolidated 
Revenue Fund. An employer who com- 
plies with these provisions is not liable to 
prosecution. 

Unlike some of the other legislation, the 
Alberta Masters and Servants Act places a 
ceiling on the wage claims that may be 
heard by a magistrate. In 1954 this was 
set at six months' wages or $500, whichever 
is the lesser. At the same time the same 
limit was placed on the amount of wages 
that a magistrate may order paid. The 
magistrate may direct payment of a further 
amount, not in excess of four weeks' wages 
or $100, whichever is lesser, and costs for 
improper dismissal. Alternatively, he may 
order payment of whatever wages the em- 
ployee would have earned between the date 
of his dismissal and the date of the deter- 
mination of the complaint or $100, which- 
ever is lesser, and costs. 

In Alberta, proceedings under the Act 
must be taken within six months after the 
termination of the employment or within six 
months after the last instalment of wages 
has become due, whichever is later. In 
Saskatchewan, the time-limit was extended 
in 1956 to one year after employment ceases 
or six months after the last instalment of 
wages has become due, whichever date is 
the later. 

Most of the Acts provide for appeals. 
In Saskatchewan, a magistrate's order may 
be appealed to a judge of the District Court. 
In Manitoba, appeals are limited to cases 
where the amount in question is over $20 or 
where the magistrate has taken into con- 
sideration loss or damage to the employer. 

In British Columbia, the principal instru- 
ment for the recovery of unpaid wages is 
the Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act, 
first enacted in 1917. This Act requires an 
employer to establish at least two regular 
pay-days per month. It provides further that 
each payment must cover all wages earned 
by the employee up to a day not more than 
eight days before the pay-day. On summary 
conviction, in addition to a fine, the Court 
may require the employer to pay to the 



30 



THB LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



employee concerned all arrears of wages, 
and in default of payment may order sale of 
the goods and chattels of the employer by 
distress. 

Already applicable to mining, manufac- 
turing, logging, construction and the fishing 
industry, the Act was extended to cover 
hotels and catering in 1953. In 1957 its 
application was further widened to include 
a number of service industries and occupa- 
tions, wholesale and retail trade, the trans- 
portation and taxicab industries and office 
occupations, the thought being that as far 
as possible all workers in the province should 
be covered by the Act. The Act does not 
cover any worker earning $4,000 or more 
under a yearly contract. 



For most of the occupations and indus- 
tries now under the Act a requirement that 
wages are to be paid at least as often as 
semi-monthly is also set out in minimum 
wage orders. Under a minimum wage order, 
however, only the minimum wage and not 
regular pay may be recovered. 

In mines under the Coal Mines Regula- 
tions Act payment must be made on Satur- 
day and not less often than every fortnight. 

In British Columbia, as in several other 
provinces, an action against an employer 
for arrears of wages must be brought within 
six months after the date of the alleged 
offence. 



Notice on Termination of Employment 



In 1951 Manitoba amended its Hours of 
Work Act to make it mandatory, in all 
industries except farming, for employers 
to serve notice of dismissal and for em- 
ployees to give notice of termination of 
employment. Under these provisions, the 
amount of notice varies with the pay period, 
but, except in the case of a person paid 
less frequently than once a month, may 
not be less than one regular pay period. If 
employees are paid less often than once 
a month, reasonable notice must be given. 
Notice of termination is not required if an 
employee is hired for a fixed period. 

In 1957, when these provisions were 
incorporated into the Employment Standards 
Act, two new provisions were introduced. 
One permits an employer to establish a 
practice under which he and his employees 
may agree to terminate employment with a 
shorter period of notice than that provided 
for in the Act. The practice will be con- 
sidered officially adopted on the expiry of 
one month after the employees have been 
notified in writing, and by the posting of a 
notice, of the terms of the practice. New 
employees must be told of the practice when 
hired. 

The other new provision established an 
alternative procedure for dealing with com- 
plaints that employment has been terminated 
without the proper statutory notice. Instead 
of initiating court action, an aggrieved 
person may make a written complaint to 
the Minister, who may look into the facts 
himself or refer the matter to the Manitoba 
Labour Board. If the person charged does 
not admit that he failed to give notice, a 
hearing may be held, after which the 
Minister or Board may dismiss the charge 
or make a declaration stating the amount 
of money due. An appeal may be made to 
a magistrate against such a declaration 



within 30 days. The magistrate may reverse, 
amend or cancel any order and his decision 
is final. 

The only other provinces to make statu- 
tory provision regarding notice on termina- 
tion of employment are Saskatchewan and 
Quebec. 

In Saskatchewan, provisions requiring em- 
ployers to give notice are contained in the 
Minimum Wage Act. These forbid an em- 
ployer to discharge or lay off an employee 
who has been in his service for three months 
or more without giving him at least one 
week's written notice. "Lay-off" is defined 
as a temporary dispensation by an employer 
with the services of an employee for a 
period exceeding six consecutive days. One 
week's wages may be given in lieu of notice. 
This requirement applies to all occupations 
except farm labour and domestic service. 

In respect of the period of notice, the 
employer must pay to the employee his 
actual earnings during the week or a week's 
normal wage, exclusive of overtime, which- 
ever is greater. Where an employee's wages 
vary from week to week, his average weekly 
wages, excluding overtime, for the preceding 
four-week period may be taken as his 
normal wages. 

In Quebec, under Section 1668 of the 
Civil Code, a domestic servant, journeyman 
or labourer engaged by the week, month 
or year who intends to leave his employ- 
ment must give a week's notice if hired by 
the week, two weeks if by the month, and 
a month's notice if by the year. The em- 
ployer must give similar notice where an 
employee's services are no longer required. 
However, a worker may be discharged 
without notice if he is paid the full amount 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



31 



of wages to which he would have been 
entitled had the required notice been given. 
Some decrees under the Quebec Collec- 
tive Agreement Act require the giving of 
notice on termination of employment. 



In the other seven provinces, the common 
law principle that either party is entitled 
to "reasonable" notice is generally followed. 
What is reasonable is usually determined 
by the pay period. 



Fair Wages 



During the 1951-1960 period, British 
Columbia revised its fair wage legislation, 
the legislation enacted to ensure the pay- 
ment of fair wages on government contracts. 
New Brunswick adopted a fair wage law 
and the federal Government amended the 
regulations under the Fair Wages and Hours 
of Labour Act. 

No new principles were introduced, how- 
ever. The basic philosophy of this type of 
legislation is that workers engaged in gov- 
ernment construction work should be paid 
such wages as are generally accepted as 
current in the district. 

In 1951 British Columbia passed the 
Public Works Fair Wages and Conditions 
of Employment Act, which incorporated the 
fair wage policy first adopted by a resolution 
of the Legislature in 1900 and the provisions 
of the former Public Works Wages Act, 
which was designed to ensure the carrying 
out of the fair wage policy by empowering 
the Government to withhold any payments 
due to a contractor who had failed to pay 
proper wages. 

Under this Act, all persons employed by 
a contractor or subcontractor on Govern- 
ment construction work must be paid "fair 
wages" and their woricing hours may not 
exceed eight in a day and 44 in a week, 
except in emergencies. The same conditions 
must be observed on public works subsidized 
by the Government. 

"Fair wages and conditions of employ- 
ment" are defined as the wages and condi- 
tions of employment that are generally 
accepted as current for workmen in the 
district in which the work is being per- 
formed. If the work is to be carried out 
in a district where no current wages or 
labour conditions have been established, the 
Minister of Labour may set the rates of 
wages and conditions under which persons 
working on the contract are to be employed. 
Any dispute as to what wages are to be 
accepted as current may be referred to the 
Minister for settlement. 

One of the major changes made by the 
new Act was to centralize the fair wage 
policy for public works contracts in the 
Department of Labour. Under the previous 
legislation, wage clauses had been inserted 
in public works contracts by the contracting 
department, which was also responsible for 
their enforcement. The responsibility of 



determining what was a fair wage had been 
left to the Department of Labour. Under 
the present Act, responsibility for adminis- 
tration rests entirely with the Department of 
Labour. 

The Minister may require a contractor to 
file with him, not later than the 15th day 
of each month, a list of his workmen, 
showing their wage rates, and the amounts 
paid and owing to each employee for the 
previous month. An employer who fails to 
submit the required information is liable 
to a penalty. The Minister, however, may 
waive this penalty or reduce the amount 
as he sees fit. 

The New Brunswick Fair Wages and 
Hours of Labour Act, which was enacted 
in 1953, also requires contractors and sub- 
contractors engaged in construction work 
for the provincial Government to pay their 
employees "fair wages". By "fair wages" is 
meant the current wages paid to other 
workmen performing the same class of work 
in the same district. 

As under the British Columbia Act, a 
contractor must observe an eight-hour day 
and a 44-hour week. Apart from the hours 
set in industrial standards schedules, which 
cover only designated trades in a few 
areas, this is the only legal limitation on 
hours of male employees in New Brunswick. 
Hours may be extended only with the per- 
mission of the Lieutenant-Governor in 
Council or where an emergency is declared 
by the Minister. The Lieutenant-Governor 
in Council has authority to fix an overtime 
rate in such cases. 

A government department or Crown cor- 
poration contemplating the letting of a 
contract must advise the Minister of Labour 
of the nature of the work and the classes 
of employees likely to be employed. It is the 
Minister's responsibility to prepare fair wage 
schedules that will apply to the work to be 
done. If the same class of work is not being 
performed locally, the Minister may prepare 
minimum wage schedules instead. 

As is the practice in other jurisdictions, the 
contractor is required to post fair wage 
schedules and to keep records of wages. De- 
partmental inspectors inspect public works 
projects and if any violations are disclosed 
may direct payment of wages due. If neces- 
sary, the Minister may withhold up to 25 
per cent of the payments owing or such 



32 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



lesser amount as he deems sufficient to 
satisfy the wage claim. Before final settle- 
ment, the contractor is required to submit 
a sworn statement that wage rates have 
been in accordance with the schedule and 
that no wages are in arrears. 

In 1960, the regulations under the federal 
Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act were 
amended by the addition of a new provision 
regarding overtime. Unless the Minister of 
Labour orders otherwise, employees working 



on federal Government construction con- 
tracts must be paid time and one-half the 
wage required to be paid under the contract 
for hours worked beyond the 44-hour weekly 
limit set by the Act. This premium rate is 
also payable for all hours worked in excess 
of eight in a day, if the Minister so orders. 
Previously, no specific overtime rate had 
been set, but the Minister had authority to 
set an overtime rate under special circum- 
stances. 



Part 2 -Private Employment Agencies 



In the past decade, Manitoba, British 
Columbia and Ontario replaced their legis- 
lation dealing with private employment 
agencies to take changing conditions into 
account. All three new Acts provided for 
government regulation of employment agen- 
cies in order to prevent abuses. 

Manitoba's former legislation, first enacted 
in 1918, had provided for the establishment 
of a Government Employment Bureau and 
prohibited the operation of any private fee- 
charging agency. In 1950 provisions regard- 
ing the Government Employment Bureau 
were repealed in view of the operation in 
the province of offices of the National Em- 
ployment Service set up under the federal 
Unemployment Insurance Act, and a new 
statute, the Employment Services Act, was 
enacted. It provides that every employment 
agency operated by a person, association or 
municipal or other corporation must be 
licensed by the Department of Labour, 
whether or not it charges a fee, and the 
licence must be renewed annually. 

The earlier legislation in British Columbia 
and Ontario, also passed between 1910 and 
1920, provided for the licensing of private 
employment agencies. In other provinces 
laws were enacted in the same period pro- 
hibiting the operation of private fee-charging 
employment agencies altogether. Such laws 
are still on the statute books in Alberta, 
New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Saskat- 
chewan. In Quebec, the first such law, 
passed in 1910, provided for a Provincial 
Employment Service, and prohibited the 
operation of any private agency without a 
licence. The Provincial Employment Service 
has been continued. Services to job seekers 
and employers are provided free of charge. 
British Columbia replaced its legislation 
in 1955. The Employment Agencies Act 
enacted in that year requires employment 
agencies to register annually with the 
Department of Labour, and prohibits an 
agency from charging any person seeking 
employment a fee for procuring employment 
for him or for providing him with informa- 
tion regarding employment. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

91211-3—3 ' 



• JANUARY 7961 



As a result of considerable criticism of 
private employment agencies in the late 
1950's, Ontario repealed its legislation in 
1960 and enacted a new statute, the Em- 
ployment Agencies Act. The Act provides 
for government supervision of all employ- 
ment agencies, through the requirement 
that every agency, including any person 
carrying on a counselling or aptitude-testing 
service, must obtain a yearly licence from 
the Department of Labour. 

The Employment Agencies Act provides 
only a framework of rules for the licensing 
and supervision of employment agencies, 
leaving more detailed requirements to be 
prescribed by regulation. Among the matters 
to be dealt with by regulation are the 
qualifications of applicants for licences, 
the fee that may be charged by employment 
agencies, and provision for inspection. 

With respect to the qualifications required 
of an applicant for a licence, the Act lays 
down the general criteria that an applicant 
must pay a licence fee, furnish security and 
satisfy the Supervisor of Employment Agen- 
cies (the licensing authority) that he is 
"worthy of public confidence". Where, after 
a hearing, a licence is refused, suspended or 
revoked, an appeal may be lodged in the 
County or District Court. 

Like some of the earlier legislation, the 
Manitoba and British Columbia Acts permit 
some exceptions, exempting registered trade 
schools which try to secure employment for 
their students, and agencies which operate 
for the sole purpose of hiring employees 
for one employer. Trade unions are also 
exempted in British Columbia. 

In British Columbia and Manitoba, an 
employment agency is prohibited from 
sending any person seeking work to any 
place of employment where a legal strike 
or lockout is in progress without informing 
him of the fact. 

The British Columbia legislation contains 
definite requirements concerning the keep- 
ing of records and makes provision for 

{Continued on page 40) 

33 



Older Workers 



Employment Adequacy of Older Persons 

Many older workers can and do perform successfully far Into advanced years but 
with advancing years kind of jobs they can hold down will change and range of 
jobs they can do will narrow, says Ewan Clague, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 



Many older workers can and do perform 
successfully far into advanced years; the 
kind of jobs they can hold down will change 
with advancing age, and the workers must 
therefore shift jobs and occupations in 
order to continue to be effective workers; 
and, "with advancing age, the range of 
jobs that can be performed successfully 
becomes narrower and more limited; so, 
there is a need for a constant matching 
process by which the useful powers of the 
aging worker can be fitted into jobs that 
he can perform well," said Ewan Clague, 
Commissioner of Labor Statistics, United 
States Department of Labor, in an address 
to the 10th Anniversary Meeting of the 
National Committee on the Aging. 

"Industry in general does a good job of 
protecting older workers who are already 
employed," he said, and pointed to statistics 
derived from a study by his Bureau of the 
installation of electronic data processing in 
20 offices. The results of the study were 
published in a bulletin, Adjustments to the 
Introduction of Office Automation. 

About 2,800 employees were in the units 
affected by the new electronic data process- 
ing; 1,500 of them had no change at all in 
their jobs; nearly 900 had their positions 
changed, either through reassignment within 
the unit or through transfer to other units 
of the company. The remaining 400 left 
the companies, about three fourths of them 
by quitting and the others by retirement, 
death or layoff; only nine were laid off. 

Slightly less than half of the workers 
under age 45 were kept in their old positions; 
nearly 70 per cent of the workers over 
age 45 were retained. One third of the 
younger group were reassigned or trans- 
ferred compared with one fourth of the 
older group. Nearly 18 per cent of the 
younger group were separated, only 7 per 
cent of the older group. The greater majority 
of the older group who were separated 
retired, less than 1 per cent were voluntary 
quits, and none of this group was laid off. 

The Commissioner enumerated three 
dimensions of the older worker problem. 
First, people are different: some older 
workers are excellent, some just good, and 
some aren't good. "Perhaps the last group 
never were very good. If they weren't good 
workers in their thirties, why should we 
expect them to be so in their sixties?" 



Second, as there are differences among 
workers, so there are differences among 
jobs, in the qualifications and requirements 
needed to perform them satisfactorily. Older 
workers cannot, any more than younger 
workers, perform adequately in any job 
that happens to be open, Mr. Clague pointed 
out. "If the job is different from those he 
has held before, it may be quite beyond 
the range of his capabilities." 

This brings up the third dimension: 
change over time, both in a man's abilities 
and in the job. A man can work and earn 
a living in any one of the three ages of 
the working man — 18-45, 45-65, 65 and 
over — "but it is a rare individual who can 
perform at high-level competence in all 
three periods in the same occupation . . ." 

To make it more complicated, new 
materials, new inventions and new methods 
all produce changes in the work to be 
performed. 

Many workers are in jobs that will re- 
quire substantial readjustment when they 
are about age 45, because the type of work 
in which they are successful in their younger 
years will not be available to them after 
they have reached their physical peak. These 
workers may need to take training or re- 
training, or further education, or make 
other readjustments to enable them to hold 
down a new job or occupation. 

As for the worker beyond age 65, the fact 
that a person is old does not constitute 
evidence that he cannot work successfully, 
but it is equally true that his declining 
capacities are continually narrowing the 
fields in which he can work. 

"So the problem of the older worker in 
general is that they face the prospect of 
having to adjust their declining capacities 
to new and different jobs and occupations," 
which means periodic shifting, of men and 
jobs. 

Here Mr. Clague quoted U.S. Secretary 
of Labor James P. Mitchell: 

"Employment policies in America must 
be based on the individual, not on any 
group myth. The nation must not be 
deprived of an invaluable resource, the 
proven ability of its older workers, at a 
time when we are in a global economic 
contest." 



34 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



Women's Bureau 



Continuing Education for Women 



Most women, like men, complete their education or vocational training before 
entering the labour force as youthful workers, but most women work for only 
a few years following their schooling then quit the labour force for 15 years 

degrees, higher degrees and career changes 
are all frequently mentioned. 

Another goal is to help all under-graduate 
students prepare for lives that will include 
a career, marriage and responsibilities to 
the community. Since this goal conflicts with 
traditional attitudes, group discussions rather 
than the lecture method have been adopted 
in the class room. The response has been 
enthusiastic; senior students have commented 
that they have never before had a chance to 
think out these questions under the guidance 
of a trained person. 

The Institute of Independent Study, to be 
inaugurated at Radcliffe College, Harvard 
University, in the fall of 1961, is designed 
to give highly educated women new oppor- 
tunities and a professional outlet for their 
talents. 

One group of women, to be called "asso- 
ciate scholars", most of them PhDs, will be 
required to show that they have in mind 
"purposeful activity in a specific field of 
work." Twenty "scholars" are to be selected 
in 1961 and paid $3,000 a year for part- 
time attendance at the Institute. It is ex- 
pected that most of them will be talented 
women whose careers have been inter- 
rupted by marriage or some other circum- 
stance, and who find it difficult, if not 
impossible, to return to sustained intellectual 
activity. The Institute will assure them time 
free from personal pressures and obligations, 
a place to work, all the facilities of a great 
university, and the companionship and 
guidance of renowned authorities in many 
fields. 

In addition to the "associate scholars," 
it is also intended to bring together a 
smaller group of distinguished women who 
have already done notable scholarly or 
creative work. Known as "resident fellows," 
they will come from any part of the world 
and live at the college for periods of from 
one to five years, having the opportunity 
to pursue some long-range research or 
artistic project they might not otherwise be 
able to enter upon. It is also hoped that 
they will act as a subtle but powerful force 
in the lives of undergraduate and graduate 
students, by giving them a longer view of 
their own future. These women will be 
paid $10,000 a year. 



Most women, like men, complete their edu- 
cation or vocational training before entering 
the labor force as youthful workers. But most 
women work only a few years following school, 
then drop out of the labor force for 15 to 
20 years while rearing a family. Family and 
home management could be construed as job 
experience only in a limited number of fields — 
possibly including nursing, dietetics, and hotel 
management; skills once learned in other fields 
rarely survive 20 years of cold storage. There- 
fore, some writers suggest that a new approach 
to vocational education of women appears 
necessary; young women might be counselled 
to acquire skills which will keep; higher educa- 
tion might be delayed until just before re-entry 
into the market; refresher courses or inter- 
mittent work experience might be offered to 
women during their housebound years.* 

Some of these newer approaches are 
illustrated by experiments in continuing 
education for women recently developed 
in a number of universities in the United 
States. 

Late in 1959, with the aid of the Ford 
Foundation, a pilot project was launched at 
Douglass College of Rutgers, the State 
University of New Jersey, to test ways and 
means of retraining women for professional 
work after their children are grown. Initially, 
efforts are being centred on tutoring former 
housewives for jobs in the field of mathema- 
tics; later, studies will be extended into 
other fields. 

A comprehensive program for the con- 
tinuing education of women at the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota is a first attempt to use 
all the resources of a university to fit the 
life cycle and time-table of adult women. 
Special scheduling of courses and experi- 
mental teaching methods are being tried, 
at first in courses of special interest to 
women in two categories — homemakers, 
housebound by family responsibilities who 
wish to complete a university degree and 
employed women whose primary interest 
is cultural growth. 

About 190 students registered up to the 
fall of 1960. Their ages range from 18 to 
62; some are single while one woman has 
a husband and seven children. Their educa- 
tional backgrounds vary from high school 
graduation to some work toward a PhD. 
Their ambitions are equally varied. Personal 
enrichment, vocational upgrading, bachelor's 



1. The Changing Woman Worker by Georgina M. 
Smith, Institute of Management and Labor Rela- 
tions, Rutgers 1960, page 14. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

91211-3— 3i 



• JANUARY 7967 



35 



From the Labour Gazette, January 1911 



50 Years Ago This Month 

Edmonton Trades and Labour Council requests investigation of conditions in tlie 
construction camps along route of Grand Trunk Pacific Railway west of the city 
and F. J. Plant of the Department of Labour sent to investigate the complaints 



Bad living conditions and prevalence of 
typhoid fever in the construction camps 
along the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific 
Railway west of Edmonton, insufficient food 
and poor accommodation for the men 
while en route to their place of employment, 
and delay in paying those who had been 
laid off or had quit their jobs were com- 
plained about in a letter from the Edmon- 
ton Trades and Labour Council received 
by the Minister of Labour on October 10, 
1910. 

The letter referred to "disgraceful" con- 
ditions, which had been "going from bad 
to worse for some months;" an epidemic 
of typhoid fever that had been going on 
in the camps all the summer, and from 
which "many men have died;" and "scores 
of cases" in which the Board of United Aids 
in Edmonton had had to advance money 
to men to tide them over until their pay 
cheques came. 

The letter asked for a thorough investiga- 
tion of the matter by the Department. The 
Secretary of the Trades and Labour Con- 
gress of Canada, P. M. Draper, also wrote 
to the Minister on October 19 supporting 
the request for an inquiry. 

As a result of these representations, an 
officer of the Department, F. J. Plant, was 
sent to Edmonton to investigate the com- 
plaints. His report was published in full in 
the Labor Gazette of January 1911. 

Mr. Plant stayed in Edmonton from 
November 16 until November 21 making 
inquiries and interviewing a number of 
persons, then went to Wolf Creek, 117 miles 
further west. There he first visited the 
main offices of the contractors for the 
mountain division of the GTP, and then 
went on to see the camps for himself. 

Besides making a thorough inspection of 
the camps, he had meals with the men 
during his stay. As a result of his investiga- 
tions he decided that there was nothing 
to support any serious complaints about 
living conditions. 

Mr. Plant next investigated the complaints 
about inadequacy of food and accommoda- 
tion on the train from Winnipeg to the 
place where the work was going on, a 
journey that took about two days. He found 
that the men were commonly hired through 
employment agencies in Winnipeg and else- 



where; had their train fare of $10 advanced 
to them, to be deducted from their first 
month's pay; and were expected to provide 
themselves with food for the trip. 

The fact that a good many of the men 
had not provided themselves with food was 
apparently the chief cause of hardship on 
the trip. Although there was a good deal 
of testimony to the effect that the men had 
been warned that they must supply their 
own food, many contended that they had 
not understood this. 

An employee of the contractors who 
accompanied the men on these trips stated 
that he told the men to bring food with 
them. Many had done so, he said; but others 
had bottles of liquor, which, the report 
said, "they claimed were all they desired." 

The report said that the proper way would 
be to provide food for the men when a 
journey took more than two days. It also 
advised that the men's baggage be checked 
at the beginning of the journey and given 
to the owners at their destination. This, it 
was suggested, would help to prevent deser- 
tion en route, which the employers com- 
plained was common. One of the men's 
complaints was that they were locked in 
the train at Edmonton station. This, the 
railway company said, was to prevent them 
from "being left behind." 

On investigation, Mr. Plant found that 
the complaints of delay in paying wages of 
men who had left the work applied to the 
Grand Trunk Railway, which was doing the 
track-laying and ballasting, and not to the 
contractors, who were responsible for the 
grading. The delays appeared to be partly 
due to the company's cumbersome method 
of payment. 

Investigating the complaints of typhoid 
fever, Mr. Plant found that out of 60 cases 
brought to hospitals in Edmonton during 
August, September and October, only 14 
patients were men who had been working on 
the railway. 

Visiting the hospitals set up to serve 
the camps, he found that from April 1 to 
November 25, 1910, there had been 253 
fever cases, of which 25 had been fatal. 

To put the matter in perspective, the 
report pointed out that during this period 
there had been an average of about 2,500 
men in the camps at all times, and a turn- 
over of about 10,000. 



36 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



Investment In Training and Education 

Said Urgently Needed for World Peace 

ILO Director-General says training in skills together with education to equip 
peoples of developing nations with capacity to understand the changes going on 
are of first importance and cannot await a solution of problem of disarmament 



Education and training, coupled with an 
adequate understanding of the changes going 
on in the world, are of "the first importance 
at the present phase of world development," 
especially in the underdeveloped countries 
of the world, David A. Morse, Director- 
General of the International Labour Office, 
told delegates to the international congress 
marking the 80th anniversary of the Organi- 
zation for Rehabilitation through Training. 

A massive investment in training and 
education is urgently needed to overcome 
the threats to world peace and cannot await 
solution of the intricate problem of dis- 
armament, Mr. Morse declared. 

Attempts at industrialization of the under- 
developed countries without proper con- 
sideration of the human factor in that 
development could lead to dislocation and 
disorder, he said. 

There were two parts to the problem: 
First, people must be equipped with the 
necessary skills — mechanical, scientific and 
technical knowledge. "It is estimated," said 
Mr. Morse, "that the underdeveloped coun- 
tries need quickly an additional one million 
highly trained technicians, administrators 
and managers — what we would call 'strategic 
manpower' — if they are to be able to absorb 
investment adequate to maintain an accept- 
able minimum of economic growth, a mini- 
mum which would insure that production 
keeps a little ahead of population growth. 

"This requires a massive investment in 
training and education. Moreover, to this 
is to be added the need for many more 
millions of skilled workers whose training 
must be organized." 

The second part of the problem, Mr. 
Morse pointed out, is that people must be 
equipped with the capacity to understand 
the changes going on around them con- 
stantly, to make themselves a conscious 
part of the process of change, and to build 



together the kind of institutions through 
which they can control and channel 
economic growth. 

"A purely technical education alone is 
not enough. Indeed, it may be a dangerous 
thing if not balanced by a social education 
which gives a better understanding of the 
new world technology is helping to create." 

Mr. Morse said that new forms of human 
co-operation need to be developed: the 
institutions of an industrial society — trade 
unions, industrial organization, the struc- 
ture of industrial relations, a new organiza- 
tion of social security. 

In this there is no universal pattern to 
be followed; each people must work out its 
own course. "But education is the root of 
the capacity for any people to work out 
its own salvation. 

"Without a sound basis of social educa- 
tion among its leaders," continued the 
speaker, "any community whose traditional 
way of life is disturbed by new forces will 
fall into the void of unreason, fantasy and 
violence. Social education is today, in my 
view, the most essential underpinning for 
the growth of freedom in the newly-emerg- 
ing countries." 

Mr. Morse described as "one of the great 
revolutionary acts of our time" the decision 
of the major industrial powers to share their 
wealth and knowledge with the developing 
countries in a program of aid for economic 
development. 

But the "great and immediate" changes 
brought about by the programs "strain the 
fabric of stability, peace and freedom. Great 
expectations of a better future have been 
aroused among the peoples of the under- 
developed countries; yet the means of ful- 
filling these expectations have not yet been 
created . . . 

"This is why education and training are 
of first importance at the present time." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



37 



The Trade Union Situation in the United States 



"The trade union movement in the United 
States is a strong force in the economic, 
social and political life of the community. 
With few exceptions trade union rights are 
secure and freedom of association is a 
reality." This was one of the findings of a 
mission sent by the International Labour 
Organization to study freedom of association 
in the United States, the report of which 
has just been published. 

The mission was one of a series that has 
been undertaken by the ILO, in accordance 
with a decision of the ILO Governing Body 
in March 1958 (L.G. 1958, p. 385), to 
provide for a continuing survey of condi- 
tions relating to freedom of association in 
member states. The surveys are being made 
on the spot at the invitation of the govern- 
ments of member countries, and the United 
States was the first country to invite the 
ILO to make such a survey. 

The mission, headed by John Price, Chief 
of the Freedom of Association Survey Divi- 
sion of the ILO and Special Assistant to 
the ILO Director-General, was in the United 
States from March to June 1959. It spent 
some time in Washington and New York, 
and visited 21 other cities in 12 states. 

It met officials of government agencies, 
trade union leaders and members, leaders 
and members of employers' organizations, 
labour arbitrators, university professors, 
journalists, and others; visited factories; 
attended union meetings; and was present 
at meetings of congressional commissions. 

The mission's report, pointing out that 
the nature of the trade union movement in 
any country can be understood only as part 
of that country's national life, emphasized 
that "one of the important things to remem- 
ber about the American trade unions is that 
they are American." 

American trade union membership 
amounts to some 18,000,000 — about a third 
of the non-agricultural working force — 
organized in nearly 80,000 local unions, 
most of which belong to national unions 
covering a particular occupation or industry, 
the report states. There are nearly 200 of 
these national organizations, most of which 
are affiliated with a single federation, the 
AFL-CIO. 

The report contains a thorough analysis 
of American labour legislation, but it points 
out that it is not easy to give a clear picture 
of the law relating to freedom of association 
owing to its extent and the various jurisdic- 
tions involved. 

Although the mission believed that the 
trade union movement in the United States 
had grown to its present position of power 



and influence "largely with the aid and 
stimulus which the laws have provided," 
it raised the question of how far freedom 
of association is adequately protected by 
the law in its present form. 

The report states that "the law certainly 
lays down the principle of freedom of asso- 
ciation and establishes machinery for its 
protection," but it notes the contention of 
the unions that it does not fully safeguard 
freedom of association in practice. 

A chapter in the report is devoted to 
labour-management relations and the atti- 
tude of employers toward the trade unions. 
The question is how far attempts by em- 
ployers to restrict union activities are attacks 
on the unions' existence, and how far merely 
part of management's resistance to claims 
for increased wages and benefits. 

Regarding the right of association and 
trade union freedoms, the mission believes 
that the employers do not now object to 
these rights, and it remarks that both the 
Chamber of Commerce and the National 
Association of Manufacturers advocate full 
recognition of the right to organize. 

The report adds that the employers' efforts 
have the twofold aim of containing the 
growth of the power of the unions, and of 
circumscribing the unions' activities in order 
to protect themselves against certain abuses 
they complain of, and against encroachments 
on what they consider their prerogatives. 

A chapter of the report is devoted to the 
question of the extent to which the 
individual member is free to take part in 
the life of his union, to elect his own 
representatives, and to take a share in 
framing the union's policies and aims. It 
examines conditions of membership, union 
democracy and corrupt practices. In general, 
the mission found that limitations by unions 
on the right to join a union were excep- 
tional. 

Regarding union democracy, the facts 
show that the American labour movement 
is a democratic one, the mission says. 
Although instances of proven corruption 
on the part of a number of union officials 
have occurred, the extent of corrupt prac- 
tices in the American labour movement 
appears to be relatively small. 

"The existence of a powerful American 
trade union movement is a fact. Its par- 
ticipation in all phases of American life, 
although not uncriticized, is not in danger," 
the report concludes. The existence of a 
powerful body of trade unionists is itself 
a bulwark protecting the right to organize 
against attacks from any quarter. 



38 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



The Trade Union Situation in the U.S.S.R. 



t 



"While carrying out their functions in 
regard to planning and organizing of pro- 
duction, and while continuing their efforts 
for the protection and welfare of the work- 
ers, the unions remain one of the pillars 
of the Soviet system," says the report of 
the ILO mission to study freedom of associa- 
tion in the Soviet Union. The report has 
just been published. 

The mission, one of the same series as 
that sent to the United States (see facing 
page), was in the Soviet Union from August 
24 until October 23, 1959. The head of the 
mission, John Price, who also headed the 
mission to the United States, visited Russia 
again for two weeks in August 1960. 

The mission met government officials, 
leaders and members of trade unions, direc- 
tors of industrial enterprises, and others; 
visited factories, state and collective farms, 
and numerous trade union social institutions 
— palaces of culture, sanatoria, etc. — and 
attended trade union meetings. 

At the beginning of its report the mission 
says that the structure, functions and rights 
of the Soviet trade unions cannot be pro- 
perly appreciated unless the economic, 
political and social structure of the Soviet 
is taken into account, and "the situation 
of the Soviet trade unions can only be 
clearly understood if the differences between 
the conditions of private capitalism and 
those of the Soviet state are considered." 

The report adds: "The fact that private 
ownership of the means of production has 
been abolished is, in the Soviet view, of 
cardinal importance for an understanding of 
the situation of the Soviet trade unions and 
of the problem of freedom of associa- 
tion . . ." 

Every worker in the Soviet Union is held 
to be participating in a common effort to 
raise the standards of living for everybody. 
His private interests and the sectional 
interests of his industry or locality are 
supposed to be submerged in those of the 
country as a whole. 

In examining the place of the unions in 
the Soviet system today, the mission says: 
"To the Soviet mind, the nature of the 
relations between the Communist Party and 
the trade unions rules out any idea of 
subordination imposed from above. The 
Party exercises its influence on trade unions 
through members of the unions who are also 
members of the Party . . ." 

The report adds that "The performance 
by the unions of major functions of a public 
character is not supposed to affect the 
independence of the union movement vis-a- 



vis the Government or the free exercise of 
their trade union rights. It does, however, 
imply constant co-operation between the 
authorities and the unions at all levels." 

Although the unions are distinct from the 
Government they nevertheless play an im- 
portant part in helping to run the country. 
"There can be no doubt that in accordance 
with their rules the trade unions, like all 
other bodies in the Soviet Union, have to 
follow the leadership of the Party in their 
policies and activities." 

The trade unions in the U.S.S.R. are 
required to exercise not only the traditional 
trade union functions but also functions that 
in other countries are discharged by the 
state, the mission says. "This dual posi- 
tion . . . accounts for the considerable power 
and influence which the Soviet trade unions 
enjoy." 

There are 22 trade unions, with a total 
of about 53,000,000 members in the 
U.S.S.R., which are organized vertically for 
the whole country on the two principles 
that all persons employed in any one fac- 
tory, state farm or other institution belong 
to the same union, and that each union 
comprises the employees of one segment 
of the national economy. The supreme body 
of the trade union movement in Russia 
is the U.S.S.R. Congress of Trade Unions, 
which elects the central body of the trade 
union organization, the All-Union Central 
Council of Trade Unions. 

Union membership is not compulsory, the 
report says, but "membership brings with it 
a number of privileges which act as a 
powerful incentive." 

Regarding collective agreements, the mis- 
sion says that the factory or local committee 
enters into an agreement with the manage- 
ment of the undertaking on behalf of the 
wage earners and salaried employees, includ- 
ing engineers and technical staff. Agreements 
are renewable annually and apply only to 
the undertaking concerned. There are no 
national agreements. 

As to the contents of these agreements, 
the mission says: "The subjects dealt with 
in collective agreements include the obliga- 
tion of the management and the factory 
committee to fulfil production plans, develop 
socialist emulation and extend the use of 
advanced techniques . . . The agreements also 
relate to the conditions and methods of 
wage payment and the fixing of output 
standards, training, labour discipline, labour 
protection and safety techniques, housing 
and welfare, catering arrangements and cul- 
tural facilities." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



39 



The mission did not hear of any instances 
of collective stoppages of work to defend 
the interests of the workers or to obtain 
better working conditions. "The persons 
with whom the mission discussed this matter 
simply stated that strikes were not pro- 



hibited by law in the Soviet Union, and 
that in any case the workers did not have 
to resort to strike action, and there was 
nobody for them to strike against, since 
the means of production belonged to them." 



Study Conference on Labour-Management Relations 



Richard Thrasher, Parliamentary Secre- 
tary to the Minister of Labour, headed the 
Canadian delegation to the study conference, 
sponsored by the International Labour 
Organization, held in Montevideo, Uruguay, 
from November 3 to 12. Andre Potvin, 
Second Secretary and Vice-Consul, Cana- 
dian Embassy, Montevideo, was the other 
government delegate. 

Employer Delegate was Jacques Gagnon, 
Manager, Industrial Relations Division, 
Aluminum Company of Canada, and Worker 
Delegate was Honore Lorrain of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and 
Paper Mill Workers. 

The four main topics on the agenda were: 
the part played by legislation and collective 
bargaining in determining working condi- 
tions and settling labour disputes; dismissal 
and layoff procedures and job security; 
measures that can be taken in establishments 
to promote good relations between manage- 
ment and staff; and contributions of univer- 
sities and research and training institutions 
to the improvement of labour-management 
relations. 




Richard Thrasher 



Seven New African Republics Join ILO 



Between November 4 and December 13, 
seven newly independent African nations 
joined the International Labour Organiza- 
tion, bringing membership to 96. 



The Senegal Republic became the 90th 
member, Congo (Brazzaville) the 91st, 
Chad Republic the 92nd, Somalia the 93rd, 
Ivory Coast the 94th, Upper Volta the 95th, 
and the Republic of Dahomey the 96th. 



Labour Legislation of Past Decade 

(Continued from page S3) 

inspection by the Department of Labour. 
Record-keeping requirements are also to be 
set out in the Ontario regulations. 

It is of interest to note that a 1959 
amendment to the Unemployment Insurance 
Act repealed a provision in that Act author- 
izing the making of regulations for the 
control and licensing of private employment 
agencies, indicating that the matter was 
considered a provincial responsibility. 

In Quebec, besides the employment offices 
run by the Provincial Government (29 of 



which were in operation in 1960), the 
Employment Bureau Act permits the carry- 
ing on of employment agencies, subject to 
certain conditions, by religious and charit- 
able groups, trade unions, and employers 
who have their own employment office. 
These conditions are that an annual permit 
must be obtained from the Minister of 
Labour, a register must be kept, and no 
fee may be collected from any person 
seeking employment. At the end of March 
1960, 222 of these permits were in force. 



40 



THE LABOUn GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



147th Session of Governing Body 



At its 147th Session in mid-November, 
the Governing Body of the International 
Labour Office decided to put technical 
assistance on the agenda for the 1961 Inter- 
national Labour Conference. It also agreed 
to the establishment by the ILO of an 
International Vocational Training Informa- 
tion and Research Centre. 

The request for such a centre had come 
from the Council of Ministers of the Council 
of Europe. Financing of the Centre will be 
assured mainly by the Council.' 

The Centre's function will be to make 
research into vocational training and to 
provide interested organizations with infor- 
mation. 

The information and research work of the 
Centre will be concerned with the various 
groups of personnel requiring vocational 
training, whether basic or supplementary. 
Information will thus be collected on the 
subject of training programs and practices 
relating to, for instance, unskilled, special- 
ized and skilled industrial personnel, office 
staff and supervisors. 

It will also include the training of per- 
sonnel at the corresponding levels for repair 
and maintenance of agricultural equipment, 
and as a second step for other agricultural 
tasks including work in the forestry indus- 
try. Moreover, the Centre will study basic 
as well as continued and further training of 
young persons and adults, undertaken with 
a view to upgrading and promotion. 



Included in the scope of the Centre will 
be all types of training, whether provided 
in undertakings, specialized centres, or in 
other training institutions. The Centre will 
collect and analyse information about 
methods and programs of selection and 
training of personnel and of teachers and 
instructors. 

The Centre will begin its activities from 
the beginning of 1961. Its creation was 
approved by the Governing Body by 33 
votes to 2, with one abstention. 

The Governing Body decided to put on 
the agenda of the 1962 Conference two 
technical questions: (1) Prohibition of the 
sale, hire and use of inadequately guarded 
machinery; and (2) Termination of employ- 
ment (dismissal and laying off). 

Among other matters, the Governing Body 
adopted two reports of its Freedom of 
Association Committee, including its con- 
clusions on allegations of the violation of 
freedom of association in various countries; 
and it fixed the agenda for different meetings, 
such as the next session of the Chemical 
Industries Committee and the Ad Hoc Tri- 
partite Meeting for the Printing and Allied 
Trades. 

It also examined a report on the functions 
of the International Occupational Safety and 
Health Information Centre, which was set 
up just over a year ago. 



First Director of International Institute of Labour Studies 



Sir Douglas Berry Copland of Australia 
has been appointed the first Director of the 
International Labour Office's International 
Institute of Labour Studies, effective May 
1961. The appointment was announced by 
David A. Morse, Director-General of the 
ILO. 

Sir Douglas was Australian High Com- 
missioner to Canada from 1953 to 1956. 

Establishment of the Institute was unan- 
imously approved March 1, 1960 by the 
ILO Governing Body during its 144th 
session (L.G., May 1960, p. 463). 

The Institute aims to provide opportuni- 
ties for study to persons having respon- 
sibility in various spheres of labour and 
social policy, so as to promote a fuller 
understanding and exchange of experience 
on these matters. Public servants, trade 
unionists, industrialists, agricultural leaders. 



leaders of the co-operative movement, 
educators and professional people having 
experience of and responsibility for ques- 
tions of labour policy will be enabled to 
participate in study cycles and round-table 
discussions. The institute will also promote 
new research on matters within its sphere 
of interests. 

Up to November 18 a total of $875,000 
had been contributed to the Endowment 
Fund of the Institute. One donation, $750,- 
000, came from the Federal Republic of 
Germany. The Government of India con- 
tributed $100,000; the Government of 
Tunisia, $5,000. A group of Peruvian 
employers has sent in $10,000, and the 
National Confederation of Industry of Bra- 
zil has offered $10,000 as a first instalment 
toward a larger contribution. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

91211-3—4 



JANUARY 796 J 



41 



TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



The Regina General is the 43rd hospital 
in Canada and the sixth in Saskatchewan to 
set up a labour-management co-operation 
committee. Known as the Regina General 
Hospital Advisory Council, it was estab- 
lished jointly by management and employee 
representatives of Local 176, Regina Hos- 
pital Employees Association (CLC). 

Personnel Officer B. E. Wilford reports 
that considerable interest and enthusiasm 
are being shown both by council members 
and the staff at large. "There are strong 
indications that we can expect a successful 
future for this new venture," he said. 

Alex Cochrane, Business Agent for the 
Employees Association, vouched for the 
level of support the council could expect 
from Local 176: "It is our intention to 
co-operate with management to the fullest 
extent," he declared. 

* * * 

According to union and management 
spokesmen at Hinde and Dauch, Limited, 
Winnipeg, the Safety Team Contest intro- 
duced last year has created considerable 
interest and friendly rivalry among all em- 
ployees, including management, production 
and office staffs. 

Safety Co-ordinator Lance Paulley stated 
that though no one knows what team he 
is on, each employee has the privilege of 
checking up any person, including senior 
management personnel, whom he notices 
committing an unsafe act. The "informer" 
actually receives additional credits for 
"turning in" the culprit, by reporting what 
he saw to the safety co-ordinator. Players 
are fined so many points for injuries, unsafe 
acts and lost-time accidents. Should an em- 
ployee fail to report his injury to a super- 
visor or the safety co-ordinator, the penalty 
charged against him is doubled. 

Contest periods run for six months, at 
the end of which time cash awards are pre- 
sented to each member of the team with 
the lowest number of points against it. 

* * * 

Only through a well-organized system of 
joint consultation and regular labour-man- 
agement committee meetings can the full 
value of employer-employee co-operation be 
realized, claims Harry Livingstone, Manager 
of Personnel Administration for L. E. Shaw 
Ltd., Halifax. 



"Unless such things are organized," he 
said, "there is not the same need or pressure 
to sit down and take advantage of them." 

Co-operation between the company and 
its employees, members of the National 
Union of Brickyard Workers, was first intro- 
duced to L. E. Shaw Ltd. in 1949 when 
a labour-management production committee 
was set up at the firm's main plant in Lantz, 
N.S. Joint consultation is currently being 
practised by three of the company's eight 
plants and is soon to be extended. 

* * * 

Transit Division of the Nova Scotia Light 
and Power Company in Halifax will be 
holding an Open House for employees and 
their families every two years from now 
on, says Superintendent L. Currie Young. 
More than 200 adults and children attended 
this year's event, the first of its kind ever 
staged by Transit. Promoters of the idea 
were the members of the division's labour- 
management committee. 

Remarked Mr. Young: "Open House was 
a bigger success than we expected. It was 
the first opportunity the wives and children 
have had to see the husbands' and fathers' 
place of work. They were extremely inter- 
ested in what goes on here." 

Representatives of the Amalgamated As- 
sociation of Street, Electric Railway and 
Motor Coach Employees of America are 
among the members serving on the labour- 
management committee. 

* * * 

Speaking to a recent luncheon meeting 
of the Kiwanis Club in Winnipeg, Russ H. 
Robbins, business agent of Local 343, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners (AFL-CIO/CLC), declared that 
there was a great need today for an im- 
provement in labour-management relations. 

Among the proposals he put forward to 
achieve this was the suggestion that "con- 
sultation and discussion with shop stewards 
in your plant regarding your problems, as 
well as those problems and grievances 
brought up to the workmen's representatives, 
should help to establish a feeling of being 
part of an enterprise, and might lead to 
establishment of a labour-management pro- 
duction committee." 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Committees is encouraged and assisted by 
the Labour-Management Co-operation Serv- 
ice, Industrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field representa- 
tives located in key industrial centres, who 
are available to help both managements and 
trade unions, the Service provides various 
aids in the form of booklets, posters and 
films. 



42 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 796 J 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board met 
for two days during November. The Board 
issued three certificates designating bargain- 
ing agents, ordered one representation vote, 
and rejected two applications for certifica- 
tion. During the month the Board received 
15 applications for certification and allowed 
the withdrawal of one application for cer- 
tification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, on behalf 
of a unit of warehouse employees and 
drivers employed by Tippet-Richardson 
(Ottawa) Limited, Ottawa (L.G., Nov. 
1960, p. 1140). 

2. International Longshoremen's and 
Warehousemen's Union, Local 512, Cana- 
dian Area, on behalf of a unit of employees 
of Vancouver Wharves Limited, employed 
at the company's operation at North Van- 
couver, B.C., in the handling and ware- 
housing of cargo and in the maintenance of 
plant equipment (L.G., Nov. 1960, p. 1140). 

3. Maritime Airline Pilots Association, on 
behalf of a unit of stewardesses, despatch- 
ers, ticket agents, and general duty em- 
ployees (cooks), employed by the Maritime 
Central Airways Limited, Charlottetown, 
P.E.L (L.G., Dec. 1960, p. 1294). 

Representation Vote Ordered 

General Truck Drivers' Union, Local 
879 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, applicant, and Leslie 
Armstrong Mail Service, Owen Sound, Ont., 
respondent (L.G., Nov. 1960, p. 1140) 
(Returning Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 

Applications for Certification Rejected 

1. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, applicant, 
Kingcome Navigation Company Limited, 



Vancouver, respondent, and Seafarers' In- 
ternational Union of North America, Cana- 
dian District, intervener (L.G., Dec. 1960, 
p. 1293). The application was rejected 
because it was not supported by a majority 
of the employees eligible to cast ballots in 
a representation vote conducted by the 
Board. 

2. Ready-Mix, Building Supply, Hydro 
and Construction Drivers, Warehousemen 
and Helpers, Local Union No. 230 of the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, applicant, Ottawa Pre-Mixed Con- 
crete Limited, Ottawa, respondent, and 
Canadian Construction Workers' Union, 
Division No. 1, NCCL, intervener (L.G., 
Dec. 1960, p. 1294). The application was 
rejected because, in the opinion of the 
Board, the business operated by the com- 
pany does not fall within the provisions of 
Section 53 of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act and therefore 
does not come within the jurisdiction of 
the Board. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of unlicensed personnel 
employed aboard tugboats operated by 
Foundation Maritime Limited, Halifax, N.S. 
(Investigating Officer: D. T. Cochrane). 

2. Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc., 
on behalf of a unit of deck officers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by the 
National Sand & Material Company Limited, 
Toronto, Ont. (Investigating Officer: R. L. 
Fournier) (see item 12, below). 

3. International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers of America, Local 419, on behalf of 
a unit of mail pick-up and delivery drivers 
employed by John A. Snow, Willowdale, 
Ont. (Investigating Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

91211-3— 4i 



JANUARY 1967 



43 



4. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of marine engineers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by Upper 
Lakes Shipping Limited, Toronto, Ont. 
(Investigating Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

5. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of marine engineers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by Scott 
Misener Steamships Ltd., Port Colborne, 
Ont. (Investigating Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

6. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of marine engineers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by N. M. 
Paterson & Sons Limited, Montreal, Que. 
(Investigating Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

7. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of marine engineers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by Hall 
Corporation of Canada, Montreal, Que. 
(Investigating Officer: C. E. Poirier). 



8. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of marine engineers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by the 
Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation Ltd. 
(Dominion Shipping Division), Montreal, 
Que. (Investigating Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

9. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of marine engineers em- 
ployed aboard vessels operated by La 
Verendrye Line, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
(Investigating Officer: R. L. Fournier). 

10. Civil Service Association of Canada, 
Ottawa-Hull Local Council, on behalf of 
a unit of heating and power plant employees 
employed by the Central Mortgage and 
Housing Corporation at its head office, the 
Laurentian Terrace, and the Strathcona 
Heights Development, all located in Ottawa, 
Ont. (Investigating Officer: B. H. Hardie). 

11. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on behalf 
of a unit of marine engineers employed 



Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 



Conciliation services under the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
provided by the Minister of Labour through 
the Industrial Relations Branch. The Branch 
also acts as the administrative arm of the 
Canada Labour Relations Board, in matters 
under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act came into force on Sep- 
tember 1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, 
v/hich became effective in March, 1944, and 
repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, which had been in force from 1907 
until superseded by the Wartime Regulations 
in 1944. Decisions, orders and certificates 
given under the Wartime Regulations by the 
Minister of Labour and the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board are continued in force and 
effect by the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within 
federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, 
interprovincial and international steamship 
lines and ferries, aerodromes and air trans- 
portation, radio broadcasting stations and 
work declared by Parliament to be for the 
general advantage of Canada or two or 
more of its provinces. Additionally, the Act 
provides that provincial authorities, if they 
so desire, may enact similar legislation for 
application to industries within provincial 
jurisdiction and make mutually satisfactory 
arrangements with the federal Government 
for the administration of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with 
the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of con- 
ciliation officers, conciliation boards, and 
Industrial Inquiry Commissions concerning 
complaints that the Act has been violated 
or that a party has failed to bargain collec- 
tively, and for application for consent to 
prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is 
established under the Act as successor to 



the Wartime Labour Relations Board to 
administer provisions concerning the certi- 
fication of bargaining agents, the writing of 
provisions — for incorporation into collective 
agreements — fixing a procedure for the final 
settlement of disputes concerning the mean- 
ing or violation of such agreements and the 
investigation of complaints referred to it by 
the minister that a party has failed to 
bargain collectively and to make every 
reasonable effort to conclude a collective 
agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of 
Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations 
Board are available upon request to the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported below under two headings: (1) 
Certification and other Proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board, and 
(2) Conciliation and other Proceedings 
before the Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the De- 
partment of Labour are stationed at Vancou- 
ver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, New- 
foundland. The territory of four officers 
resident in Vancouver comprises British 
Columbia, Alberta, and the Yukon and 
Northwest Territories; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the province of Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba and Northwestern 
Ontario; four officers resident in Toronto 
confine their activities to Ontario; five 
officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three 
officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and 
St. John's represent the Department in the 
Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of Industrial Rela- 
tions and staff are situated in Ottawa. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 196? 



aboard vessels based in Canada and oper- 
ated by The Commercial Cable Company, 
New York, N.Y. (Investigating Officer: 
R. L. Fournier). 

12. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on 
behalf of a unit of deck officers employed 
aboard vessels operated by the National 
Sand & Material Company Limited, Toronto, 
Ont. (Investigating Officer: Remi Duquette) 
{see item 2, above). 

13. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on behalf 
of a unit of marine officers employed aboard 
vessels operated by the National Sand & 
Material Company Limited, Toronto, Ont. 
(Investigating Officer: Remi Duquette). 

14. International Union of Electrical 
Workers, Local 424, on behalf of a unit of 
employees employed by the Northland 



Utilities Ltd. and its wholly-owned subsi- 
diaries, Northland Utilities (B.C.) Ltd. and 
Uranium City Power Co. Limited, Edmon- 
ton, Alta. (Investigating Officer: J. S. 
Gunn.) 

15. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on behalf 
of a unit of marine engineers employed 
aboard vessels operated by The Algoma 
Central and Hudson Bay Railway Company, 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. (Investigating Officer: 
Remi Duquette). 

Application for Certification Withdrawn 

Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Trans- 
port and General Workers, applicant, Cana- 
dian National Railways, respondent, and 
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Em- 
ployees, intervener (hump yard, Moncton, 
N.B.) (L.G., Dec. 1960, p. 1294). 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officer Appointed 

During November, the Minister of Labour 
appointed a conciliation officer to deal with 
the following dispute: 

Pacific Tanker Company Limited, Van- 
couver, and Seafarers' International Union 
of North America, Canadian District (Con- 
ciliation Officer: G. R. Currie). 

Settlement Reported by Conciliation Officers 

1. Barnhill's Transfer Limited, Truro, 
N.S., and Locals 76 and 927 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America (Conciliation Officer: D. T. Coch- 
rane) (L.G., Dec. 1960, p. 1295). 

2. Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Co. 
Limited (Radio Station CKCR) Kitchener, 
Ont., and National Association of Broadcast 
Employees and Technicians (Conciliation 
Officer: T. B. McRae) (L.G., Dec. 1960, 
p. 1295). 

3. Denison Mines Limited, Elliot Lake, 
Ont., and United Steelworkers of America, 
Local 5185 (office and technical employees) 
(Conciliation Officer: F. J. Ainsborough) 
(L.G., Nov. 1960, p. 1140). 

4. Northern Wings Limited, Sept lies, 
Que., and International Association of 
Machinists (Conciliation Officer: Remi Du- 
quette) (L.G., Sept. 1960, p. 923). 

5. Island Fertilizers Inc., Charlottetown, 
P.E.L, and Labourers Protective Union No. 
9568 (Conciliation Officer: H. R. Petti- 
grove) (L.G., Sept. 1960, p. 923). 



Conciliation Boards Appointed 

1. The Hamilton Harbour Commissioners, 
Hamilton, Ont., and the International Long- 
shoremen's Association (L.G., Dec. 1960, 
p. 1295). 

2. Trans-Canada Air Lines, Montreal, 
Que., and Canadian Air Line Flight Attend- 
ants' Association (L.G., Nov. 1960, p. 
1140). 

Conciliation Board Fully Constituted 

The Board of Conciliation and Investiga- 
tion established in September to deal with 
a dispute between Radio Station CHVC, 
Niagara Falls, Ont., and National Associa- 
tion of Broadcast Employees and Tech- 
nicians (L.G., Nov. 1960, p. 1142) was fully 
constituted in October with the appoint- 
ment of R. G. Geddes, Toronto, as Chair- 
man. Mr. Geddes was appointed by the 
Minister on the joint recommendation of 
the other two members, R. V. Hicks, Q.C., 
and Miller Stewart, both of Toronto, who 
were previously appointed on the nomina- 
tion of the company and union, respectively. 

Board Report Received during Month 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, SS 
Princess Helene, and Seafarers' International 
Union, Canadian District (L.G., Dec. 1960, 
p. 1295). The text of the report is repro- 
duced below. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



45 



Settlements Readied atter Board Procedure 

1. McAllister Towing Ltd. (Sincennes- 
McNaughton Division) Montreal, and Sea- 
farers' International Union of North Amer- 
ica, Canadian District (L.G., Nov. 1960, 
p. 1142). 

2. National Harbours Board (Fleet De- 
partment, Montreal Harbour) and Seafar- 
ers' International Union of North America, 
Canadian District (L.G., Nov. 1960, p. 
1150). 



Settlement after Strike after Board Procedure 

United Grain Growers Ltd., Pacific Ele- 
vators Limited, Alberta Wheat Pool, Saskat- 
chewan Wheat Pool and Burrard Terminals 
Limited, Vancouver, and Grain Workers 
Union, Local 333 of the International Union 
of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft 
Drink and Distillery Workers of America 
(L.G., Aug. 1960, p. 815). Stoppage of 
work occurred 12 a.m. November 8, agree- 
ment was signed November 29, and the 
employees returned to work on that date. 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, SS Princess Helene 

and 

Seafarers' International Union of North America, Canadian District 



Sittings of the Board were held in the 
Admiral Beatty Hotel in the City of Saint 
John, N.B., October 25 to 28 inclusive, and 
again on November 1 to 3 inclusive. All 
members of the Board were present at all 
meetings and at the first sittings all of the 
members representing both parties were also 
present. 

The first sittings were taken up in hearing 
a general submission on all the points at 
issue from the Union, the reading by the 
Union of a brief in support of its sub- 
mission; the reply by the Company to such 
submissions and a reading by the Com- 
pany of a brief setting forth its own sub- 
missions. 

The Union proposals, six in all, are as 
follows: 

1. A wage increase of 30 per cent. 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with the dispute between the Sea- 
farers' International Union of North Amer- 
ica, Canadian District, and Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company, SS Princess Helene. 

The Board was under the chairmanship 
of His Honour Judge K. L. Crowell, of 
Bridgetown, N.S. He was appointed by the 
Minister on the joint recommendation of 
the other two members, E. Neil McKelvey, 
QC, Saint John, N.B., and Gerald N. Keddy, 
Halifax, N.S., nominees of the company 
and union, respectively. 

The majority report, which under the pro- 
visions of the Industrial Relations and Dis- 
putes Investigation Act constitutes the report 
of the Board, was submitted by the Chair- 
man and Mr. McKelvey. The minority report 
was submitted by Mr. Keddy. 

The majority and minority reports are 
reproduced here. 



2. Overtime to be paid for at time and 
one-half, and double time. 

3. Overtime to be paid for in one hour 
and half-hour periods. 

4. Reduction in daily work spread to 
eight hours per day within a spread of ten 
hours. 

5. Annual leave to be increased in accord- 
ance with service. 

6. Revisions and additions to the current 
agreements. 

The Company proposals are as follows: 

1. Elimination of room and board. 

2. Ten-cent payroll deduction of union 
dues to cover costs of administration. 

3. Overtime to be paid on minute basis. 

4. Employees to be hired direct without 
reference to hiring hall. 

5. Deletion of a clause requiring em- 
ployees be discharged for non-payment of 
arrears in union dues. 

Union Proposals 

1. A wage increase of 30 per cent 

In support of the above proposal, the 
Union referred to collective agreements it 
had with other steamship operators in 
Canada; these in the main were tankers, 
bulk freighters and general freight and cargo 
services operating on the Great Lakes, 
coastal and deep sea trades where the 
monthly rates of pay are considerably higher 
than those paid on the Princess Helene. The 
Union also referred to the west coast Com- 
pany ships where the rates of pay were 
the same as for the east coast ship, the 
Princess Helene, for the years 1950-1953 
inclusive, but where in the years 1959 and 



46 



THf LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



1960 the west coast rates advanced con- 
siderably over the east coast rates. The 
Company on the other hand took the 
position that it could not recognize the 
above steamship operations as being com- 
parable with the type of service supplied by 
the Princess Helene, which for the most part 
is a ferry service similar to the service sup- 
plied by the MV Bluenose, the William 
Carson and the Abegweit, all serving on the 
east coast, and where the monthly rates 
are for the most part in line with those 
paid on the Princess Helene. The Company 
further submits that the proper comparison 
of wage rates is with the general level of 
wages paid to similar services in the same 
area, consequently, there should be no com- 
parison between wages paid on the west 
coast and those paid on the east coast. The 
Company further submits that this service 
is not self-supporting and that the total 
deficit sustained by this service over the 
past ten years is $565,083, an average 
deficit of some $56,000 in round figures 
and if the proposals of the Union were to 
be implemented in full, this annual deficit 
would be increased by an amount of some 
$99,000. The wage increase of 30 per cent 
alone would add some $48,400 to the annual 
average deficit. For these reasons, the Com- 
pany states that it is in no position to 
increase wages at this time. 

2. and 3. Overtime at time and one-half 
and to be paid in one hour and 
half-hour periods. 

At the present time the overtime rate 
is $1.45.2 per hour and is paid in fifteen 
minute increments. The Union requests that 
this be changed to time and one-half and 
payment to be made in hour and half-hour 
increments. This increase in overtime ex- 
pense the Company submits would add 
$6,700 to the annual average deficit. 

As things now stand the men almost 
always work on statutory holidays which 
do not fall on their rest days. Under the 
present agreements a man who works on 
a statutory holiday receives pay for the 
time worked at the overtime rate above. 
When a statutory holiday falls on a man's 
rest day, he also receives eight hours addi- 
tional pay at the overtime rate. The Union 
requests that double time be paid for work 
actually performed on statutory holidays 
and rest days and a day's pay at time and 
one-half in lieu of a holiday when it falls 
on a man's rest day. 

The company indicated a willingness to 
agree to pay time and one-half for daily 
overtime actually worked and for time 
actually worked on statutory holidays. 



4. Reduction in daily work spread to eight 
hours per day within a spread of 10 
hours instead of 8 hours within a spread 
of 12 hours. 

The Union is basing its claim for this 
change in the agreement because the men 
have no regular work watches and can be 
put to work and knocked off for an hour, 
and so on, for twelve hours per day. The 
Company submits that this is impractical 
since the return trip of the Princess Helene 
takes usually ten hours and the men have 
to be on duty a short time before sailing 
from and after returning to Saint John. The 
cost of this proposed change would, accord- 
ing to the company, cost $39,700 in addi- 
tional pay. 

5. Increased vacations 

The Union's request here is, in effect, 
three weeks' vacation with pay after five 
years' service, four weeks after fifteen years 
and five weeks after twenty-five years. Here 
again the Company estimates that the im- 
plementation of this request would cost an 
additional $3,300. Under the present agree- 
ment they receive two weeks after one 
year and up to fifteen years and three weeks 
after fifteen years' service. 

6. Revisions and deletions 

These appear to be minor matters, all of 
which might very well be settled by nego- 
tiations with the parties, however at the 
request of the Union we shall deal with 
each separately later on in this report. 

Company Proposals 

1. Elimination of room and board 

At the present time three meals a day 
are provided for all crew members and 
sleeping accommodation is made available 
for those who are off duty. The Company 
submits that this is a burdensome and 
unnecessary expense in the operation of 
the Princess Helene as most of the crew 
members live in Saint John where it docks 
every evening, so that the crew members 
can and do go home; sleeping accommoda- 
tion is, therefore, not necessary and the 
only meal that must be taken away from 
Saint John is the mid-day meal. The Com- 
pany is willing to negotiate with the Union 
for a quid pro quo for the elimination of 
this service. The Union is of the opinion 
that the Canada Shipping Act requires the 
Company to provide these services; further, 
it is apparently unwilling to negotiate for 
a quid pro quo for the taking away of these 
services. 

The Company on the other hand is 
firmly convinced that the aforesaid Act 
contains no such requirement. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



47 



2. Ten-cent payroll deduction 

The Company submits that the Union 
should pay for the services of having Union 
dues deducted at the payroll source and 
remitted to the Union and that ten cents 
per deduction is a very reasonable charge. 
The Union, however, having never paid for 
this service, does not think that it should 
assume any part of this charge. 

3. Overtime on a minute basis 

The Company contends that in most 
instances overtime is paid in shipping circles 
on the minute basis and further, that the 
present manner of calculating overtime is 
an added financial burden to the Company. 
(Refer back to the Union proposal on over- 
time.) 

4. Employees to be hired direct 

At the present time new employees are 
obtained through the SIU hiring hall. The 
Company submits that this method of ob- 
taining new employees has not proven satis- 
factory and although it has the right to 
reject unsatisfactory employees offered by 
the Union, there is a responsibility on man- 
agement to demonstrate that certain can- 
didates are unacceptable. This usually means 
employing unsatisfactory personnel until 
such time as their deficiencies become 
apparent, a procedure which is costly to 
the Company. The Company further con- 
tends that the ship's officers, with their 
long experience of employing crew members, 
can do so more efficiently and with less 
expense than can the Union. The Union, 
on the other hand, is reluctant to make any 
change; it is afraid that men other than 
seamen may be hired from time to time; 
in that way some seamen may be replaced 
by non-seamen. 

During the course of the hearings the 
Board attempted to determine whether there 
was any common ground between the parties 
on any of the matters in dispute and, for 
that purpose, held private meetings with 
the Company and with the Union. The 
Board could not find any major points on 
which there appeared to be any possibility 
of the parties reaching common ground at 
that time and are therefor in the position 
of having to make a report on the basis on 
which, in the Board's opinion, the terms in 
dispute should be settled. 

The following are my recommendations 
as chairman: 

Union Proposal No. 1 — Wage increase of 
30 per cent 

Since 1952 all wage settlements between 
the Company and the Union respecting 
unlicensed personnel on the Princess Helene 



have followed the settlement made by the 
Company on its railway operations with the 
various unions representing its non-operating 
employees. The unlicensed personnel on the 
Princess Helene come in daily contact with 
freight handlers at Saint John and Digby 
engaged in loading and unloading the vessel. 
These freight handlers are included in the 
non-operating railway trades and their scale 
of wages is comparable to the wages of 
personnel on the vessel performing com- 
parable duties. The Company has estab- 
lished that the Princess Helene is operating 
in a deficit position and therefore claims 
inability to make any increase in wages. The 
Union representative admitted the Com- 
pany had made a strong case of inability 
to pay. The Company is presently in dispute 
with its non-operating personnel and claims 
that if they receive any increase in wages 
it must come from an increase in freight 
rates approved by the Board of Transport 
Commissioners or by a subsidy from the 
federal Government. If the Company can 
obtain sufficient revenue from these or other 
sources to enable settlement to be made 
with its non-operating personnel, number- 
ing about 120,000, it should be able to 
extend the same wage increase to the 
unlicensed personnel of the Princess Helene 
who number a maximum of 75 during the 
busy months. 

Some comment should be made on the 
matter of comparative wages. The Union 
claims the proper comparison should be 
made with the wages paid by lake shipping 
companies and in other cost deep sea ves- 
sels and also those paid in the CPR west 
coast service. The Company claims the 
proper comparison is with other east coast 
ferries. 

The fairest wage comparison appears to 
be that made by the Company. 

The east coast ferries carry on services 
similar to those performed by the Princess 
Helene; the Abegweit running between New 
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, The 
Northumberland Ferries running between 
Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, the 
Bluenose running between Yarmouth and 
Bar Harbour, Me., and the William Carson 
running between Nova Scotia and New- 
foundland. Working conditions on these 
vessels are far different from those on lake 
and deep sea vessels. On the latter, seamen 
are required to be at sea for long periods 
of time and have infrequent opportunity to 
live at home; they spend most of their time 
on board ship. A seaman on a ferry, how- 
ever, is able to live at home most of the 
time; in the case of the Princess Helene 
most of the employees live in Saint John 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



and are home every night. For those rea- 
sons the comparison proposed by the Union 
is not appropriate. 

There is no justification for a comparison 
between the wages paid on the Princess 
Helene and those paid on the CPR west 
coast service. Prior to 1958 the wages paid 
on the Princess Helene were roughly com- 
parable to the wages paid by the CPR on 
the west coast. We were told that the 
Union, while negotiating on the west coast 
in 1957 and 1958, claimed its wages there 
should not be tied to east coast wages 
because wage levels were generally higher 
in Vancouver than in Saint John. The 
Union's arguments prevailed on the west 
coast and, since 1959 wages paid on the 
west coast service have been higher than 
those paid on the Princess Helene. The 
Company filed a list of comparable rates in 
other industries showing that hourly wages 
in Vancouver are about $1 higher than in 
Saint John. A wide wage disparity between 
different areas of the country is an economic 
fact in Canada. This is dictated by economic 
reasons beyond the control of any one 
company or any one union. A proposal for 
country-wide equality of wages is a failure 
to face the economic facts of life, except, 
apparently, in the case of railway operating 
and non-operating trades where the con- 
tinuity of the undertaking has forced an 
acceptance of some degree of country-^wide 
parity. Until the Maritime Provinces develop 
to the degree of economic development in 
British Columbia neither labour, manage- 
ment, white collar workers, small business 
men nor professional men can expect their 
remuneration to be as high as that enjoyed 
in British Columbia. We all hope, of course, 
that economic development will erase the 
differential but until it does claims for 
equality are impossible to achieve. 

In my view a further comparison to be 
made is to compare the Princess Helene 
wages with those of the CPR non-operating 
employees exercising similar skills. In view 
of the nature of the Princess Helene's oper- 
ations, hours of work and working condi- 
tions on the vessel are different from those 
of freight handlers who work in the dock 
sheds or other shore based non-operating 
personnel. The Company has submitted the 
following wage comparisons with non-oper- 
ating personnel. 

All Personnel — Skilled and Unskilled 
(per hour) 

Princess Helene 

average $1,549 in August 

1.605 in February 
Non-operating 

average 1.77 



Unskilled Personnel (per hour) 
Princess Helene 

average $1,395 

Non-operating 

average 1.662 

When the value of meals and sleeping 
accommodation and other benefits are con- 
sidered, the wages paid on the Princess 
Helene are roughly comparable with the 
wages paid to non-operating employees 
exercising similar skills. 

It is therefor my recommendation that 
the present dispute be settled on the same 
basis as the eventual settlement reached 
with the non-operating trades. 

Union Proposal No.'s 2 and 3 — Overtime 
to be paid for at time and one-half with 
double time for work on assigned days off 

Company Proposal No. 3 — Overtime to be 

computed on minute basis 

These proposals fall into three main 
categories as follows: 

(a) daily overtime in excess of eight 
hours in twelve; 

(b) pay for time worked on statutory 
holidays and on rest days; 

(c) pay for statutory holidays which fall 
on rest days and are not worked. 

As to (a): The Union has claimed that 
payment of time and one-half is normal 
overtime remuneration. Under the present 
agreement overtime is determined in incre- 
ments of fifteen minutes so that a man who 
works one minute overtime is paid for fif- 
teen minutes, a man who works sixteen 
minutes is paid for thirty minutes and so on. 
The Company appeared willing to accept 
the proposal that overtime be paid at time 
and one-half provided that it is paid only 
for the time actually worked. The Union 
requests that an hour's overtime be paid 
for any overtime up to sixty minutes and 
that overtime after the first hour be com- 
puted in increments of thirty minutes. I 
think there is merit in the Company's pro- 
position that overtime should be paid on 
the basis only of time worked. 

The requirement that a company pay for 
time not actually worked is a rather unusual 
one and a claim that such a requirement 
be deleted is obviously valid. The difficulty 
in the present case, however, is that a 
provision requiring pay for time not worked 
is already in the contract and complete 
acceptance of the Company's request would 
involve taking something away from the 
men — in cases of short overtime, probably 
resulting in a decrease of pay for some 
men. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 196 1 



49 



I recommend that overtime in excess of 
eight hours per day in a spread of twelve 
be paid for at the rate of time and one-half 
and that, as a compromise, fifteen minutes 
overtime be paid for any overtime within 
the first fifteen minutes, and on a minute 
basis thereafter. 

As to (b): Under the present contract 
where a statutory holiday falls on a man's 
regular work day, he is paid at the rate of 
$1.45.2 per hour for that day in addition 
to his regular monthly wages. Because of 
the continuous nature of the service men 
are usually required to work on statutory 
holidays which do not fall on their regular 
rest days. I recommend the continuation of 
the present practice except that the addi- 
tional pay for time actually worked on 
statutory holidays be computed at the rate 
of time and one-half the actual hourly rate. 
I further recommend that when a man 
works on a holiday which is his assigned 
rest day, he receive time and one-half for 
time actually worked over and above what 
he would receive had he not worked. 

As to (c): Under the present contract, 
if a statutory holiday falls on a man's rest 
day, which apparently happens infrequently, 
he receives, in addition to his monthly 
wages, $1.45.2 per hour for eight hours 
for the holiday. Although this appears 
unusual it was not requested by the Com- 
pany that it be deleted. I recommend that 
this provision remain as it is in the present 
contract. 

The Union claimed that the hourly rate 
for purposes of computing overtime should 
be the monthly salary divided by 169.3, 
which is arrived at by deducting two rest 
days per week and statutory holidays from 
the number of days in the year and multiply- 
ing by eight hours per day and dividing by 
twelve. The Company claims that the figure 
used should be 174 which is arrived at by 
the same computations except that the 
initial deduction is only for two rest days a 
week and no statutory holidays. The men 
normally work on statutory holidays (except 
when they fall on rest days) and in deter- 
mining the normal hourly rate all days 
normally worked should be considered, and 
abnormal conditions caused by extra pay 
on statutory holidays must be disregarded. 
Thus the Company is correct in deducting 
the rest days only. I therefor recommend 
that the figure of 174 be used for comput- 
ing the hourly rate rather than 169.3. 

Union Proposal No. 4 — Reduction in daily 

work spread to ten hours 

Under the present agreement the regular 
eight hours per day must be worked within 
a period of twelve hours and the Union 



requests this period be reduced to ten. I 
am satisfied that ten hours is not sufficient 
time to allow for the vessel to complete 
its day's run having in mind that personnel 
are required to report some time before 
the vessel sails and may take some time 
after the vessel finally docks for the day 
before they can be knocked off. Therefore, 
it is not possible for the Company to 
schedule the eight hours of regular work 
within a spread of ten hours. This request 
is, in reality, a monetary demand only. 
I therefor recommend that the twelve hour 
spread, as at present, be continued. 

Union Proposal No. 5 — Increase in annual 

leave 

The Union's request for three weeks' 
vacation after five years, four weeks after 
fifteen years and five weeks after twenty- 
five years is not justified under any com- 
parison with working conditions elsewhere. 
I think, however, that a man who has put 
in twenty^ve years service on the Princess 
Helene should have more than three weeks' 
annual leave. Personnel on the Princess 
Helene are regularly away from their homes 
for a longer period than employees in other 
industries, normally not returning home 
until 8 or 8:30 p.m., and some being away 
from their homes five nights per week. This 
applies five days in every week. It seems 
reasonable that personnel so employed 
should receive some extra recognition on 
account of long service. I therefor recom- 
mend that the present agreement be con- 
tinued (two weeks after one year and three 
weeks after fifteen years) except that a 
provision should be added for four weeks' 
vacation after twenty-five years. 

Company Proposal No. 1 — Elimination of 

room and meals 

Under the present agreement the Com- 
pany is obliged to supply three meals per 
day and sleeping accommodation for all 
personnel on the Princess Helene. We were 
advised that the men receive a full break- 
fast, a full course meal at dinner time and 
a full course meal at supper time. The 
Company wishes to be free to achieve 
economies in the operation of the vessel 
by cutting down or even eliminating the 
meal services on the vessel and by freeing 
itself from the obligation to provide over- 
night sleeping accommodation for the crew. 
We were advised that the management has 
not yet made a decision on what reduction 
is to be made in the providing of passengers' 
meals and it is therefor not in a position 
to determine the actual amount it can save 
per month. They have, however, indicated 
a willingness to provide a quid pro quo or 
some compensation to the employees for 



50 



THE LABOUR GAZBTTE • JANUARY 196? 



the taking away of meals and sleeping 
accommodations. Because the decision on 
what reduction is to be made in kitchen 
facilities, the Company cannot suggest what 
amount or form the quid pro quo is to take. 
The Union is unwilling to accept in prin- 
ciple the proposal that meals and sleeping 
accommodation be discontinued and con- 
sequently is unwilling to negotiate on the 
form and amount of a quid pro quo. 

It is my opinion that the Company has 
made out a good case to substantiate its 
request that it should be free to discontinue 
providing meals and sleeping accommoda- 
tion upon providing the men with a quid 
pro quo, and I recommend that the Com- 
pany should be free to do so, provided the 
parties agree on the providing by the Com- 
pany of compensation in form and amount 
satisfactory to the Union. This should not, 
however, delay the immediate signing of 
an agreement containing the same clauses 
in this respect as at present. If agreement 
is reached on other points, I recommend 
the parties sign a contract retaining the 
present clauses in this respect and that 
negotiations continue for the purpose of 
obtaining agreement on a satisfactory quid 
pro quo. 

If meals and sleeping accommodation are 
eliminated, the Company is willing to pro- 
vide the men with day time accommodation 
for their convenience while off duty, and 
offered meals and sleeping accommodation 
in emergencies either on board or ashore 
when the vessel is required to lay over in 
Digby because of operating conditions. I 
recommend that satisfactory day time 
accommodation be provided including day 
couches where off duty personnel may lay 
down. The offer to provide these services 
in emergencies is, of course, necessary. 

Company Proposal No. 2 — Ten-cent charge 
for each deduction of union dues 
On this point there are insufficient data 

before the Board to make an intelligent 

recommendation. Therefore it makes no 

further comment on this matter. 

Company Proposal No. 4 — Deletion of the 
requirement that all employees must be 
supplied by the union. 
The present agreement provides that the 
Company will request the Union to supply 
men to fill all vacancies; the Union agrees 
to supply capable, competent and satisfac- 
tory men; and the officer in charge of the 
vessel may refuse the Union's replacement 
provided it is for valid reasons which rejec- 
tion may be taken up as a grievance by 
the Union if it is not satisfied with the 
reasons. The Union states this is a matter 
of major policy with the SIU, that it has 



it in all its agreements, that it is an essential 
part of their method of organization and 
refused to consider deleting it. The Company 
claims that this has produced difficulties, 
that the Union has sometimes supplied unfit 
personnel and that it wishes to have the 
hiring of men made the responsibility of 
one of its officers who can answer to 
management if the man proves unfit; and 
that the right of the Union to institute a 
grievance procedure on the question of the 
competence of a replacement is burdensome. 
Since this question is a matter of major 
policy with the Union I do not recommend 
deleting this clause. I feel, however, there 
is merit in the company's claim that it 
should have the right to interview and 
investigate applicants for employment on 
the Princess Helene in a manner no more 
stringent than required for applicants in 
other departments. There appears to be 
reason to believe that the present clause 
permits the Company to do so but the 
parties do not seem to be in agreement 
whether it does or not. I recommend that, 
if the parties do not agree that the clause 
gives the Company such rights, appropriate 
words be added to do so. I feel that adding 
such a provision will preserve the Union's 
policy of requiring companies with whom 
it has agreements to obtain personnel 
through the union office, and will also give 
the Company the protection it requests 
against the possibility of the Union supply- 
ing men who are not considered by the 
officers in charge of the vessel to have the 
necessary qualifications for the job. 

Company Proposal No. 5 — Deletion of 
clause requiring the Company to dis- 
charge employees refusing to pay arrears 
of union dues. 

Clause 4 of the present contract dealing 
with union security requires unlicensed per- 
sonnel "as a condition of employment" 
either to join the Union and continue as 
members thereof during their employment, 
or, in the alternative, to pay union dues 
and initiation fees and states 

"and failure to pay arrears of monthly 
dues at pay-off shall be a bar to further 
employment until such arrears are 
paid." 

The Company agrees to deduct union initia- 
tion fees and dues upon receipt of author- 
ization forms signed by employees. 

The Company has requested that the 
words quoted above be deleted on the 
ground that the voluntary check-off is 
sufficient protection to the Union in respect 
to collecting dues and that it should not 
be required to penalize its operation by 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



51 



holding experienced workers out of service 
to police the relationship between the Union 
and its members. 

Deletion of the requested words will, in 
my view, have no effect whatever in view 
of the fact that the preceding part of the 
clause states that maintenance of member- 
ship in the Union or payment of union dues 
is "a condition of employment". Since the 
deletion of the words requested accomplishes 
nothing. I recommend against this request. 

Union Proposal No. 6 — Various revisions 
and additions 

(a) The Union requests that the Com- 
pany be required, in providing meals, to 
supply fresh fruit in season each day. I 
recommend against this proposal; such a 
provision should not be contained in the 
collective agreement although the providing 
of fresh fruit periodically may be a topic 
that may be discussed between the Union's 
representatives and the ship's officers from 
time to time during the term of an agree- 
ment. 

(b) The Union claims there is insuflfident 
space in the forecastle of the vessel for crew 
members to hang their oil skins and other 
heavy working gear and requests that a 
locker be provided for the purpose. The 
Company agrees in principle and indicates 
a willingness to investigate the availability 
of space for the purpose. This Board can 
do no more than recommend in favour of 
the proposal in principle; we cannot physic- 
ally inspect the vessel and indicate the space 
we think is available. We recommend that 
the parties be asked to negotiate further for 
the provision of this space. 

(c) The Union requests that a washing 
machine be provided for men who wish 
to wash their clothes. The Company stated 
the electrical system of the vessel will not 
permit the installation of a washing machine 
except at very high cost. I recommend 
against this proposal for that reason but 
draw your attention to the comments in 
sub-paragraph (e) below which may pro- 
vide a satisfactory answer to this request. 

(d) The Union requests a fifteen minute 
coffee break in the afternoon. The contract 
already provides for a fifteen minute coffee 
break in the morning. From descriptions of 
the shifts worked by the personnel of the 
Princess Helene I am satisfied that all mem- 
bers of the crew have ample free time in 
the late afternoon during which they can 
have coffee. Apparently the situation is 
different in the morning where all crew 
members work more or less continuously 
until dinner time. I therefor recommend 
against this proposal. 



(e) The Union requests that cover-alls 
be supplied at Company expense for dirty 
work. The Company indicated a willingness 
to consider this proposal and I recommend 
that the Company provide cover-alls for 
those employees of the crew working on 
jobs where their clothes will get covered 
by oil, grease or other unusual dirt. In 
their comments on this proposal, Company 
representatives indicated that if cover-alls 
were provided there would probably be 
laundry arrangements made to keep them 
clean. Therefor if this request is imple- 
mented it should satisfy the Union's request 
for the providing of a washing machine. 

(f) The present agreement requires the 
Company to pay overtime rates for time 
actually worked under engine room deck 
plates in position. This clause refers to 
space in the bilge under the engine room 
deck plates. Working conditions in this 
area are very difficult when plates are in 
position since the men have to work in a 
prone position. 

However, if these plates which are remov- 
able, are lifted, there is not the same diffi- 
culty as when the men work under normal 
conditions; therefor I recommend that this 
clause remain as at present. 

(g) The Union requests that the ship 
not operate on Christmas Day and remain 
docked in Saint John to enable all em- 
ployees to stay at home. The Princess 
Helene is part of the Company's railway 
operations, a continuous service industry, 
which must operate every day of the year. 
The Company is not able to comply with 
this request and I therefor recommend 
against it. 

Retroactivity 

Considering that the Union did not pre- 
sent its demands until a month and one-half 
after the reopening date of the contract, 
that the Company did not present its de- 
mands until twenty days after receiving the 
Union's demands and that, if my recom- 
mendation is accepted, the Company will 
not be able to take action to increase its 
revenue until after the settlement with its 
non-operating employees and is therefor not 
unduly prejudiced by delay in these negotia- 
tions, I recommend that the recommenda- 
tions of this report be made retroactive to 
July 15, 1960. 

In conclusion the members of the Board 
wish to take this opportunity of expressing 
their thanks to the representatives of both 
the Union and the Company for appearing 
before them for their assistance given the 
Board, for having done a thorough and 
painstaking job in presenting their cases 



52 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



and for the high level of the discussions 
at the hearings. The members of the Board 
would like also to assure both the Union 
and the Company that the conclusions 
reached and the recommendations made 
herein have not been arrived at without 
giving careful consideration as well as a 
great deal of thought and study to the prob- 
lems presented to them. They also earnestly 
hope that their efforts on behalf of both 
parties will be of some value to them in 



settling their problems and that eventually 
a fair and just collective agreement will 
come out of their deliberations leading to 
continued cordial relations between manage- 
ment and employees. 

Dated this 7th day of November, 1960. 
(Sgd.) K. L. Crowell, 
Chairman. 

(Sgd.) E. Neil McKelvey, 
Member. 



MINORITY REPORT 



It appears that the Board has been placed 
in the position of making a recommendation 
on all the Union and Company requests 
since neither party showed any willingness 
to depart from their original positions. The 
Company argued that they are in no position 
to grant any wage increases and the Union 
showed no signs of departing from a de- 
mand for a 30 per cent increase. 

Insofar as the majority report of the 
Board is concerned, I have concurred in all 
matters with the exception of the recom- 
mendation on "Union Proposal No. 1, 
Wage Increase of 30 per cent" appearing 
on pages 7 to 10, and "Retroactivity" re- 
ferred to on page 18 of the report. 

It is regrettable that the report could 
not be unanimous but I trust that those 
sections of the report that all members of 
the Board have agreed to will assist the 
parties in finally settling the dispute. 



Union Proposal No. 1 — Wage increase of 

30 per cent (Minority Report) 

In my estimation both parties have placed 
us in the position of doing their negotiating 
for them which is not the purpose of a 
board of conciliation insofar as I am con- 
cerned. Taking into consideration the reluct- 
ance of either party to move, I recommend 
that the Union demands for a wage increase 
remain at 30 per cent and that the parties 
use any method at their disposal to reach 
a final settlement. 

Retroactivity (Minority Report) 

I recommend that whatever settlement 
might be arrived at be made retroactive 
to the expiration date of the previous agree- 
ment. 

I wish to thank all concerned for their 
co-operation during the Board hearing. 

Dated this 7th day of November, 1960. 

(Sgd.) Gerald N. Keddy, 
Member. 



15-IVIan Presidential Commission to Study U.S. Work-Rule Dispute 

United States Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell was appointed at the end of 
December to head a Presidential commission that will seek to find a solution to labour- 
management disputes over railroad work rules. His appointment was recommended by 
both parties to the dispute. 

On a number of occasions, the issue has approached strike stage. During mid-October 
Mr. Mitchell achieved an agreement between the railroads and the operating unions that 
led to the creation of the commission to deal with the problem. 

At the same time as he appointed Mr. Mitchell to head the 15-member commission, 
President Eisenhower named four other public members, and approved the five members 
nominated by each of the parties to the dispute. 

The group can only make recommendations after its scheduled one-year study is 
completed. But it can seek to persuade the industry and the unions to go along with 
recommendations during that time. 

Union members of the commission are: A. F. Zimmerman, Assistant Grand Chief 
Engineer, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers; S. C. Phillips, Assistant President, 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen; S. W. Holliday, Vice-President, 
Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen; H. F. Sites, Vice-President, Brotherhood 
of Railroad Trainmen; and J. W. Fallon, Vice-President, Switchmen's Union of North 
America. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



53 



Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 
Releases Decisions in Three Recent Cases 



The Canadian Railway Board of Adjust- 
ment No. 1 has released its decision in 
three oases heard on November 8. 

One of the cases concerned the running 
of a diesel engine and steam car without 
a conductor. A second dispute arose out of 
the question of whether employees working 
in or with extra gangs could be required 
to accumulate rest days. The third dispute 
concerned disputed time claims by a con- 
ductor and crew for time held away from 
their home terminal in excess of 16 hours. 

The contention of the employees was 
sustained in one case and not sustained in 
another; the third case was dismissed. 

Summaries of the three cases, Nos. 748 
to 750, are given below. 

Case No. 748 — Dispute between Algoma 
Central and Hudson Bay Railway and 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, ex parte, 
concerning the running of a diesel engine 
with steam generator attached without a 
conductor. 

When the steam car of a passenger train 
failed, the trainmen on the train were 
instructed to remain at the scene while the 
diesel and steam car were cut into a freight 
train to be taken back a distance of 23 miles 
for a replacement. 

The engineer and fireman went with the 
diesel and generator and returned with 
another steam car. The union contended 
that a member of the passenger train crew 
should have gone with the engineer and 
fireman. 

It quoted an article of the current agree- 
ment between the company and the union, 
which stated that when, on account of 
engine failure or some similar reason, one 
member of the crew is required to pilot an 
engine, the crew should be paid as a unit. 
The crew in this instance should be paid 
round-trip mileage between the scene of 
the breakdown and the place where the 
replacement was picked up, the Brotherhood 
said. 

A general order of the Board of Railway 
Commissioners stating that no light engine, 
or two or more light engines coupled, shall 
be run a greater distance than 25 miles in 
any one direction without a conductor did 
not allow the company to run a diesel 
engine and steam car 23 miles without a 
conductor, the union said. 

The company contended that steam 
generator units coupled to a locomotive 
were considered part of the locomotive, and 
that consequently, according to the same 



Board of Transport Commissioners' order 
quoted by the union, it was not necessary 
to provide a pilot for a distance of 25 miles 
or less. The company also quoted an article 
in its agreement with the union which stated 
that "Steam generator unit in service and 
coupled to the locomotive will not be in- 
cluded in the count of cars." 

The Board referred the case back to the 
parties, asking them to try to write a rule 
to cover the handling of steam generator 
units. They could not agree on a rule. The 
Board, saying that it was not its function 
to write rules, then dismissed the case. 

Case No. 749 — Dispute between Ontario 
Northland Railway and Brotherhood of 
Maintenance of Way Employees over 
whether employees working in or with extra 
gangs can be required to accumulate rest 
days. 

Since the introduction of the five-day 
week in 1951 it has been the practice on the 
Ontario Northland Railway for employees 
covered by the agreement setting up the 
five-day, 40-hour week who were working 
in or with extra gangs to work on Satur- 
days, one of their assigned rest days, at 
straight time rate until 10 such days have 
accumulated. They are then laid off until the 
10 days have been used up consecutively. 

The union contended that this practice 
was contrary to the agreement, and that 
work performed by these employees on 
the sixth day should be paid for at time 
and a half. 

The wage agreement, which applied to all 
employees except those specifically excepted, 
provided, among other things, for two rest 
days in each seven, the rest days to be 
consecutive as far as possible, with the 
preference being given to Saturday and 
Sunday and then to Sunday and Monday. In 
any dispute regarding the necessity for 
departing from the rule concerning rest days, 
the agreement stipulated that the company 
must show that such departure was neces- 
sary to meet operational requirements, and 
to avoid additional relief service or work- 
ing an employee on an assigned rest day. 

The employees concerned in the dispute 
were not among those excepted, the Brother- 
hood contended. 

Another clause of the agreement quoted 
by the union provided that employees 
required to work on regularly assigned rest 
days, except when these are being accumul- 
ated under another clause of the agreement, 
were to be paid time and a half. 



54 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



The employees concerned in the dispute, 
because it was not necessary for them to 
work on Saturdays because of operational 
requirements, should therefore be paid time 
and a half for work done on the sixth day 
of the work week, the union declared. 

The company in its contention quoted 
the section of the agreement that provided 
for the accumulation of rest days. This 
section provided that, "on positions where 
it is not reasonably practicable to provide 
regular relief each week," rest days might 
be accumulated and granted at a later date. 
Such accumulation was not to exceed 10 
days, and the days so accumulated were to 
be allowed consecutively when 10 days had 
been accumulated. It was also provided 
that accumulation of a greater number of 
rest days might be mutually arranged, as 
might their allowance at longer intervals. 

In accordance with this last provision, 
the company said, a conference was held by 
the company with the Maintenance of Way 
Committee in June 1951 to deal with prob- 
lems that had arisen as a result of the 
establishment of the five-day week on June 
1 that year. It was agreed then that for 
employees in seasonal work service, rest 
days might be accumulated on a seasonal 
basis. The employees were to work six 
days a week and were to be paid at pro 
rata rates. The rest days accumulated were 
to be allowed to each employee when sea- 
sonal work was completed, and without pay. 
The arrangement came into effect on July 
1, 1951. 

This arrangement, the company stated, 
had been in effect for the 1951 work season; 
but early in 1952 the General Chairman 
of the Brotherhood had informed the com- 
pany that the men did not like accumulating 
rest days on a seasonal basis, and that they 
would prefer to take time off after 10 days 
had been accumulated. This request had 
been put into effect for the 1952 season 
and had remained in effect ever since. 

The company stated further that it under- 
stood that under this section of the wage 
agreement it had the right to accumulate 
up to 10 days without further consent by 
the union, and such consent was necessary 
only when there was a question of accum- 
ulating more than 10 days. The arrange- 
ments made with the men seemed to show 
that they had the same understanding in 
1951 and 1952, the company added. 

The contention of the employees was 
sustained, with the proviso that no retro- 
active payment be made. 

Case No. 750 — Dispute between Canadian 
National Railways (Central Region) and 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, ex parte, 



concerning claims by a conductor and crew 
for time held away from home terminal in 
excess pf 16 hours. 

A conductor and crew whose home ter- 
minal was Mimico were regularly assigned 
to the run between Mimico and Capreol 
and return, operating over the Bala Sub- 
division from Toronto to South Parry and 
over another subdivision from South Parry 
to Capreol. 

On six dates they submitted claims for 
time held at Capreol in excess of 16 hours, 
basing the claims on an article in the agree- 
ment that provides for payment for the 
first eight hours in each 24 after 16 hours 
at an away-from-home terminal. 

In its submission to the Board of Adjust- 
ment the Brotherhood cited articles in the 
agreement which provided that: 

— ^Trainmen in regular assigned freight 
service will be used to operate the first 
unassigned train out of an away-from-home 
terminal when their regular train is reported 
four hours late or is cancelled. 

— ^Trainmen in unassigned freight crews 
will not be run on other than their own 
freight section or assigned territory except 
in cases of shortage of men on such other 
territory. 

The union stated that unassigned crews 
were established at Mimico to operate all 
extra trains between Mimico and South 
Parry, and at Capreol to operate all extra 
trains between Capreol and South Parry. The 
union contended that Mimico-assigned crews 
could therefore not be used in unassigned 
service from Capreol, nor Capreol-assigned 
crews from Mimico, because the assigned 
crews were operating in the recognized 
subdivisions of the unassigned crews. 

There is no provision in the current agree- 
ment for establishing assignments for crews 
in freight service to operate beyond the 
recognized freight section or subdivision of 
any particular terminal, the Brotherhood 
contended. 

The company in its contention stated that 
the article quoted by the union which pro- 
vided for the setting up of runs of assigned 
crews imposed no restriction as to the num- 
ber of subdivisions over which the crews 
could operate. 

Under this article a freight assignment 
had been set up in October 1958 to operate 
between Mimico and Capreol, via the Bala 
and Sudbury subdivisions. All this territory 
was in the same seniority district. Since this 
pool of runs had been set up, the company 
said, there had been only two complaints. 

{Continued on page 72) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 796 1 



55 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 



Manitoba court finds Labour Relations Board not empowered to order vote on 
decertification. Saskatchewan court rules on nature of membership of Labour 
Relations Board. Ontario court upholds an order of Labour Relations Board 



In Manitoba, the Court of Queen's Bench 
found that the Manitoba Labour Relations 
Act does not empower the Labour Relations 
Board to order a representation vote on 
application for decertification of a bargain- 
ing agent. 

In Saskatchewan, the Court of Appeal 
ruled that members of the Labour Relations 
Board, once they are appointed, cease to 
represent the particular segments of the 
community from which they were appointed 
and become members of the Board as a 
whole, a body with quasi judicial and 
administrative functions, and that the Board 
may accordingly function in the absence of 
one member, so long as a quorum is 
present. 

In Ontario, the High Court, dismissing an 
application to quash a Labour Relations 
Board's order, ruled that in certiorari pro- 
ceedings the Court cannot review the deci- 
sion of the Board on the basis of the 
Board's evaluation of, the credibility of 
evidence. 

Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench . . . 

. . . denies {urisdiction of Labour Relations Board 
to conduct representation vote on decertification 

On August 3, 1960, Mr. Justice Bastin 
of the Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench 
quashed an order of the Manitoba Labour 
Relations Board to hold a representation 
vote on a decertification application and 
ruled that, in dealing with the revocation 
of the certificate of a bargaining agent, 
the Board has no jurisdiction under the 
Manitoba Labour Relations Act to take a 
vote. 

If it had the power to take a vote, the 
Board should have confined the vote to the 
striking employees with the exclusion of 
those workers who were hired to replace 
those on strike. Further, the Court ruled 
that under Section 2 (2) of the Act, striking 
workmen are "employees" within the mean- 



ing of the Act in spite of their dismissal by 
their employer after the strike for the 
reason that they had not reported for work. 

The circumstances of the dispute, as 
related by Mr. Justice Bastin, were as 
follows. 

On July 5, 1944, the Manitoba Wartime 
Labour Relations Board certified Local 255 
of the United Packinghouse Workers of 
America as bargaining agent for all the 
plant employees of Brandon Packers Lim- 
ited except foremen. On February 29, 1960, 
after complying with the requirements of 
the Manitoba Labour Relations Act, the 
company's employees went on strike. The 
company gave notice to the striking em- 
ployees that they should return to work and 
in default of their doing so it gave them 
notice of dismissal. 

The company then applied to the Mani- 
toba Labour Board to decertify Local 255 
as the bargaining agent of the designated 
unit appropriate for collective bargaining. 
After a hearing, the Board made an order 
dated June 21, 1960, directing the taking 
of a vote of those employed in the plant 
for wages on that date. Apparently, the 
Board's order was based on the assumption 
that the striking workmen were no longer 
employees and were therefore no longer 
members of the unit appropriate for collec- 
tive bargaining established in 1944. 

On June 24, 1960, the Board issued a 
further order suspending its direction for a 
vote pending an opinion from the Attorney- 
General whether, in the light of Section 
2 (2) of the Act, persons who withdraw 
their services in the course of a legal strike, 
and who are thereupon served by the em- 
ployer with notices of dismissal for the 
reason that they have not reported for work, 
are employees entitled to vote upon a repre- 
sentation vote ordered in the course of 
an application for decertification of the 
certified bargaining agent which called the 



This section, prepared by the Legislative Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



56 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



strike. Apparently, the opinion of the 
Attorney-General was that Section 2 (2) of 
the Labour Relations Act made the striking 
workmen employees within the meaning of 
the Act in spite of the action of the em- 
ployer in dismissing them. 

Mr. Justice Bastin agreed with this 
opinion. He stressed that both strikes and 
lockouts are lawful weapons in industrial 
disputes as part of the process of arriving 
at collective agreements and it was not in 
the contemplation of the Legislature that 
an employer could make a lawful strike a 
ground for depriving an employee of rights 
which he otherwise was entitled to. The 
words in the subsection, "within the meaning 
of this Act," indicate an intention to create 
a category of striking employee distinct 
from an employee working for wages and 
it is not within the power of the employer 
to defeat this intention. 

On July 7, 1960, the Board, in the light 
of the Attorney General's opinion, ordered: 

(a) That a representation vote be taken to 
determine whether or not the affected 
employees desire to continue to be repre- 
sented by Local 255; 

(b) that those affected and eligible to vote 
shall be 

(1) those who were employed at the 
plant for wages on June 21, 1960, 
except foremen, and within the unit 
certified, and 

(2) those who were on the payroll of 
the employer at the pay day immed- 
iately prior to February 29, 1960 
(the date of the beginning of the 
strike), except foremen, within the 
unit certified and who had not since 
then effectively removed themselves 
from the then bargaining unit; 

(c) that the two groups should cast their 
ballots in separate ballot boxes and no 
eligible voter could be included in the 
voters' lists of both groups. 

Following the Board's order of July 7, 
1960, the company applied to the Court 
for an order of prohibition to prohibit the 
Board from holding a representative vote. 
At the same time the striking employees 
sought an order of certiorari to quash the 
order of July 7, 1960. 

In Mr. Justice Bastin's view, the Manitoba 
Labour Board, in dealing with the applica- 
tion for decertification, erred not only as 
to the effect to be given to Section 2 (2) of 
the Act, but also as to the meaning of the 
word "unit" as used in the expression 
"unit appropriate for collective bargaining." 
Section 2(3) defines "unit" as a group of 
employees, and the various sections which 
refer to a "unit appropriate for collective 
bargaining", indicate that the power to 
designate such a unit rests with the Board. 



There is nothing, Mr. Justice Bastin 
added, in the Act establishing the principle 
that "once a unit, always a unit," or that 
the composition of the unit cannot be 
changed, or that its composition must be 
related to designated categories of em- 
ployees. It is for the Board to decide what 
group of employees at any given moment 
is a unit appropriate for collective bar- 
gaining. The words "appropriate for collec- 
tive bargaining" embody the idea of a 
group of employees having common eco- 
nomic interests so that it is just and equit- 
able that they should be represented by one 
bargaining agent. 

Prior to the strike. Local 255 represented 
the majority of the employees in the unit 
which had been designated as a unit appro- 
priate for collective bargaining. A strike, 
being a means to induce the employer to 
agree to employees' demands, if successful, 
must lead to further collective bargaining. 
It would appear, Mr. Justice Bastin added, 
to be consistent with the purpose of the 
Act that there should be continuity of 
representation during the negotiations fol- 
lowing the calling of a strike. From the 
standpoint of their economic interests, the 
striking employees remain a group quite 
distinct from the workmen hired to replace 
them. In his opinion, the Board has a duty 
to recognize this fact by treating the strikers 
as a unit appropriate for collective bar- 
gaining. The Board would therefore con- 
sider revoking the certification of the 
bargaining agent of the strikers only if it 
formed the opinion that it no longer repre- 
sented a majority of the striking employees. 
In forming this opinion, it would not be 
influenced by the views of workmen who 
had been hired to replace the strikers. If it 
had the power to take a vote, the Board 
should have confined the vote to the striking 
employees. 

Although the Board proceeded, in Mr. 
Justice Bastin's opinion, upon a wrong 
principle in dealing with the application for 
decertification, he thought it was not neces- 
sary for him to decide whether the Board's 
action amounted to excess of authority 
which would justify quashing the order of 
July 7, 1960. He decided to quash the 
order on the ground that, in dealing with 
the revocation of the certificate of a bargain- 
ing agent, the Board has been given no 
power to take a vote. 

Counsel for the Board, relying on Reg. 
V. Labour Relations Board; Ex parte Lawson 
Motors Ltd. (L.G. 1954, p. 676), argued 
that the taking of a vote was merely a 
means of obtaining information and that 
the Board has a wide discretion as to how 
to obtain information. Mr. Justice Bastin 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



57 



was of the opinion that the Board had not 
been given, in express terms, any power 
to take a vote in deciding whether it should 
revoke the certificate of a bargaining agent. 
The only mention of the taking of a vote 
is in Section 9, which deals with the certifi- 
cation of a bargaining agent. 

The reference in Section 9 to the hold- 
ing of a vote, in Mr. Justice Bastin's 
opinion, is for the specified purpose of 
dealing with an application for certification 
and cannot be construed as giving the 
Board the right to take a vote whenever 
it finds it convenient. Although the Court 
should not put too narrow a construction 
on the words of the Act, on the other hand 
it is not justified in assuming that the Legis- 
lature intended to imply powers in the 
Board which it could have expressed in 
clear terms. 

Mr, Justice Bastin referred to the deci- 
sion of the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal 
in Re Trade Union Act; Simpson-Sears Ltd. 
V. Department Store Organizing Committee, 
Local 1004 (L.G. 1957, p. 68), where the 
Court held that prerequisite to the power 
of the Board to direct a vote was for the 
Board to determine that the voters belonged 
to an appropriate bargaining unit, and as 
the Board had not done this, there was no 
jurisdiction to take the order directing a 
vote. In this connection, Mr. Justice Gordon 
said: 

. . . The only power of the Board to direct a 
vote is contained in Section 6 of the Trade 
Union Act, RSS 1953, ch. 259, and I am per- 
fectly certain that under this Section no vote 
can be directed until an appropriate unit of 
employees has been determined under Section 
5 (2) of the Act, With every deference to the 
argument of Mr. Carter that such vote could 
be directed for the information of the Board, 
I do not think that the Board can direct a 
vote under Section 6 to get any information 
which it should get under Section 15 of the 
Act, which gives the Board and its agents 
the power of a commissioner under the Public 
Inquiries Act, R.S.S. 1953, ch, 15. 

Mr. Justice Bastin agreed with the reason- 
ing of Mr. Justice Gordon and quashed 
the board's order of July 7, 1960. Re Bran- 
don Packers Limited (1960), 33 WWR. Part 
2. p. 58. 

Saskatchewan Court ot Appeal. . . 

. . . rule that members of Labour Relations Board, 
once appointed, cease to represent special group 

On November 8, 1960, the Saskatchewan 
Court of Appeal dismissed an application 
on behalf of the British American Oil 
Company Limited for a writ of prohibition 
preventing the Saskatchewan Labour Rela- 
tions Board from proceeding with the 
examination of an application that was 
pending before the Board. The reason for 



the company's application was that one 
member of the Board representing the 
general public was not available. The full 
Board heard part of the application and 
then adjourned; when the hearing was 
resumed, a member of the Board, originally 
appointed as a representative of the general 
public, was absent. 

Mr. Justice Gordon, in rendering the judg- 
ment of the Court, recalled that under 
Section 4 of the Saskatchewan Trade Union 
Act, the Board must consist of seven mem- 
bers, a chairman, and two representatives 
of organized employees, two representatives 
of organized employers, and, if the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor in Council deems it desir- 
able, two members of the general public. 
In fact, two members of the Board have 
been appointed representatives of organized 
employees, two of employers, and two repre- 
sentatives of the general public. 

The company claimed that the Legisla- 
ture had so constituted the Board that if 
the representation on the hearing of an 
application before the Board was out of 
balance, the Board would have no jurisdic- 
tion. The Court was of the opinion that 
Section 4 of the Act does not support such 
a contention. It is true that the Legisla- 
ture has directed that the Board is to be 
formed of certain representatives, but once 
appointed, they become the Labour Rela- 
tions Board with quasi judicial and very 
important administrative duties, which re- 
quire the exercise of the utmost good faith 
on the part of all members of the Board. 
Further, once appointed, they become mem- 
bers of the Board as a whole and are not 
supposed to advocate the cause of the 
faction they represented when appointed. 

Section 4 (2) provides that a majority 
of the members of the Board shall con- 
stitute a quorum; Section 4 (3) provides 
that "a decision of the majority of the 
members of the Board present and con- 
stituting a quorum shall be the decision of 
the Board." 

According to Mr. Justice Gordon, this 
means that if the Board, as it was first 
constituted when hearing a case, should be 
reduced through the absence of a member 
for any cause, a majority of the members 
of the Board present, constituting a quorum, 
could give the decision of the Board. 

In conclusion, the Court held that the 
Board constituted for the purposes of the 
application pending before the Board, in 
spite of the absence of one member, could 
proceed to exercise all the powers given to 
the Board under the Act, providing that 
there was a quorum present. 

The company's application for the writ 
of prohibition was refused. 



58 



THB LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



In Re British American Oil Company 
Limited, and the Saskatchewan Labour 
Relations Board, and Oil, Chemical and 
Atomic Workers International Union, Local 
16-595, the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal, 
November 8, 1960, unreported. 

Ontario High Court... 

. . . rules court in certiorari proceedings cannot 
review Board decision made on basis of credibility 

On July 11, 1960, Mr. Justice Stewart of 
the Ontario High Court refused to quash 
an order of the Ontario Labour Relations 
Board dismissing an application for a declar- 
ation terminating bargaining rights of a 
certified trade union, and held that, in 
certiorari proceedings, the court cannot 
review or correct the Board's ruling based 
on credibility, although, in the opinion of 
the Court, the Board's approach to credibil- 
ity of evidence was wrong. 

On September 13, 1954, Local 448 of 
the Retail, Wholesale, Hotel and Restaurant 
Employees' Union was certified by the 
Labour Relations Board as a bargaining 
agent of the employees of the Empire House 
hotel in London. Out of the approximately 
15 hotel employees, about 12 in the bargain- 
ing unit were represented by the union. 

On February 13, 1958, an application was 
filed with the Board for a declaration ter- 
minating bargaining rights of Local 448. 
Attached to the application was a petition 
signed by ten employees who stated that 
they no longer wished to be represented 
by the union. One of the signatures was 
that of Kenneth Eaton. 

On March 3, 1958, the application for 
decertification was heard by the Board 
according to Section 41 (3) of the Ontario 
Labour Relations Act, which reads as 
follows 

Upon an application under subsection 1 or 2, 
the Board shall ascertain whether a majority 
of the employees in the bargaining unit have 
signified in writing that they no longer wish 
to be represented by the trade union and, if 
a majority so signify, the Board shall, unless 
the trade union concerned informs the Board 
that it does not desire to continue to represent 
the employees in the bargaining unit, by a 
representation vote, satisfy itself that a majority 
of the employees desire that the right of the 
trade union to bargain on their behalf be 
terminated. 

Prior to the hearing, the Board informed 
the applicants that the union claimed that 
there was an irregularity in respect of the 
signature of Kenneth Eaton on the petition 
supporting the application, and that the 
Board intended to conduct an inquiry at 
the hearing into the validity of Eaton's 
signature. 

Counsel for the applicants, in an affidavit 
presented to the Court, claimed that at the 



hearing Sims and Eaton gave evidence to 
the eflfect that Sims had telephoned Eaton 
soliciting his signature but Eaton was then 
ill and authorized Sims to ascribe his 
(Eaton's) signature to the petition. 

The Chairman of the Board, in his affi- 
davit to the court, stated that his notes 
regarding the evidence given by Eaton at 
the hearing did not show any mention that 
Eaton was ill at the time when Sims was 
seeking signatures to the decertification 
petition. The Chairman's affidavit suggested 
that Eaton, Sims, and counsel for the appli- 
cants were inaccurate in their version as 
to what occurred at the Board's hearing 
of March 3, 1958. 

On February 10, 1959, the Board dis- 
missed the application for decertification on 
the grounds that the document filed by the 
applicants in support of the application for 
decertification bore the purported signature 
of one employee who did not sign the 
document. As the applicants failed to dis- 
close that fact to the Board until after it 
had been brought to the Board's attention 
by the union, the Board could nt place 
any reliance on any of the evidence sub- 
mitted by the applicants, and the application 
for decertification had to be dismissed. 

Mr. Justice Stewart, commenting on the 
Board's decision, said that he was provided 
with affidavits from all the signatories to 
the petition (with the exception of one 
person), all of whom stated that they had 
signed the petition. The Board held the 
investigation as to alleged fraud regarding 
one signature and a satisfactory explanation 
was given at a proper and reasonable time. 
Further, in Mr. Justice Stewart's opinion, 
the petition containing nine out of eleven 
or twelve signatures, the validity of which 
was not denied, was properly presented to 
the Board. Nevertheless, the Board saw fit 
to dispose of the matter on the grounds of 
credibility, implying that at least five other 
signatures besides Eaton's were forged. In 
Mr. Justice Stewart's view, this suggestion 
seemed obvious, for had the Board accepted 
the validity of all the signatories with the 
exception of that of Eaton, it would have 
been bound to order a representation vote 
under Section 41 (3) of the Act. 

Mr. Justice Stewart thought that the 
Board's approach to the question of credibil- 
ity in the case was utterly wrong, but he 
felt that he could not remedy the situation 
since, in certiorari proceedings, he could 
not review or correct a finding made n the 
basis of credibility. Accordingly, the appli- 
cation to quash the Board's order was dis- 
missed. Chowen and Sims v. Ontario Labour 
Relations Board, (1960), 24 D.L.R. (2d), 
Part 9, p. 656. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



59 



Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

Alberta, Saskatchewan adopt latest edition ot C.S.A. Safety Code for Elevators 



In Alberta, the second edition of the 
C.S.A. Safety Code for Elevators, Dumb- 
waiters and Escalators (B44-60) has been 
adopted as regulations under the Factories 
Act, with the addition of a new section 
relating to layout drawings and authority 
for enforcement. The regulations under the 
Electrical Protection Act relating to elec- 
trical installations and equipment in oilfields 
were amended. 

In Saskatchewan, revised regulations under 
the Passenger and Freight Elevator Act also 
adopted the new code. 

Alberta Electrical Protection Act 

Alberta has issued Reg. 343/60 under the 
Electrical Protection Act, further amending 
Reg. 414/59 (L.G., Mar. 1960, p. 282). 
Gazetted November 15, the amendment 
makes a number of changes in the rules 
relating to electrical installations and equip- 
ment in oilfields. 

Alberta Factories Act 

Alberta has issued Reg. 261/60 adopting 
as regulations under the Factories Act the 
Canadian Standards Association B44-1960 
Safety Code for Elevators, Dumbwaiters 
and Escalators ( Second Edition). The new 
regulation, gazetted August 31, came into 
force on January 1, 1961, rescinding Reg. 
429/57. 

Reg. 262/60, amending Reg. 261/60, was 
also gazetted August 31. It adds two sections 
to provisions set out in the Code. These 
sections relate to layout drawings and speci- 
fications and authority for enforcement. The 
effective date was January 1, 1960. 

Another order, Reg. 263/60, gazetted 
August 31, provides regulations governing 
periodic inspections and tests of passenger 
and freight elevators, escalators and dumb- 
waiters. The regulations came into force on 
January 1, 1961, and apply to all existing 
passenger and freight elevators, escalators 
and dumbwaiters and all new passenger and 
freight elevators, escalators and dumb- 
waiters after being placed in service. 

The new provisions require that each 
installation be inspected annually by the 
Department of Labour. If an inspector notes 
conditions that contravene the Code or good 
operating practice, he must bring them to 
the attention of the owner, who must take 
whatever remedial action is ordered. Where 
an immediate hazard to persons exists, the 
inspector may order the installation out of 
service. 



An inspector is empowered to require an 
owner to carry out tests designed to ensure 
the safe operation of an installation. Where 
an installation is placed out of service for 
a definite period, periodic inspection and 
tests may be discontinued, but it must be 
inspected before it can be operated again. 

Saskatchewan Passenger and Freight Elevator Act 

New regulations have been issued under 
the Saskatchewan Passenger and Freight 
Elevator Act. Approved by O.C. 1798/60, 
gazetted November 10, they rescind O.C. 
2191/49 (L.G. 1950, p. 227), as amended 
by O.C. 1634/50. 

The requirements of the new regulations 
are mainly the same as before, but new 
provisions have been introduced in respect 
to the application of the Canadian Standards 
Association Safety Code for Elevators, 
Dumbwaiters and Escalators; safety tests 
and operators' licences. 

The regulations formerly specified that 
the C.S.A. Elevator Code was to be com- 
plied with "where required" by the regula- 
tions. The new regulations provide that 
the Code "shall be complied with as require- 
ments under section 18 of the Act." 

The following additional elevating devices 
are now excluded from the regulations: 
portable tiering or piling machines used to 
move material to and from storage and 
located and operating entirely within one 
storey; equipment for feeding or positioning 
materials at machine tools, printing presses, 
furnaces, etc.; hoists for raising or lowering 
materials and which are provided with 
unguided hoods, slings, and similar means 
for attachment to the materials; lubrication 
hoists or similar mechanisms; wharf ramps; 
amusement devices; stage and orchestra 
lifts; lift bridges; railroad car lifts or 
dumpers; and devices having a travel of less 
than one storey, but not exceeding five 
feet and used only for the transfer of 
material or equipment. The Code does not 
apply to any of these devices. 

A new provision requires that if an 
inspection of an installation indicates that 
safety tests are necessary, the owner must 
be requested to have the car or counter- 
weight, or both, tested by a person licensed 
under the Act other than an operator. The 
owner must submit a report to the Depart- 
ment of Labour on completion of the test. 
The installation may be sealed by the 
Department if tests are not performed. 

(Continued on page 7g) 



60 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 796? 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Initial and renewal claims for unemployment insurance during October up 27 per 
cent from previous month and 18 per cent from October 1959, statistics* show 



Claimants t for unemployment insurance 
benefit on October 31 numbered 330,200, 
an increase of 18 per cent over the total of 
279,500 on September 30, and 32 per cent 
higher than the figure of 250,600 on October 
31, 1959. 

The number of male claimants was 40 
per cent greater than at the same time last 
year; the number of female claimants 16 
per cent greater. 

The number of persons on claim for 13 
weeks or more at October 31 was 42 per 
cent higher than at the same time last year. 
About one in five of the 230,000 male 
claimants had been on claim for this length 
of time; among females, the proportion was 
one in three. Females comprised 41 per 
cent of the longer term claimants but 
amounted to only 30 per cent of all 
claimants. 

Initial and renewal claims for benefit 
during October numbered 178,200, which 
was 27 per cent more than the September 
total of 149,300 and 18 per cent above 
the total of 151,200 in October 1959. Com- 
pared with the previous year's figure, re- 
newal claims were 35 per cent higher, but 
initial claims increased by only 8 per cent. 

The average weekly number of bene- 
ficiaries was estimated at 225,900 for Octo- 
ber, 222,700 for September, and 159,800 
for October 1959. 

Benefit payments totalled $20,700,000 in 
October, $21,200,000 in September, and 
$13,800,000 in October 1959. 

The average weekly benefit payment was 
$22.86 in October, $22.65 in September 
and $20.51 in October last year. 

Insurance Registrations 

Reports received from local oflfices of the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission for 
October showed that insurance books or 

* See Tables E-1 to E-4 at back of this issue. 

t A claimant's unemployment register is placed in 
the "live file" at the local office as soon as the claim 
is forwarded for computation. As a result, the count 
of claimants at any given time inevitably includes 
some whose claims are in progress. 



In a comparison of current employment 
statistics with those for a previous period, 
consideration should be given to relevant 
factors other than numbers such as the 
opening and closing of seasonal industries, 
increase in area population, influence of 
weather conditions, and the general employ- 
ment situation. 

Claimants should not be interpreted either 
as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total 
job applicants." 



contribution cards had been issued to 
4,822,055 employees who had made contri- 
butions to the Unemployment Insurance 
Fund since April 1, 1960. 

At October 31 employers registered num- 
bered 332,149, an increase of 373 since 
September 30. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During October 5,548 investigations were 
conducted by enforcement officers across 
Canada. Of these, 1,630 were spot checks of 
postal and counter claims to verify the 
fulfilment of statutory conditions and 120 
were miscellaneous investigations. The re- 
maining 3,798 were investigations in con- 
nection with claimants suspected of making 
false statements to obtain benefit. 

Prosecutions were begun in 217 cases, 
44 against employers and 173 against 
claimants.* Punitive disqualifications as a 
result of claimants' making false statements 
or misrepresentations numbered 3,704.* 

Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received in October totalled 
$30,246,976.09 compared with $27,335,- 
026.34 in September and $23,357,196.24 in 
October 1959. Benefits paid in October 
totalled $20,650,922.40 compared with $21,- 
186,259.61 in September and $13,761,554.32 
in October 1959. 

The balance in the Fund on October 31 
was $329,072,495.46; on September 30 it 
was $319,476,441.77 and on October 31, 
1959, it was $464,834,421.33. 



* These do not necessarily relate to the investiga- 
tions conducted during this period. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



61 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB- 1781, September 29, 1960 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, single, 37 years of age, filed an initial 
application for benefit on December 23, 
1959, and stated that she had worked in 
Vancouver, B.C., as a switchboard operator 
for a wholesale electric supply company 
from April 15, 1952, to December 8, 1959, 
when "I left voluntarily. I am required to 
look after my mother who is ill. (Unem- 
ployed since 8 December). I cannot take 
any work at present during her illness." Her 
rate of pay was $52.50 a week. The em- 
ployer reported: "Leave of absence for 
urgent family reasons." 

On December 24, 1959, the local office 
wrote to the claimant asking whether there 
was anyone else who could have cared for 
her mother during her illness and whether 
she had asked for a leave of absence before 
terminating her employment. The claimant 
replied on December 29, 1959: "On giving 
my employer my notice, he suggested a 
leave of absence. I am enclosing a letter 
from the doctor who is attending my 
mother." 

The medical certificate referred to, which 
is dated December 29, 1959, reads: 

... I first saw this 71 -year old woman in 
January of 1957 because of the complications 
of arteriosclerotic heart disease, including con- 
gestive failure, a rapid atrial fibrillation, and 
more recently, cerebral vascular accidents. On 
her most recent admission to hospital in Sep- 
tember of 1959, a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus 
was also established. She has been dscharged 
to continued care at home, but is really not 
capable of looking after herself or the home 
properly. Her daughter has kindly consented 
to act as nurse, and this letter is to confirm 
the fact that a nurse is required. 

On the evidence before him, the insur- 
ance officer notified the claimant by letter 
on January 4, 1960 that she was disqualified 
from receipt of benefit (a) from December 
20, 1959 to January 16, 1960 inclusive 
because, in his opinion, she had voluntarily 
left her employment without just cause and 
(b) from December 20, 1959, also, on the 
ground that because of her domestic cir- 
cumstances, she was not available for work 
(sections 60(1) and 54 (2) (a) of the 
Act). 

On March 15, 1960, the claimant made 
the following statement: "I have no idea 
when I will be able to return to work as 
my mother is still recovering from a stroke 
and I am needed at home." 



The claimant appealed to a board of 
referees and in her submission, dated March 
23, 1960, she stated, among other things: 

In December I took a leave of absence to 
help my father care for my very sick mother 
who could not be left alone at that time . . . 

After four weeks of reporting and standing 
for some time in various queues, I finally 
received $19 each week, conmiencing February 
2nd. On March 18, I received a notice of 
overpayment, telling me I was disqualified and 
should never have received the money and 
would need to pay all back which I have 
received. I have worked 18 years and paid 
regularly into Unemployment Insurance and 
never have asked for a penny and now this . . . 

My parents are old age pensioners and I 
have earned nothing since leaving my employ- 
ment on December 8th . . . 

The insurance officer commented that the 
local office omitted to post the indefinite 
disqualification to the claimant's unemploy- 
ment register and payment of benefit was 
made from January 24, 1960 to March 12, 
1960, when the omission was discovered. 

The claimant did not attend the hearing 
of her case before a board of referees in 
Vancouver on April 26, 1960, nor was she 
represented there. The board, by a majority 
decision, dismissed the appeal and main- 
tained both the disqualifications that had 
been imposed by the insurance officer. The 
majority members held, in effect, that the 
claimant's reason for voluntarily leaving her 
employment on December 8, 1959 was a 
personal one and, regardless of how good 
that reason was, it could not be recognized 
as just cause within the meaning of the 
Act. 

As to the question of the claimant's non- 
availability for work, the majority members 
held: 

. , . Claimant should be well-aware that to 
be eligible for benefit under the Act she must 
be (a) unemployed (b) capable of and available 
for work. The claimant has fulfilled the first 
condition but on the second condition she has 
not, and her own statement substantiates 
this . . . 

The claimant appealed to the Umpire 
and stated: 

After paying Unemployment Insurance for 
18 years without ever drawing any, I should 
be entitled to some. If I had been dishonest 
(as many are) and said that I was available 
for work, turning it down, as unsuitable when- 
ever offered, everything would have been all 
right. Furthermore, as the dissenting voice on 
the Board stated, the fact is that I was paid 
benefit ($133) and it is not reasonable to expect 
that I would be paid if I was not entitled to it. 
I gave the true facts about my reason for 
unemployment at all times. 

Also, after being unemployed for practically 
four months and being of assistance to my 
parents, I am not in a position to be able 



62 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



to repay the above amount nor is it fair that 
I should be asked to do so . . . 

The appeal was not filed within the 
required period of time stipulated by section 
75 of the Act, but the Umpire allowed it to 
proceed. 

Considerations and Conclusions: By the 

claimant's own admission, she was not avail- 
able for work on the date she filed her 
claim for benefit nor thereafter because she 
was required to care for her mother, who 
was ill. 

No matter how praiseworthy her devotion 
to her mother may have been and regardless 
of how necessary her presence was required 
at home for the care of her mother, it can- 
not alter the fact that she was not in the 
labour market during the period in question. 
Consequently, as she was not available for 
work within the meaning of section 54 (2) 
(a) of the Act, she was rightly disqualified 
by the insurance officer under that section 
and I so decide. 

As to the disqualification imposed on 
the claimant for having voluntarily left her 
employment, the record shows that she 
was granted leave of absence. Consequently, 
she did not completely separate from her 
employment and she cannot be said to 
have "left" such employment within the 
meaning of that word in section 60 (1) of 
the Act. Therefore, as I consider that the 
disqualification imposed under that section 
was not justified, it must be removed and 
I so decide. 

But for this modification, the claimant's 
appeal is dismissed. 

The unfortunate omission of the local 
office employee to post the disqualification 
for non-availability to the claimant's unem- 
ployment register and the overpayment that 
resulted can have no bearing on the merits 
of the present case as the claimant, in fact, 
was not available for work. On the other 
hand, the question of the repayment of 
the benefit which was, apparently, received 
by her in good faith is a matter which can 
be dealt with only by the Commission under 
Regulations 174 and 175.* 

Decision CUB-1785, October 6, 1960 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, single, 21 years of age, filed an initial 
application for benefit on September 14, 
1959 and registered for employment as an 
auto mechanic. He stated in the application 
that he had -worked as an auto mechanic for 
a Vancouver garage from September 1957 
to August 29, 1959, when he became 



•Regulation 174 deals with the ratification of 
benefit wrongly paid, and Regulation 175 provides 
for the write-off of benefit wrongly paid under cer- 
tain circumstances, which are listed in the Regula- 
tion. 



separated from the said employment for 
the following reason: ">Laid off. Change of 
ownership, unemployed since, available for 
work and capable of work." His salary at 
the time of his separation from employment 
was $56 a week. 

In the Confirmation of Separation (Form 
UIC 479) the employer (the claimant's 
father) reported on September 17, 1959, as 
follows: 

When I sold by business ... I had to lay off 
Stan. The new owners had their own man 
and couldn't put him on payroll. Until such 
time as I get another business rolling I have 
no need for any employees. 

The claim was allowed effective Septem- 
ber 13, 1959. 

On February 11, 1960, at the request of 
the local office of the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Commission, an enforcement officer of 
the Commission interviewed the claimant 
and obtained the following statement from 
him: 

... I was formerly employed by my father . . . 
up to 29 Aug. 59. At that time he sold the 
station but he retained the back portion and 
has now opened up a body shop . . . Now that 
I am unemployed I spend all my time at these 
premises. I help out around the shop, look 
after the books and am general handyman. For 
this I receive no remuneration. The only thing, 
I do not have to pay room and board at home 
so long as I help out at the shop. When I was 
employed I paid $10.00 per week for room and 
board. I am in no way associated with the 
business except as stated above. I am available 
for work at any time and would accept employ- 
ment if it was offered to me in my registered 
occupation. I never realized that possibly I 
should have informed the office where I was 
spending my time but I am available for work 
at any time and could be contacted immediately 
if required. 

On March 17, 1960, the claimant's father, 
owner and manager of the shop, wrote to 
the local office as follows: 

In answer to your questions in your letter 
dated Mar. 16/60, I would say that Stan arrives 
at the shop between 8 a.m. & 10 a.m. and leaves 
around 5 p.m. He spends six days a week at the 
shop except when he's out looking for a job. 

If my son would have found employment 
elsewhere, it would not have been necessary 
for me to hire someone else to replace him. 
However, the shop is beginning to get on its 
feet and I am anticipating putting Stan on 
payroll at the end of March. 

In answer to question 3, the value of the 
room and board Stan would be required to pay 
is $10.00 per week. Stan will not be living 
at home after March 19th; he is getting married 
and will move to an apartment. 

The following is an extract from the 
report of the formal investigation dated 
April 12, 1960: 

Claimant stated that since he became unem- 
ployed in September 1959 he has spent prac- 
tically all his time at the shop doing odd jobs 
and looking after the books. When I called on 
11 February claimant was in the body shop 
working on a car. He states that he has been 
unemployed and available for work at all 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



63 



times. His only consideration for his efforts 
is that he does not have to pay board, which 
would amount to approximately $10.00 per 
week. 

The insurance officer notified the claim- 
ant on April 19, 1960 that he was dis- 
qualified from receipt of benefit retroactively 
to September 13, 1959, 'because, in his 
opinion, the claimant had failed to prove 
that he was unemployed as required by 
sections 54 (1) of the Act and 154 (1) of 
the Unemployment Insurance Regulations. 
The insurance officer's decision was based 
on the ground "that the claimant was per- 
forming services which are usually remuner- 
ated, was in control of his working hours, 
which constituted a full working week for 
that employment and therefore could not be 
considered employment to a minor extent". 

On behalf of the claimant his lawyer 
appealed to a board of referees on May 
19, 1960; he stated: 

This is to advise you that this office has 
been retained by [the claimant] with regard to 
your recent notification to [him] stating he 
owed an overpayment to the Commission in 
the sum of $521.00. 

This is to point out that it appears to the 
writer that such is not the case. During the 
time in question [the claimant] was definitely 
not employed in a gainful occupation wherein 
he was receiving over the sum of $10.00 per 
week. [The claimant], during the time that he 
drew unemployment insurance benefits, was 
unemployed and seeking employment from 
various places. [The claimant] has further 
advised that some of the employers that he 
inquired of were Auto Marine Electric, Mar- 
shall Pontiac Buick, Auto Electric Service, 
Taylor Pearson and Carson (Marpole Branch) 
amongst others and that at the time stated 
none of these places and others had any 
employment that [the claimant] could take. 

Further, the Unemployment Commission was 
unable to advise him of any place where [he] 
would be able to obtain a job. Therefore, rather 
than being idle from day to day and rather 
only as to occupy himself [he] assisted his 
father . . . For his services [the claimant] re- 
ceived no compensation other than the fact 
that he received at his home free board and 
room and it was considered between himself 
and his father that this would be approximately 
a payment of $10.00 per week. 

[The claimant] has further stated in an affi- 
davit taken at your office on the 11th February, 
1960 that he was willing to accept any em- 
ployment that was reasonably suitable that the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission would be 
able to advise him of. 

Under these circumstances it would then 
appear that [the claimant] does not appear to 
have violated the Act for surely it is not the 
intention of he Act to enforce idleness upon 
people who are simply waiting for work. [The 
claimant] felt under the circumstances that he 
could at least be useful to his family if he was 
incapable of earning his own living at that 
time. Further, it is suggested that [his] father 
can be contacted in this regard by the Com- 
mission and [his] father will be only too willing 
to open his books to the Commission to prove 
that he paid his son no wages for the services 
his son rendered. 



In conclusion then, the writer would like 
to point out that perhaps the Commission 
in this instance should inquire further into 
the facts of this situation as they exist before 
any decision is made as there certainly seems 
to be evidence of [the claimant's] good faith 
and of [his] total unemployment during this 
period except as aforementioned . . . 

Included in the submissions is the follow- 
ing letter dated June 8, 1960, addressed to 
the claimant by Gilley, Hunt and Wilson 
Limited, Vancouver: 

Regarding your query as to application for 
employment in our own shop, or in any Auto 
Body Shops which are customers of our firm, 
we wish to advise that you approached us 
about the middle of September last (1959), 
and that we were unfortunately unable to assist 
you in any way either directly or through 
Shops that might have placed a query with us 
concerning Body Men or Painters. 

The board of referees which heard the 
case in Vancouver on June 10, 1960, by a 
unanimous decision, dismissed the appeal 
and maintained the disqualification that had 
been imposed by the insurance officer. The 
board's decision reads: 

The claimant appeared along with members 
of his family and an accountant. In addition, 
the claimant was represented by Mr. N. M. 
Goldman, Barrister and Solicitor, who very 
eloquently and ably presented the claimant's 
side of the appeal. 

During the very lengthy hearing the Board 
accepted as facts the following: That the 
claimant genuinely tried to find work and made 
considerable attempt in this direction. Also, it 
was established that by working with his 
father he had a good base of operations from 
which to look for work. Also, no money was 
received by the claimant during the period 13 
September to 1 1 February 1960. (In this regard 
it was admitted that the claimant was living 
at home but paid no board, although formerly 
he had paid board in the amount of $10 a 
week). Also, that the claimant was at all times 
available for work not only daily but hourly. 
It was also established that if the claimant 
had not been working for his father, his father 
would not have employed anybody else and 
paid a remuneration for the work. The Board 
has accepted all these facts but cannot get 
away or rather depart from the principles laid 
down by the Umpire in many decisions cover- 
ing such cases. We will quote, in brief, a few. 
CUB 793 — "That the claimant who took an 
active part in the operation of a 
boys' clothing store, allegedly owned 
by his wife and brother, had not 
proved that he was unemployed 
within the meaning of the Act inas- 
much as he worked during normal 
working hours and therefore fol- 
lowed an occupation for which it is 
customary to receive remuneration." 
CUB 758— 1— "That the apparent lack of 
remuneration in the case of a 
claimant who follows an occupa- 
tion which is ordinarily remun- 
erated does not necessarily lead 
to the conclusion that he is 
unemployed within the meaning 
of the Act. 
2 — "That the fact of being available 
for work is not conclusive evid- 
ence of unemployment." 



64 



THB LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



Other decisions quoted in the submission, 
namely CUB 1592, CUB 1515, CUB 1404, CUB 
1146 all uphold the same principle. 

The solicitor for the claimant did quote 
several Umpire's decisions on which he based 
his appeal — that the claimant was actually per- 
forming a work of benevolence to the family, 
amongst which was one decision, CUB 442. 

However, the board in weighing the evidence 
and arguments have concluded that the weight 
of the argument in the first mentioned Umpire's 
decision far outweigh the argument regarding 
the benevolent gesture because it feels, accord- 
ing to the evidence, that the work the claimant 
performed and time put in constituted more 
than a benevolent gesture. The appeal is 
therefore disallowed and we confirm disqualifi- 
cation, indefinitely, as from 13 September 1959 
under Section 54 (1) of the Unemployment 
Insurance Act and Unemployment Insurance 
Regulation 154 (1). 

With the permission of the chairman of 
the board of referees the claimant, through 
his lawyer, appealed to the Umpire on the 
following grounds: 

The Board of Referees having accepted the 
following facts, namely, that the Claimant 
genuinely tried to find work (CUB 1085, 
1154, 1246, 1254, 1327, 1338), that he left 
himself in a good place to find work and also 
made a considerable attempt to find work 
(CUB 756), that no money was received by 
the Claimant and that he was available for 
work, not only daily, but hourly (CUB 916), 
and that his father would have hired no one 
to replace him if he left. 

Further, it was adduced in evidence that 
the father had no control over the times or 
days the Claimant attended his premises and 
indeed he came and went as he pleased at and 
on his own time. Under the above circum- 
stances, the Claimant herein points out that 
CUB 793 should be distinguished as differing 
from this case as in that instance the Claimant 
did not prove his availability for work whereas 
as in this case that fact has been accepted. 

Further, CUB 758 states a maximum upon 
which the Claimant is not necessarily relying 
and points out that the lack of remuneration 
may not lead to the conclusion of unemploy- 
ment, that lack of remuneration plus the other 
factors having been established, namely, an 
honest and considerable attempt to find work, 
a placing of the Claimant in a position where 
he would be most likely to find work and the 
desire and availability to take work almost 
immediately can and may lead to the con- 
clusion of unemployment, which is the con- 
tention of the Claimant. 

Further, the Claimant submits that the reason- 
ing in CUB 442 should be applied. In that 
case the activities of the Claimant were judged 
"as acts of benevolence" which might be 
expected of any married man — why cannot the 
acts between father and son be judged to be 
benevolence as well? 

Further, the Claimant quotes CUB 514. 
Here again, the husband was helping his wife 
full time. The Umpire decided that the case had 
elements of "good faith" and allowed the 
"benefit of the doubt". Can not the same be 
applied here? There seems to be ample evidence 
of good faith and honest desire to find employ- 
ment in this instance. 

In summary then, the Claimant asks for the 
"benefit of the doubt". As previously pointed 
out, useful activity is preferable to idleness and 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 

91211-3—5 



it does not seem to be the intention of the 
Act to enforce idleness upon Claimants. The 
Claimant honestly tried to find work but also 
tried to be useful to his family in his spare 
time. Surely this type of activity of the unem- 
ployed should not be condemned. 

In a memorandum dated July 26, 1960, 
for the attention of the Regional Claims 
Officer, the enforcement officed stated: 

. . . The premises of . . . are located at the 
corner of . . . Street and . . . Drive, in the City 
of Vancouver. The Body Shop is located at 
the rear of the Service Station, Either address — 
... or . . . — could be used. This auto body 
shop was in operation during the period that 
[the father] owned the Garage portion. He 
sold the front portion of the garage and 
retained the Body Shop in the rear. The oper- 
ation of the Body Shop was, therefore, a 
continuous operation . . . 

Considerations and Conclusions: The rec- 
ord shows that the claimant received free 
room and board at his home on the condi- 
tion that he would "help out" in his father's 
shop, that he would look after the books 
and act as a general handyman. In fact, he 
stated "... I do not have to pay room and 
board at home so long as I help out at 
the shop." This, in itself, constitutes evidence 
that a contract of service existed between 
the claimant and his father. 

The record shows also that although the 
claimant had no fixed hours of work, it is 
noted that his daily time of arriving at 
the shop was between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. 
where he remained until 5 p.m. He did this 
six days a week except when he was looking 
for other work. In view thereof, he can be 
said to have been employed in employment 
in which he was in the position of controlling 
his working hours and, therefore, his case 
must be decided in accordance with the 
provisions of subsections (1) and (2) of 
Regulation 154, that is, the claimant shall 
not be considered as unemployed during 
any period in respect of which he remained 
employed by his father unless such employ- 
ment was "so minor in extent that a person 
would not, under the circumstances, norm- 
ally follow it as a principal means of 
livelihood." 

I find that in examining this case the 
insurance officer, the board of referees and 
the claimant have relied on the jurisprudence 
established in relation to obsolete provisions 
of the Act and the Regulations. Such a 
practice is not without danger, as can be 
seen by the importance that was unduly 
attached to the question of the claimant's 
availability for other work. 

However, the test of availability for an 
additional full-time employment "in a par- 
ticular week", a test which seems to have 
been the basis of the old Regulation 158 (4), 
no longer exists as a condition of an insured 

( Continued on page 72) 



65 



LABOUR CONDITIONS IN FEDERAL 
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS 



Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during November 
Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During November the Department of Labour prepared 319 wage schedules for 
inclusion in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Government 
and its Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, 
remodelling, repair or demolition. In the same period, a total of 172 contracts in these 
categories was awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to trade 
unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of the 
contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under the heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practice; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
ace, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
o alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in November for the manufacture of supplies and equipment were 
as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

CMHC 2 $ 10,488.00 

Defence Production 107 421,895.00 

Post Office 4 111,062.60 

RCMP 3 11,918.90 



The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour These wage schedules are thereupon in- 
legislation of the federal Govenunent has eluded with other relevant labour condi- 
the purpose of insuring that all Government tions as terms of such contracts to be 
contracts for works of construction and for observed by the contractors, 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment Wage schedules are not included in con- 
contain provisions to secure the payment of tracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
wages generally accepted as fair and reason- equipment because it is not possible to 
able in each trade or classification employed determine in advance the classifications to 
in the district where the work is being per- be employed in the execution of a contract, 
formed. A statement of the labour conditions which 

The practice of Government departments must be observed in every such contract 

and those Crown corporations to which the is however, included therein and is of the 

legislation applies, before entering into con- same nature and effect as those which apply 

tracts for any work of construction, re- in works of construction, 
modelling, repair or demolition, is to obtain Copies of the federal Government's Fair 

wage schedules from the Department of Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 

Labour showing the applicable wage rate may be had upon request to the Industrial 

for each classification of workmen deemed Relations Branch of the Department of 

to be required in the execution of the work. Labour, Ottawa. 



66 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equip- 
ment provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate; but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

(b) the working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, 
or if there be no such custom, then fair and reasonable hours; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made during November 

During November the sum of $4,355.42 was collected from 10 contractors for wage 
arrears due their employees arising out of the failure of the contractors, or their sub- 
contractors, to apply the wage rates and other conditions of employment required by the 
schedule of labour conditions forming part of their contract. This amount is for distribution 
to the 184 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded during November 

(The labour conditions of the contracts marked (*) contain the General Fair Wages 
Clause providing for the observance of current or fair and reasonable rates of wages and 
hours of labour not in excess of eight per day and 44 per week, and also empower the 
Minister of Labour to deal with any question which may arise with regard thereto.) 

Department of Agriculture 

Lennoxville Que: Eugene Marcoux, construction of three barns, Dairy Cattle Centre, 
Experimental Farm. Outlook Sask: Piggott Construction Ltd, construction of twelve relief 
wells & drainage conduit — Stage 1, South Saskatchewan River Dam. Lethbridge Alta: 
Getkate Masonry Construction Ltd, construction of poultry house, sewage disposal system & 
foundation for residence. Animal Pathology Laboratory. Summerland B C: Colin A 
Campbell, construction of barn, Research Station. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Chalk River Ont: Lindsay Scharfe, * application of built-up asphalt & gravel roof for 
Bldg 234; C J Lehman & Sons Ltd, * supply & installation of terra cotta tile & brick for 
change room of Bldg 150. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Fredericton N B: Anric Engineering Co, repairs to basement walls & landscaping 
for 32 housing units (VR 3/48). Montreal Que: Giovanni Di Filippo, *snow removal, 
Benny Farm; Bub-L-Bath Car Wash Ltd, *snow removal, Domaine des Prairies. Camp 
Borden Ont: Konvey Construction Co, construction of stage 4 extension & gymnasium 
to stage 3 school (DND 16/60). Pembroke Ont: B G Wall & Co Ltd, *renovation to 
windows & installation of storm sash (1/54). Petawawa Ont: Conniston Construction Co 
Ltd, site improvement for high school (DND 15/58). Victoria B C: Kasapi Construction 
Co Ltd, *repairs to house, 1732 Amphion St (Project 6-6A). 

Department of Citizenship and immigration 

St John River Agency N B: Donald Wort, additions & alterations to Woodstock Indian 
day schools. Yukon Indian Agency Y T: K Moore & Co Ltd, installation of dishwashing 
unit, Carcross IRS. 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 

Greenwood N S: Rodney Contractors Ltd, construction of PC bldg & services, RCAF 
Station. Halifax N S: C F Cox Ltd, re-roofing of Gladstone St Stores Bldg. Shirley Bay 
Ont: Roseboro Construction & Equipment Ltd, construction of guard house, Defence 
Research Board. Trenton Ont: Spiers Bros Ltd, construction of bulk petroleum storage & 
handling facilities, RCAF Station. Cold Lake Alta: Frazer & Rice Construction Ltd, 
extension to garage, RCAF Station. Comox B C: Gilmour Construction & Engineering Co 
Ltd, exension of concrete parking area, RCAF Station. Victoria B C: Hume & Rumble 
Ltd, renovations to electrical distribution system, Work Point Barracks. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 196 1 67 

91211-3— 6i 



Building and Maintenance 

Dartmouth N S: Northern Roofing & Metal Workers Ltd, renewal of roofing & 
flashings of hangars Nos 3 & 4 & bldg No 4, RCN Air Station, Shearwater. Barriefield Ont: 
J H McFarland Construction Co Ltd, additions & alterations to sewage system. Trenton 
Ont: H J Gascoigne Ltd, re-roofing of bldgs 21, 23, 32, 58 & hangars 1, 4 & 8, RCAF 
Station. Uplands Ont: Bedard-Girard Ltd, additional street lighting, RCAF Station. 

Department of Defence Production 

Torbay Nfld: Ozark Electrical Co Ltd, replacement of voltage regulators & inspection 
of diesel unit at Parker's Pond installation, RCAF Station. Summerside P E I: Curran 
& Briggs Ltd, paving of various parking lots, RCAF Station; Maritime Asphalt Products, 
replacement of hardwood flooring in Officers' Mess & laying of rubber tile in Airmen's 
Canteen, RCAF Station. Dartmouth N S: James F Lahey Ltd, interior painting with 
fire retardent paint of Hangar "C", HMCS Shearwater. Halifax N S: Standard Paving 
Maritime Ltd, asphalt paving of Areas B & C, HMC Dockyard; Standard Paving Maritime 
Ltd, asphalt paving of Area A near Quay Wall E, HMC Dockyard. Chatham N B: Byron H 
MacDonald, interior painting of Hangar No 4, RCAF Station. Farnham Que: Jean Paul 
Lasnier, installation of concrete slabs for Cadet Camp area. Granby Que: Fernand Fortin 
Inc, installation of steam heating system at Armoury. Valcartier Que: J O Lambert Inc, 
asbestos shingle & asphalt roofing, No 20 Works Coy, RCE Camp. Barriefield Ont: Bemac 
Protective Coatings Ltd, installation of mastic asphalt surfacing in distribution area & in 
two storage wings, RCEME School. Cornwall Ont: Riddell Bros Co Ltd, plaster repairs & 
repainting Armoury. Downsview Ont: Terrazzo, Mosaic & Tile Co Ltd, repairing & 
refinishing of terrazzo surfaces at Defence Research Medical Laboratories, 1130 Sheppard 
Ave W. Hagersville Ont: Carmichael Roofing & Insulating Co Ltd, re-roofing of hangar 
No 3, Military Camp. Niagara Falls Ont: Warren Bituminous Paving Co Ltd, construction 
of vehicle parking lot, etc, Victoria Ave Armoury. Ottawa Ont: Dibblee Construction Co 
Ltd, construction of gravel road & culverts, Leitrim Wireless Station. Fort Churchill Man: 
Trevi-Tile Co, removal of existing floor & base & replacing with terrazzo-type flooring, 
men's mess kitchen, Bldg F16. Moose Jaw Sask: Bird Construction Co Ltd, removal of 
window sash & frames & replacing with new windows. Armoury. Lancaster Park Alta: 
P W Graham & Sons Ltd, installation of "Multiflex" door in north wall of Bldg No 187, 
MSE Garage, RCAF Station, Namao. Esquimalt B C: Farmer Construction Ltd, connecting 
steam distribution lines & domestic hot water supply from bldg No 28 to bldg No 54, 
HMCS Naden. 

Department of Fisiieries 

Halifax N S: Halifax Shipyards, *construction of steel patrol vessel. Vancouver B C: 
Bel-Aire Shipyard Ltd, * construction of wooden patrol vessel. 

Department of Justice 

St Vincent de Paul Que: Roger Electric Inc, installation of electrical equipment in 
Substation, St Vincent de Paul Penitentiary. 

National Harbours Board 

Montreal Que: Charles Duranceau Ltee, construction of main overpass, Section 2, 
Ohamplain Bridge; Louis Donolo Inc, construction of pile foundations, Elevator No 4. 
Three Rivers Que: Rosaire Dufresne Inc, construction of transit shed No 9. 

Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources 

Baker Lake N W T: Argon Welding Industries Ltd, supply & installation of fuel oil 
storage tank & distribution system. 

Department of Public Works 

Burgeo Nfld: Towne & Country Construction Co Ltd, wharf reconstruction. Chester 
Ironbound N S: Continental Construction Co Ltd, breakwater reconstruction. Guysborough 
N S: Campbell & Grant Construction Co Ltd, breakwater improvements. Reserve Mines 
N S: M R Chappell Ltd, construction of post office. Batiscan Que: Marautier Construction 
Inc, repairs to protection walls. Berthier-en-Bas Que: Les Entreprises Cap Diamant Ltee, 
construction of protection works. Bridgeville Que: Chandler Construction Ltd, repairs to 

68 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



wharf & breakwater. Cedarville Que: Goudreau Construction Enrg, construction of wharf. 
Chicoudmi North Que: Georges Riverin & Fils Enr, reconstruction of stone wall. Clermont 
Que: Edgar Fournier & Gerard Neron, construction of post office. Contrecoeur Que: Gordon 
Wells, repairs to retaining wall. Havre ciux Maisons, I M Que: La Cie de Construction 
Arseneau, construction of landing extension. L'lsletville Que: Paul Malenfant, construction 
of post office. Matane Que: Georges Tremblay, construction of retaining wall. Nouvelle 
Que: Ouellon Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Riviere Quelle Que: Pohenega- 
mook Construction Ltd, wharf repairs. St Basile de Portneuf Que: Theriault & Beland Inc, 
construction of post office. Ste Claire Que: Georges Chouinard, construction of post office. 
Sept lies Que: Nordbec Construction Inc, construction of houses for UIC & NA & NR. 
Val Brillant Que: Henri Audet, construction of post office. Bala Ont: B & J Fawcett, wharf 
repairs. Burgessville Ont: Butler-Ash Ltd, construction of post office. Carp Ont: Coady 
Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Courtright Ont: Concord Homes, construc- 
tion of post office. Jackson's Point Ont: Simcoe Dock & Dredging Ltd, repairs to South 
wharf. Mcintosh Ont: A K Penner & Sons Ltd, construction of two staff units, IRS. Ottawa 
Ont: A Lanctot Construction Co Ltd, construction of oil storage tank farm bldg & 
addition, alterations & repairs to Bldgs "H" & "J", 562 Booth St; Stanley G Brooks, 
supply & installation of fire alarm system. Royal Canadian Mint, Sussex Drive; Robert 
Strang, redecoration of certain rooms, Daly Bldg; Universal Electric, supply & installation 
of transformer & certain alterations, Central Heating Plant, Cliff St. Pendleton Ont: Dixon 
Van Lines Ltd, moving film cannisters & storage racks to Beaconsfield, Que. Port Rowan 
Ont: John L Wamsley, construction of retaining wall. South River Ont: Farquhar Con- 
struction Ltd, construction of post office. Wellington Ont: Frankford Builders Supplies, 
construction of post office. Zurich Ont: John B Erb, construction of post office. Crystal 
City Man: H J Martens, construction of post office. Wasagaming Man: Dauphin Fixtures 
Ltd, construction of RCMP detachment quarters. Canwood Sask: E D Senum, construction 
of post office. Kelliher Sask: Holterman Construction, construction of post office. Milden 
Sask: Wolfe Construction, construction of post office. Ponteix Sask: Swift Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of post office. Prelate Sask: Wolfe Construction, construction of 
post office. Redvers Sask: F A France Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office. 
Rockglen Sask: Inland Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Coronation Aha: 
Robert Holzer, construction federal bldg. Exshaw Alta: Borger Structures Ltd, construction 
of post office. Standard Alta: Borger Structures Ltd, construction of post office. Bralorne 
B C: Burdett Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office. Klemtu B C: Stange Con- 
struction Co Ltd, construction of addition to classroom & new staff residence, Indian day 
school. Penticton B C: Inland Paving Co Ltd, blacktop paving. Radio Astrophysical 
Observatory. Port Alberni B C: Greenlees Piledriving Co Ltd, wharf repairs, Argyle St. 
Prince Rupert B C: Northwest Construction Ltd, construction of new floor in laundry 
room & alterations to heating system in nurses' residence, Miller Bay Hospital. Salmo B C: 
Southwest Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office. Vancouver B C: Allan & Viner 
Construction Ltd, alterations to old Federal Bldg (second stage), for UIC. Yarrow B C: 
Triangle Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office. 

Contracts Containuig the General Fair Wages Clause 

Burin Nfld: Grandy's Carpenter Shop, general alterations, federal bldg. Sydney N S: 
McDonald & Robertson, installation of fire-alarm system, federal bldg. Drummondville 
Que: Benjamin Robidas, parapet wall repairs, Heriot Bldg. Lachine Que: Edgar Milet Inc, 
interior painting & plaster repairs, federal bldg. LaSarre Que: Alexandre Roberge, general 
repairs, federal bldg. Matane Que: Cie de Construction MFM Ltd, installation of lock 
boxes, post office. Quebec Que: M J Roland Seguin, interior repainting, the Citadel. 
Chapleau Ont: Charles W Collins Store Ltd, interior painting, federal bldg. London Ont: 
E R Taylor Construction Ltd, alterations to Prevost Bldg; Toten Construction Co Ltd, 
general alterations, Fisheries Research Board. Ottawa Ont: Fixit Household Services Ltd, 
roof repairs, Supreme Court Bldg; A Currie & Son, electrical repairs, British American 
Bank Note Bldg; Sanco Ltd, cleaning of walls, Victoria Museum; J Milton, supply & 
installation of exhaust fans, Citizenship & Immigration Bldg; Oak Construction Co Ltd, 
general alterations, 860 Bank St; R A Bingham & Son, general alterations, Jackson Bldg; 
Ontario Bldg Cleaning Co Ltd, cleaning & servicing unit heaters, various bldgs; Hurdman 
Bros Ltd, moving equipment to new location, Le Droit & Rovale Bldgs. Seaforth Ont: 
Hildebrand Paint & Wallpaper, interior painting, federal bldg. Stratford Ont: Pounder 
Bros, supply & installation of partitions, federal bldg. Tillsonburg Ont: Sinden's Ltd, 
interior painting, federal bldg. Steinback Man: Steinback Lumber Yards Ltd, installation of 
lock boxes, federal bldg. Winnipeg Man: Wyatt Construction Ltd, installation of screenline, 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 69 



Postal Station "B". near Chilliwack B C: North Western Dredging Co Ltd, dredging in 
Chilliwack River. Courtenay B C: Courtenay Decorators, general alterations, federal bldg. 
Douglas B C: Warren M Slaughther, general alterations. Customs & Immigration Bldg. New 
Westminster B C: Evans, Coleman & Evans Ltd, dredging in Eraser River at Government 
wharf & 8th St floats. Vancouver B C: Arvin Hanna, general alterations, Alvin Bldg. 
Williams Lake B C: G & L Carlson Construction Ltd, interior alterations, federal bldg. 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 

Lachine Que: Charles Duranceau Ltd, paving of bridge No 1, Lachine Canal, Eastern 
District. St Lambert & Cote Ste Catherine Que: Quebec Engineering Ltd, construction of 
entrance wall fenders, St Lambert & Cote Ste Catherine Locks — Eastern District. Cornwall 
Island Ont: Coleman Munro Ltd, construction of drain from municipal road to Customs 
area. Iroquois Ont: Glen Lawrence Construction Co Ltd, paving of road at Iroquois Lock 
Sightseeing Area. Port Dalhousie Ont: Bridge & Tank Co of Canada Ltd, erection of 
swing bridge (over Third Welland Canal). St Catherines Ont: Bridge & Tank Co of Canada 
Ltd, repair & modification of segmental & truck girders of rolling lift bridges across 
Welland Ship Canal, Western District; G M Gest Contractors Ltd, modification of mitre 
gate sills, Welland Canal, Western District; Bridge & Tank Co of Canada Ltd, repair of 
Bridge No 3 across Welland Canal; R E Law Crushed Stone Ltd, tack coating & asphalting 
of wearing surfaces of Bridges Nos 14 & 16, Welland Canal; Dominion Bridge Co Ltd, 
replacement of counterweight ropes. Bridge 21, Welland Canal; R E Law Crushed Stone 
Ltd, tack coating & paving of lift spans of Bridge 18, Welland Canal, Western District; 
Art Ellis Construction Co, construction of linesmen's bldgs, Locks 3 & 7, Welland Canal. 

Department of Transport 

Cape Race Nfld: Davis Construction Ltd, construction of single dwelling, garage & 
related works. St John's (Tor bay) Nfld: Rayner Construction Ltd, repairs to runways 
08-26 & 02-20 & ramp, Airport; E P Electric Products Co Ltd, extending H I lighting on 
Runway 17-35 & relocating approach lights. Halifax N S: Universal Electric, installation 
of street & car park lighting. International Airport; Diamond Construction (1955) Ltd, 
construction of transmitter bldg, remote receiver bldg, antenna tuning house & related 
work, Camperdown. Grindstone M I Que: Clarry Arseneau, construction of two single 
dwellings. Montreal Que: G M Gest Contractors Ltd, installation of street & car park 
lighting, Airport; Allied Building Services Ltd, cleaning of Air Terminal Bldg, Airport. 
Malton Ont: Marley Canadian Ltd, supply & installation of cooling towers for power 
plant, new Terminal complex, Toronto Airport; Dominion Bridge Co Ltd, supply & 
installation of boilers for power plant, new Terminal complex, Toronto Airport. Sault 
Ste Marie Ont: Arctic Units Ltd, fabrication & erection of temporary Air Terminal 
Bldgs; Towland Construction Ltd, construction of water supply lines & associated work, 
Airport. Toronto Ont: Walter Young Machinery & Equipment Co Ltd, * construction of 
sectional steel scow. Windsor Ont: Windsor Janitorial Service Co, cleaning of Air Terminal 
Bldg; Accurate Electrical Contractors, installation of MI lighting, Runway 02-30. Flin Flon 
Man: Tallman Construction Co Ltd, & Simkin's Construction Co Ltd, clearing, stumping, 
grubbing & construction of paved runway, aircraft parking apron, drainage, lighting & 
diversion of Provincial Trunk Highway No 10. North Battle ford Sask: Del Frari Con- 
struction, construction of single dwelling. Airport. Regina Sask: Smith Bros & Wilson Ltd, 
construction of remote receiver bldg. Airport. Peace River Alta: Lahey Construction Ltd, 
construction of non-directional beacon & related work. Fort St John B C: McWilliams & 
Brown Enterprises Ltd, construction of ILS Runway 29 including various bldgs & related 
work. Prince Rupert B C: Greenall Bros Ltd, construction of various bldgs & related works; 
Greenall Bros Ltd, prefabrication & erection of temporary Air Terminal bldgs. Williams 
Lake B C: K Moore & Co Ltd, installation of rotating beacon, Airport. 



70 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



PRICES AND THE COST OF LIVING 



Consumer Price Index, December 1960 

Canada's consumer price index (1949 = 
100) remained unchanged at 129.6 between 
November and December 1960. A year ago 
the index stood at 127.9*. During the year 
the index averaged 128.0, which was 1.2 
per cent above the 1959 average level of 
126.5. 

The food index declined 0.2 per cent; 
the household operation and "other" com- 
modities and services indexes were un- 
changed. The shelter and clothing indexes 
were up 0.1 per cent. 

The food index decreased from 125.5 to 
125.3 as egg prices declined 6 cents a dozen 
to 62 cents and lower prices were reported 
for most cuts of beef and veal, lettuce, 
grapefruit and a number of domestically 
grown vegetables. Price increases occurred 
for a number of items including oranges, 
apples, fresh tomatoes, pork and chicken. 

The shelter index advanced from 144.5 
to 144.6. The rent component was un- 
changed for the third successive month, but 
price increases occurred for several items 
of home ownership. 



*See Table F-1 at back of book. 



The clothing index increased from 112.5 
to 112.6; more expensive were men's shirts, 
hats and over-alls; children's wear was 
somewhat higher. Prices for women's cloth- 
ing were slightly lower as fur coat prices 
decreased. Footwear prices were unchanged, 
with higher prices for men's work boots 
balancing lower prices for women's over- 
shoes. Prices of piece goods showed no 
change. 

The household operation index was un- 
changed at 123.5 for the third successive 
month, with price decreases for fuel oil 
offsetting minor price increases for some 
items of furniture, floor coverings, house- 
hold supplies, utensils and equipment, and 
services. 

The "other" commodities and services 
index was unchanged at 138.3, and reflected 
changes limited to higher prices for toilet 
soap and lower prices for gasoline and 
bicycles. 

Group indexes in December 1959 were: 
food 122.4, shelter 142.7, clothing 111.4, 
household operation 123.7, and "other" com- 
modities and services 136.9. 



CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 



Index 1949=11 



Index 1949=100 



1 ' 

j 
1 
j 
















1 
























SHELTER 


.^ 








1 
1 




i 
1 




^ 


,.• 


TflTAI 


_^......<" 








^^ 






OTHER CO 
ANOSE 


^MOOITIES 
RVICES ...- 


^ 


'^^-'— A 


^^ 




N^ '" 


«A-..r,«''7\ / 


\t^ 






/^^ 


^,.,.-,.- 


2_'^--'^- 




;^ 


7 i\X * 

FOOO 

1 





[v,^ 




^ 


..-^ 


^^•••••^ .--•-- 





1 






J". y■^ 


U--z_^ 


>: 


4 


r/ 






^--r-/T^- 


CLOTHIN[ 


K^ 




HOUSEHOLD OPERATION 


1 1 

i 




1 






1 


• i 1 
1 ' 1 . 


nh.inln 


ninhilu 


iilninlii 



150 



140 



130 



120 



110 



100 



90 



150 



140 



130 



120 



110 



100 



90 



1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 
Yearly Average Monthly indexes 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 71 



City Consumer Price Indexes, November 1960 

Consumer price indexes (1949=100) rose 
in six of the ten regional cities between 
October and November 1960.t Increases 
ranged from 0.1 per cent in Edmonton- 
Calgary to 0.8 per cent in St. John's. Indexes 
were unchanged in Saint John and Ottawa 
and declined 0.2 per cent in both Toronto 
and Saskatoon-Regina. 

Food indexes declined in seven of the 
ten regional cities and increased in the 
other three cities. Shelter indexes increased 
in five cities, were unchanged in four cities 
and declined fractionally in the remaining 
city. Clothing indexes moved up in eight 
cities and were unchanged in two. House- 
hold operation indexes showed mixed re- 
sults: five city indexes declined, four in- 
creased and one remained unchanged. Other 
commodities and services indexes were 
higher in all ten regional cities. 

Regional consumer price index point 
changes between October and November 
were as follows: St. John's +0.9 to 115.9*; 
Montreal +0.6 to 129.7; Winnipeg +0.6 



to 127.7; Halifax +0.3 to 128.4; Vancouver 
+0.3 to 130.8; Edmonton-Calgary +0.1 
to 125.7; Toronto —0.2 to 131.9; Saskatoon- 
Regina —0.2 to 125.5. Saint John and 
Ottawa remained unchanged at 130.0 and 
130.2 respectively. 

U.S. Consumer Price Index, November 1960 

The United States consumer price index 
(1947-49=100) rose between mid-October 
and mid-November for the 16th time in 
the past 20 months. It increased from 127.3 
to 127.4, another record. 

The principal factors in the month's 
advance were an unusual increase in food 
prices and the usual increase in prices for 
services. It was the first time food prices 
had risen in November since 1951. 

U.K. Index of Retail Prices, October 1960 

The United Kingdom index of retail prices 
(Jan. 17, 1956=100) rose almost a full 
point to a new high between mid-September 
and mid-October, climbing from 110.5 to 
111.4. In October 1959 it was 109.2. 



Recent Regulations 

(Continued from page 60) 

The regulations now provide that before 
a new operator is put in charge of a passen- 
ger elevator he must have adequate exper- 
ience or training under the direction of a 
licensed operator or an instructor and a 
complete knowledge of instructions for 
elevator operation as set out in the appendix 
to the regulations. 



Railway Board of Adjustment 

{Continued from page 55) 

One paragraph of this article provided 
that trainmen in regular assigned freight 
service would be used to operate the first 
unassigned train out of any away-from-home 
terminal when their regular train was re- 
ported four hours late or was cancelled. 

The same paragraph, the company pointed 
out, also provided that if the train were 
reported four hours late another article 
of the agreement would apply with regard to 
payment for the time the crew was held 
away from home in excess of 16 hours. 



The company agreed that it was required 
to pay this penalty when a train was 
reported four hours late, but on each of 
the trips for which the union submitted a 
claim the trains had been well ahead of the 
four-hour limit, the company said. 

The Board did not sustain the employees' 
contention. 



tSee Table F-2 at back of book. 
*0n base June 1951=100. 



Decisions of Umpire 

{Continued from page 65) 

person's unemployed status under the new 
Regulation 154 (2), such status now depend- 
ing on the amount of time ("extent") that 
a person spends in "self-employment, busi- 
ness engagement or employment." 

As the record shows that the claimant in 
the present case was working at his father's 
shop six to eight hours a day, six days a 
week (in fact, he stated that "I spend all 
my time at these premises"), I consider that 
his employment was not "minor in extent" 
and that he must, therefore, be considered 
as not unemployed for the purpose of the 
Act and the Regulations during the period 
in question in the present appeal. 

For the above reasons, I decide to affirm 
the unanimous decision of the board of 
referees and to dismiss the claimant's appeal. 



72 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



Publications Recently Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not for 
sale by the Department of Labour. Persons 
wishing to purchase them should com- 
municate with the publishers. Publications 
listed may be borrowed by making applica- 
tion to the Librarian, Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. Students must apply 
through the library of their Institution. 
Applications for loans should give the 
number (numeral) of the publication de- 
sired and the month in which it was listed 
in the Labour Gazette. List No. 147. 

Annual Reports 

1. Great Britain. Factory Depart- 
ment. Annual Report of the Chief Inspector 
of Factories for the Year 1959. London, 
HMSO, 1960. Pp. 128. 

2. Great Britain. Factory Depart- 
ment. Annual Report of the Chief Inspector 
of Factories on Industrial Health, 1959. 
London, HMSO, 1960. Pp. 60. 

3. Great Britain. Ministry of Pensions 
and National Insurance. Report for the 
Year 1959. London, HMSO, 1960. Pp. 140. 

4. India. Ministry of Labour and Em- 
ployment. Office of the Chief Adviser, 
Factories. Annual Report for the Year 1959 
on the Working of the Indian Dock Labour- 
ers Act, 1934 and the Indian Dock 
Labourers Regulations, 1948. New Delhi, 
1960. Pp. 41. 

5. National Institute of Housework- 
ERS. Annual Report, 1959-60. London, 1960. 
Pp. 31. 

6. Quebec (Prov.). Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board. Thirty-second Annual 
Report, 1959. Quebec, 1960. Pp. 23. 

English and French. 

Automation 

7. Canadian Institute of Chartered 
Accountants. Integrated and Electronic 
Data Processing in Canada. Toronto, cl957. 
Pp. 56. 

Contents: What is Integrated Data Process- 
ing? Evaluating EDP Possibilities — a Program. 
A Review of Integrated Data Processing Equip- 
ment. A Review of Electronic Data Processing 
Equipment. Auditing Electronically Produced 
Records. Integrated Data Processing — A Case 
History. The Role of Communications in In- 
tegrated Data Processing. The Decision to 
"Go Electronic." 

8. European Productivity Agency. Low 
Cost Automation; Final Report. Project 
382/X. Paris, OEEC, 1960. 1 volume 
(various pagings). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

91211-3—6 



• JANUARY 796? 



" 'Low Cost Automation' can be defined as 
'a replacement of muscular and mental effort 
by the use of simple pneumatic, electric, hy- 
draulic and mechanical components in manu- 
facturing and assembly operations'." Describes 
a project which "was set up with the purpose 
of stimulating among small and medium-sized 
European manufacturers and their engineers 
and technicians a desire to apply advanced 
mechanization to their plants and to show them, 
step by step, how to do this." 

Canada at Work Broadcasts 

The following talks were presented under 
the auspices of, and published by, the 
federal Department of Labour in Ottawa in 
1960. 

9. Campbell, Ian. Age and Performance. 
Pp. 4. 

The speaker is National Co-ordinator of the 
Civilian Rehabilitation Branch of the federal 
Department of Labour and chairman of the 
Interdepartmental Committee on the Problem 
of the Older Worker. He affirms that workers 
over 40 are as productive as younger workers. 

10. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Know Canada better [by] Alan Field [and 
others] 4 Parts. 

Consists of four talks describing the various 
regions of Canada. The speakers were Alan 
Field, Director of the Canadian Government 
Travel Bureau; Gordon Hogarth, Acting De- 
puty Minister and Director, Division of Pub- 
licity, Ontario Department of Travel and 
Publicity; Dan Wallace, Director of the Nova 
Scotia Travel Bureau; and, David B. Turner, 
Deputy Minister of Recreation and Conservation 
for British Columbia. 

11. Field, F. F. Winter Employment 
and the National Housing Act. Pp. 4. 

The speaker is Director of Information of 
the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. 
He discusses how the Corporation helps to 
stimulate employment in the building trades 
in the winter. 

12. Harvey, James. Canada's Industrial 
Development Bank. Pp. 4. 

The speaker. Manager of the Industrial 
Development Bank of Canada, told how the 
Bank assists smaller Canadian industries to 
finance expansion. 

Disabled— Rehabilitation 

13. Taylor, Wallace W. Special Educa- 
tion of Physically Handicapped Children 
in Western Europe, by Wallace W. Taylor 
and Isabelle Wagner Taylor. New York, 
International Society for the Welfare of 
Cripples, 1960. Pp. 497. 

14. U.S. President's Committee on 
Employment of the Physically Handi- 
capped. Small Business speaks: Utilizing 
Handicapped Workers. Washington, GPO, 
1960. Pp. 19. 

73 



Portions of a panel discussion sponsored by 
the U.S. Small Business Administration and the 
President's Committee on Employment of the 
Physically Handicapped. Partial Contents: Selec- 
tion, Training, and Assignment. Promotion and 
Transfer. Supervision. Management's Relation- 
ship with Agencies serving the Handicapped. 

Economic Conditions 

15. Caves, Richard Earl. The Canadian 
Economy; Prospect and Retrospect, by 
Richard E. Caves and Richard H. Holton. 
Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1959. 
Pp. 676. 

Examines Canadian economic development 
up to the present and then estimates what the 
Canadian economy will be in 1970, taking into 
consideration such things as population, labour 
force, gross national product, personal con- 
sumption expenditures, investment expenditures, 
public finance, foreign trade, and primary 
manufacturing, and service industries. 

16. Great Britain. Central Statistical 
Office. National Income and Expenditure, 
1960. London, HMSO, 1960. Pp. 79. 

International Labour Organization 

17. International Labour Office. Gen- 
eral Report prepared [for the Coal Mines 
Committee'] First item on the agenda. 
Geneva, 1959. 2 parts. 

At head of title: Report 1, item 1 (a) and 
(b) [and 1 (c)] International Labour Organiza- 
tion. Coal Mines Committee. 7th sess., Geneva, 
1959. 

Contents: [1] Effect gvien to the Conclusions 
of the Previous Sessions. [2] Recent Events and 
Developments in the Coal Mining Industry. 

Supplementary Report [to Item 1 (a) and 
(b)]. 59 p. 

18. International Labour Office. La- 
hour Inspection in Road Transport. Third 
item on the agenda. Geneva, 1956. Pp. 174. 

At head of title: Report 3. International 
Labour Organization. Inland Transport Com- 
mittee, Hamburg, 1957. 

19. International Labour Office. La- 
bour-Management Relations in the Coal 
Mining Industry with Emphasis on the 
Human Aspects of Relations within the 
Enterprise. Third item on the agenda. 
Geneva, 1959. Pp. 95. 

At head of title: Report 3. International 
Labour Organization. Coal Mines Committee. 
7th sess., Geneva, 1959. 

20. International Labour Office. Me- 
thods of improving Organization of Work 
and Output in Ports. Second item on the 
agenda. Geneva, 1956. Pp. 196. 

At head of title: Report 2. International 
Labour Organization. Inland Transport Com- 
mittee, 6th sess., Hamburg, 1957. 

21. International Labour Office. Prin- 
ciples and Methods of Wage Determination 
in the Coal-Mining Industry. Second item 
on the agenda. Geneva, 1959. Pp. 84. 

At head of title: Report 2. International 
Labour Organization. Coal Mines Committee. 
7th sess., Geneva, 1959. 



Labour Laws and Legislation 

22. Illinois. University. Institute of 
Labor and Industrial Relations. Title 
VII: The Taft-Hartley Amendments, by 
R. W. Fleming. Urbana, 1960. Pp. 666-710. 

A discussion of Title VII, a section of the 
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure 
Act of 1959, which deals with "the problems 
of federal-state jurisdiction, economic strikers, 
boycotts, the hot-cargo contract, organization 
and recognition picketing, and special member- 
ship and pre-hire problems of the building and 
construction industry." 

23. U.S. Bureau of Labor Standards. 
State Laws regulating Private Employment 
Agencies. Washington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 124. 

Contains a "brief history of State laws 
regulating private employment agencies, a dis- 
cussion of the major provisions, and a State-by- 
State summary of the laws." 

Labour Organization 

24. Ghosh, Subratesh. Trade Unionism 
in the Under-Developed Countries. Calcutta, 
Bookland Private Limited, 1960. Pp. 410. 

A study of trade unions in South East Asia. 

25. Heaps, David. International Labor 
Bodies; a Summary of the Work and Pur- 
poses of the ICFTU, the International Trade 
Secretariats, and the ILO. New York, 
American Labor Education Service, cl960. 
Pp. 16. 

A brief outline of what is done by the Inter- 
national Confederation of Free Trade Unions, 
the International Trade Secretariats, and the 
International Labour Organization. 

26. International Union of Operating 
Engineering. Local No. 793. Annual Year 
Book, 1960. Toronto, 1960. Pp. 80. 

27. U.S. Bureau of Labor-Management 
Reports. Report, Fiscal Year, 1960. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 88. 

The Bureau of Labor-Management Reports 
was set up by the Labor-Management Reporting 
and Disclosure Act of 1959 to receive reports 
from labour unions on their financial operations 
and reports on other matters. 

Labour Supply 

28. Horowitz, Morris Aaron. Man- 
power Utilization in the Railroad Industry, 
an Analysis of Working Rules and Practices. 
Boston, Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research, Northeastern University, 1960. 
Pp. 68. 

A critical examination of working rules and 
practices in American railroads leads the author 
to suggest that some changes in the rules 
might improve output per manhour in the 
industry. 

29. Princeton University. Industrial 
Relations Section. The Scientist in Amer- 
ican Industry: Some Organizational Deter- 
minants in Manpower Utilization, by Simon 
Marcson. Princeton, 1960. Pp. 158. 



74 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



A study of the "organization of research in 
the central research laboratory of a large cor- 
poration that employs several hundred scien- 
tists." 

30. Ypsilantis, James N. The Labor 
Force of Czechoslovakia. Washington, GPO, 
1960. Pp. 30. 

Labouring Classes 

31. Gordon, Margaret S. Aging and 
Income Security. Berkeley, University of 
California, Institute of Industrial Relations, 
1960. Pp. 208-260. 

Discusses the economic status of the older 
citizen in the U.S. and the amount of security 
provided by private and public old age pensions. 

32. Illinois. University. Institute of 
Labor and Indutrial Relations. Cate- 
gories of Thought about Jobs and People 
in Industry, by Harry C. Triandis. Urbana, 
1960. Pp. 338-344. 

Describes results of a survey in a company 
in a rural New York State community. Mana- 
gers, clerks and workers were questioned about 
their present job, a previous job, and the job 
they would like if they didn't have their present 
job. 

33. National Trust Company Limited. 
A Study of Canadian Pension Plans. 
Toronto, cl960. 1 volume (unpaged). 

A survey of about 117 pension plans in 100 
companies. Provides the following information 
in columnar form: type of business; employee 
group covered by the plan; funding medium; 
eligibility; retirement age; employee contribu- 
tions; pension formula; termination; and, 
vesting, 

34. Rutgers University, New Bruns- 
wick, N.J. Institute of Management and 
Labor Relations. The Changing Woman 
Worker: a Study of the Female Labor Force 
in New Jersey and in the Nation from 
1940 to 1958, by Georgina M. Smith. New 
Brunswick, N.J., 1960. Pp. 23. 

35. U.S. Employment Service. Job 
Guide for Young Workers. 1960-61 ed. 
Washington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 72. 

36. Vaccara, Beatrice N. Employment 
and Output in Protected Manufacturing 
Industries. Washington, Brookings Institu- 
tion, 1960. Pp. 107. 

A short study of the employment implications 
of a reduction of import barriers in protected 
manufacturing industries. 

Migrant Labour 

37. U.S. Bureau of Labor Standards. 
State-Migratory Labor Committees, Their 
Organization and Programs. Washington, 
GPO, 1960. Pp. 75. 

38. U.S. President's Committee on 
Migratory Labor. Report to the President 
on Domestic Migratory Farm Labor. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 33. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 

91211-3— 6i 



39. Western Interstate Conference 
ON Migratory Labor, Phoenix, 1960. Pro- 
ceedings. [San Francisco, Council of State 
Governments, Western Office, 1960] Pp. 53. 

Conference held April 10-13, 1960. 
"Reproduced by the President's Committee 
on Migratory Labor." 

Unemployment 

40. Devino, William Stanley. Exhaus- 
tion of Unemployment Benefits during a 
Recession, a Case Study. East Lansing, 
Labor and Industrial Relations Center, 
Michigan State University, 1960. Pp. 78. 

A study, covering the period August 1957 
to August 1958, of unemployment insurance 
claimants in Lansing, Michigan who had ex- 
hausted their unemployment benefits. 

41. New Brunswick. Department of 
Labour. Seasonal Employment in New 
Brunswick. Fredericton, 1960. Pp. 35. 

Describes the program of the provincial 
government of New Brunswick to alleviate 
seasonal unemployment. 

42. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Impact on Workers and Community of a 
Plant Shutdown in a Depressed Area. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 58. 

"... A case history of a short period of time 
in the life of a community struggling to provide 
adequate job opportunities for its citizens." The 
community under study was Mt. Vernon, 111., 
where the largest industrial plant shut down. 

Wages and Hours 

43. Canada. Bureau of Statistics. Dis- 
tribution of Non-Farm Incomes in Canada 
by size, 1957. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1959. 
Pp. 40. 

44. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Economics and Research Branch. Employ- 
ment and Earnings in the Scientific and 
Technical Professions, 1959. Ottawa, 1960. 
Pp. 4. 

Miscellaneous 

45. Canada. Bureau of Statistics. Ill- 
ness and Health Care in Canada: Canadian 
Sickness Survey, 1950-51. [Prepared jointly 
by the Department of National Health and 
Welfare and the Dominion Bureau of Statis- 
tics] Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1960. Pp. 217. 

Contains material previously contained in 
the eleven parts of the Canadian Sickness 
Survey. 

46. Canada. Royal Canadian Navy. Sea- 
man's Handbook. Ottawa, 1960. Pp. 366. 

Contents: The Story of the RCN. Customs 
and Traditions. Discipline and Organization. 
The Sea. Ships and Aircraft. Ships Maintenance. 
Ropework. Rigging and Shipboard Work. Boat- 
work. ABCD (Atomic, Biological and Chemical 
Protection; and Damage Control) The Organ- 
ization of a Ship. Kit and Cleanliness. Advance- 
ment, Promotion, Documents and Pay. On 
being a Seaman. 

75 



47. Illinois. University. Institute of 
Labor and Industrial Relations. Manage- 
ment and Union Rights in Industrial Estab- 
lishments, by Milton Berber. Urbana, 1960. 
Pp. 3-11. 

An examination of "What rights unions 
and managements should exercise in the oper- 
ation of an enterprise." 

48. National Conference of Head 
State Supervisors [of] Vocational Educa- 
tion in Agriculture, Washington, B.C., 
1960. Summaries of Committee Reports. 
Techniques for improving Administration 
and Supervision in Vocational Agricuture, 
Washington, D.C., May 16-27, 1960. Wash- 
ington, U.S. Office of Education, Bivision of 
Vocational Education, 1960. Pp. 98. 

49. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Problem-Solving Conferences: How 
to plan them; How to lead them; How to 
make them work, by George V. Moser. New 
York, 1960. Pp. 56. 

Discusses the following: 1. what is meant 
by "conference"; 2. criteria for judging the 



conference problem; 3. how to prepare for the 
conference; 4. Four phases of a conference 
(a. Presentation of the problem; b. Discussion; 
c. Evaluation of ideas; d. Summary or conclu- 
sion); 5. Conference leadership; 6. Size of 
conference; and, 7. The conference member. 

50. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Use of Motivation Research in Mar- 
keting, by Lawrence C. Lockley. New York, 
1960. Pp. 27. 

"Motivation research, as it is applied to 
marketing research, can be summed up as the 
attempt to comprehend and forecast consumers' 
buying motives and buying decisions by the 
use of techniques that try to penetrate below 
the level of the conscious mind and uncover 
motives of which consumers are not themselves 
aware or tend to conceal." This study describes 
motivation research techniques, evaluates them, 
and suggests where and how they can be used 
to greatest advantage. 

51. U.S. Bureau of Veterans' Reem- 
ployment Rights. Reemployment Rights 
Handbook; Questions and Answers about 
Veterans' Reemployment Rights. Rev. ed. 
May 1958. Washington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 
138. 



Third-Quarter Imports in 1960 Down from Preceding Year 



Commodity imports into Canada during 
the third quarter of 1960 amounted to 
$1,295,900,000, the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics reported last month. Imports in 
the quarter continued the downward trend 
shown in the second quarter and were 4.3 
per cent below the total of $1,354,400,000 
for the July-September period of 1959. 

The nine-month total was $4,101,500,000, 
a fractional decrease of 0.2 per cent from 
the total during the same nine-month period 
in 1959. When compared with 1959, an 
increase in the first quarter was offset by 
the declines in the second and third quarters. 
The average price of imports rose slightly 
in the second and third quarters; therefore 
the volume of imports declined somewhat 
more than their value. 

In the third quarter, most import com- 
modities showed decreases compared with 
the same period of 1959. In particular, farm 
implements and machinery decreased from 
$67.7 million to $45.9 million, automobiles 
from $50.7 million to $40.6 million, auto- 
mobile parts from $52.1 million to $47.3 
million, electrical apparatus from $76.6 
million to $63.5 million, and rolling mill 
products from $32.9 million to $27.4 million. 

Crude petroleum imports jumped from 
$68.4 million to $80.5 million. Imports of 
aircraft and paper also rose in the third 
quarter. 



In the first nine months of 1960, imports 
of about half of the main commodities were 
higher than in the same period of 1959, 
mainly owing to large arrivals in the first 
quarter. Automobiles, cotton products, air- 
craft, vegetables and paper increased con- 
siderably but farm implements and machin- 
ery, petroleum products and unmanufactured 
wood fell off appreciably. 



Canadian Air Line, Telegraphers 
Set Up Board of Adjustment 

A board of adjustment has been set up 
for the disposition of disputes between 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Ltd., and the 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers, represent- 
ing dispatchers and traffic employees. 

The agreement covering the appointment 
of the board provides that the board shall 
consist of six members, three to be chosen 
by the company and three by the union. 

The following have been appointed to 
the board: Chairman — J. A. Cusack, Vice- 
President, Order of Railroad Telegraphers; 
Vice-Chairman — J. K. Dakin, Director of 
Industrial Relations, Canadian Pacific Air 
Lines, Ltd.; Members — ^W. V. Riley and 
W. A. Chambers for the company; and 
R. C. Smith and W. E. Nordick for the 
union. 



76 



THE LABOUn GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



Page 

Tables A-1 to A-4— Labour Force 77 

Table B-1— Labour Income 79 

Tables G-1 to C-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 80 

Tables D-1 to D-6— Employment Service Statistics 85 

Tables E-1 to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance 91 

Tables F-1 and F-2— Prices 93 

Tables G-1 to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts 94 

Tables H-1 and H-2— Industrial Fatalities 96 



A — ^Labour Force 

TABLE A-1— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED OCTOBER 15, 1960 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 





Canada 


Atlantic 
Region 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Region 


British 
Columbia 


The Labour Force 


6,499 

4,776 
1,723 

632 

803 

2,977 

1,857 

230 

6.131 

4,470 
1,661 

695 
5,436 

4,988 

3,488 
1,500 

368 

306 
62 

5,363 

1,136 
4,227 


592 

451 
141 

68 
83 
244 
171 
26 

546 

409 
137 

62 

484 

438 

318 
120 

46 

600 

144 
456 


1.820 

1,349 
471 

215 

261 
832 
462 
60 

1,694 

1,243 
451 

142 
1,552 

1,413 

998 
415 

126 

106 
20 

1,543 

312 
1,231 


2,392 

1,709 
683 

202 

264 

1,123 

713 

90 

2,272 

1,611 
661 

180 
2,092 

1,937 

1,334 
603 

120 

98 
22 

1,782 

353 
1,429 


1,111 

831 
280 

106 
132 
499 
330 

44 

1,080 

808 
272 

280 
800 

747 

511 
236 

31 

23 

* 

917 

201 
716 


584 


Men 


436 




148 


14 — 19 years 


41 


20 — 24 years 


63 


25 — 44 years 


279 


45 — 64 years 


181 




20 




539 


Men 


399 


Women 


140 


Agricultural 


31 




508 


Paid Workers 


453 


Men 


327 


Women 


126 


Unemployed 


45 


Men 


37 








521 


Men 


126 




395 







Le33 than 10,000. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



77 



TABLE A-2— UNEMPLOYED 

(Estimatea in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



October 
1960 



September 
1960 



October 
1959 



Total Unemployed 

On Temporary layoff up to 30 days 
Without work and seeking work 

Seeking full-time work 

Seeking part-time work 

Seeking under 1 month 

Seeking 1 — 3 months 

Seeking 4 — 6 months 

Seeking more than 6 months. . . 



368 

21 
347 

332 
15 

120 
125 
53 

49 



327 



22 
305 



291 
14 



117 
44 
46 



251 



14 
237 



228 



• Less than 10,000. 



TABLE A-3— DESTINATION OF ALL IMMIGRANTS BY REGIONS 

Source: Immigration Branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration 



Period 


Atlantic 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairies 


B.C. 
Yukon 
N.W.T. 


Canada 
Total 


Males 


1953 Total 


4,049 
3,849 
3,067 
3,029 
5,092 
3,268 
2,163 
1,638 
1,695 


34,294 
28.419 
22,117 
31,396 
55,073 
28,443 
24,816 
19,295 
18,917 


90,120 
83,029 
57,563 
90,662 
147,097 
63,853 
55.976 
45,004 
43,784 


27,208 
26,638 
15,559 
17,957 
37,172 
15,756 
12,848 
10,432 
11,146 


13,197 
12,292 
11,640 
17,930 
37,730 
13,531 
11,125 
8,986 
8,301 


168,868 
154,227 
109,946 
164,8571 
282,164 
124,851 
106,928 
85,355 
83,843 


91,422 


1954 Total 


84,531 


1955 Total 


56,828 


1956 Total 


89,541 


1957 Total 


154,226 


1958 Total 


60,630 


1959 Total 


51,476 


1959 First 9 Months 

1960 First 9 Months 


42,079 
42,567 



(1) Total includes 3,883 whose destination is not specified. 



TABLE A-4— DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS ENTERING CANADA BY OCCUPATIONS 

Source: Immigration Branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration 











c 






a c 
Is 








2 





il 

Si 

It 


1 
O 


Hc3 


IJ 


1 

> 

1 


3 


2t3 

II 


11 

c o c 

03 « o 


1 




4) 

O 

is: 

I 


1953 Total 


10 021 


6,339 
6,775 


1 855 


3 185 


13,766 
11,974 


17,250 
10,920 
7,036 


879 


26,492 
25,699 
15,117 


10,380 
13,011 

7,687 


966 


91 133 


1954 Total 


9,983 


1,938 


2,735 


763 


578 


84,376 
57,987 


1955Total 


8,563 


5,775 


1,190 


2,146 


9.588 


514 


371 


1956Total 


10,339 


9,492 


2,255 


3,823 


13,800 


7,500 


1,649 


29,264 


12,482 
19 471 


435 


91,039 


1957 Total 


17,256 


16,829 


5,254 


6,559 


17,574 


10,838 


2,693 


54,376 


661 


151,511 


1958 Total .. . 


8 497 


6 745 


1 229 


2 229 


11 501 


5,071 
4,965 


513 


17,476 
12,792 


9,388 
8,940 


429 


63 078 


1959Total 


7,784 


5,459 


999 


2,107 


9,740 


371 


394 


53,551 


1959 First 9 Months . 


6,295 


4,555 


835 


1,756 


7,610 


4,098 


298 


10,877 


7,308 


311 


43,943 


1960 First 9 Months. 


6,578 


4,888 


1,062 


1,781 


6,634 


4.620 


602 


11,590 


6,291 


276 


44,322 



78 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



B — ^Labour Income 

Note: The estimates of labour income in this table have been revised in accordance with recent revisions to the 
National Accounts. Note particularly the use of annual totals instead of monthly averages, and the introduction of 
quarterly instead of monthly totals for some industries. Monthly and quarterly figures may not add to annual totals 
because of rounding. 

TABLE B-1— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Totals 


Quarterly Totals^ 




Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation, 

Storage 

and 

Communi- 

cation2 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
Utilities 


Trade 


Finance 

Services 
(includ- 
ing 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
Income 


Totals' 


1955— Total. . . . 
1956-Total.... 
1957— Total.... 
1958-Total.... 
1959— Total. . . . 

1959 — Oct. 


432 
498 
535 
526 
552 

47.0 
47.1 
46.1 

46.0 

46.7 
46.7 
44.7 
45.2 
46.8 
46.4 
46.7 
47.0 
45.9 


4,148 
4,586 
4,805 
4,745 
5,018 

434.0 
421.0 
419.9 

418.8 
418.8 
421.2 
422.9 
429.7 
434.8 
429.6 
430.3 
434.3 
429.6 


1,396 
1,560 
1,658 
1,664 
1,756 

150.7 
148.0 
142.5 

140.3 
141.3 
138.7 
145.0 
147.9 
150.7 
153.6 
152.9 
151.6 
150.0 


329 
371 
336 
271 
288 


925 
1,210 
1,316 
1,336 
1,463 


204 
239 
363 
285 
302 


1,870 
2,069 
2,263 
2,356 
2,527 


3,211 
3,546 
3,954 
4,334 
4,821 


538 
617 
673 
717 
770 


13,223 
14,890 
15,996 
16,434 
17,717 

1,545.2 


Nov 

Dec. . 


94.2 


371.4 


77.4 


661.0 


1,230.1 


197.3 


1,610.8 
1,482.1 


1960_Jan 














1,458.7 


Feb 

March... 


73.4 


296.5 


74.7 


634.7 


1,234.3 


204.4 


1,461.1 
1,462.6 


April 

May 














1,486.9 


71.7 


356.1 


77.7 


656.5 


1,297.1 


209.8 


1,532.6 
1,576.8 


July 

Aug 

Sept.*... 
Oct.t.... 














1,564.1 


88.4 


417.6t 


81.lt 


663. 7t 


l,300.6t 


213. 9t 


1,574.5 
1,603.9 














1,583.9 

















1 Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 

2 Includes post ofiice wages and salaries. 

' Figures in this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining columns 
of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. (See also headnote.) 
* Revised, 
t Preliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



C — ^Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-1 to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees— at October, 1960 em- 
ployers In the principal non-agrlciiltural industries reported a total employment of 3,878,824. Tables C-4 (every 
second month) and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat smaller number of Arms than Tables C-1 to C-3. 
They relate only to wage earners for whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-1 to C-3 
relate to salaried employees as well as to all wage earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-1— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
SotTRCE: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 





Industrial Composite 




Manufacturing 




Year and Month 


Index Numbers (1949 = 100)i 


Average 

Weekly 

Wages and 

Salaries 


Index Numbers (1949 = 100) 


Average 

Weekly 

Wages and 

Salaries 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
Payroll 


Average 

Weekly 

Wages and 

Salaries 


Employ- 
ment 


\%S 


Average 

Weekly 

Wages and 

Salaries 


Averages 

1955 


112.9 
120.7 
122.6 
117.9 
119.7 

124.4 
121.8 
118.1 

115.1 
114.6 
114.2 
114.8 
118.9 
122.8 
121.9 
123.1 
123.1 
121.4 


161.2 
182.0 
194.7 
194.1 

205.7 

127.3 
211.6 
200.0 

202.2 
202.0 

2ai.5 

204.1 
2C9.8 
217.7 
217.8 
219.0 
220.8 
218.2 


142.1 
150.0 
158.1 
163.9 
171.0 

173.8 

172.8 
168.6 

174.9 
175.4 
175.4 
176.9 
175.4 
176.1 
177.6 
176.8 
178.2 
178.4 


$ 

61. C5 
64.44 
67.93 
70.43 
73.47 

74.66 
74.23 
72.41 

75.13 
75.35 
75.37 
75.98 
75.36 
75.67 
76.28 
75.94 
76.56 
76.66 


109.8 
115.8 
115.8 
109.8 
111.1 

113.9 
110.6 
108.4 

108.6 
108.9 
109.0 
1C8.8 
110.6 
112.1 
110.2 
111.7 
111.6 
109.6 


159.5 
176.8 
185.3 
182.7 
193.3 

201.8 
195.3 
187.1 

194.4 
194.4 
195.5 
196.3 
198.1 
201.8 
198.4 
199.7 
201.6 
199.4 


144.4 
151.7 
159.1 
165.3 
172.5 

175.3 
174.8 
170.9 

177.2 
176.7 
177.5 
178.5 
176.9 
177.8 
177.8 
176.5 
178.2 
179.6 


63.48 


1956 


66.71 


1957 


69.94 


1958 


72.67 


1959 . ... 


75.84 


1959 

October 


77.06 




76.86 


December 


75.14 


1960 

January 


77. 9Q 




77.68 


March 


78.04 


Aoril . . 


78.48 


^■::::::::::::::::::::: 


77.80 


June 


78.16 


July 


78.18 


Aug 


77.62 


Sept.* 


78.37 


Oct.t 


78.95 







J Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service, (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and 
recreational service). 

Technical Note — A change has been made in the method of dating the statistics published in Tables C-1 to C-6 to 
conform with the usual practice of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. In the past, statistics for the last pay period in 
a month were labelled "pay period preceding" the first day of the following month. From now on, statistics for the last 
pay period in a month will be labelled for that month. Another change is that average hourly earnings formerly expressed 
in cents carried to one decimal place, are now published in dollars and cents. 

* Revised. 

t Preliminary. 



THe LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



TABLE C-^-AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 



Area 



Employment Index Numbers 



Sept. 
1960 



Aug. 
1960 



Sept. 
1959 



Average Weekly Wages and 
Salaries, in Dollars 



Sept. 
1960 



Aug. 
1960 



Sept. 
1959 



Provinces 

Newfoundland 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta (including Northwest Territories) 
British Columbia (including Yukon) 

Canada , 

Urban Areas 

St. John's 

Sydney 

Halifax 

Moncton 

Saint John 

Chicoutimi — Jonquiere 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 

Shawinigan Falls 

Three Rivers 

Drummondville 

Montreal 

Ottawa— Hull 

Kingston 

Peterborough 

Oshawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

St. Catharines 

Niagara 

Brantford 

Guelph 

Gait 

Kitchener 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

London 

Sarnia 

Windsor 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Ft. William— Pt. Arthur 

Winnipeg 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Victoria 



151.0 
143.8 
97.9 
108.0 
124.1 
121.8 
115.8 
134.2 
159.2 
119.0 

123.0 



143.8 
95.8 
117.8 
101.9 
107.3 
120.7 
112.6 
104.6 
109.9 
112.8 
78.2 
125.4 



112. 

93. 
165. 
131. 
111. 
111. 
113. 

79. 
122. 
119. 
124. 
147.7 

94.3 
128.0 
126.9 

76.4 
145.1 
115.9 
115.0 
136.4 
146.9 
191.8 
175.2 
115.1 
111.7 



149.2 
148.7 
98.9 
109.2 
123.7 
121.4 
116.9 
135.4 
162.6 
119.9 

135.1 



144.0 

90.2 
116.9 
102.5 
107.9 
123.5 
114.2 
104.2 
112.7 
114.8 

76.8 
124.7 
127.6 
116.2 

95.1 
126.9 
130.9 
111.8 
107.7 
114.7 

78.2 
121.6 
118.8 
122.8 
148.9 

95.6 
125.9 
129.4 

75.3 
145.1 
117.3 
115.5 
138.6 
148. 
193. 
177. 
116. 



.3 
.3 
.4 
.0 
111.0 



144.8 
145.5 
99.9 
106.2 
124.9 
125.6 
118.0 
137.9 
165.0 
122.9 

125.6 



152.5 

92.6 
116.3 
104.2 
100.1 
116.0 
115.1 
103.9 
105.9 
124.9 

78.4 
127.0 
130.2 
111.4 
102.3 
177.3 
134.3 
116.4 
116.9 
112.4 

91.4 
129.8 
116.2 
126.5 
141.8 

95.0 
126.2 
126.8 

80.9 
155.9 
114.8 
115.9 
135.4 
145.1 
198.8 
177.8 
121.0 
120.2 



69.36 
53.72 
63.36 
62.53 
73.82 
79.54 
72.81 
73.42 
78.16 
83.66 

76.57 



55.12 

77.48 
62.29 
60.41 
63.64 
95.70 
65.10 
63.97 
83.12 
72.84 
61.44 
75.36 
71.95 
74.90 
85.16 
90.15 
80.02 
85.06 
85.96 
76.38 
71.48 
71.20 
69.03 
71.96 
89.54 
68.93 
73.80 
99.61 
84.44 
95.49 
80.43 
69.30 
71.03 
68.73 
73.99 
74.26 
81.53 
74.33 



67.48 
53.06 
62.43 
62.44 
73.28 
78.93 
72.33 
72.80 
78.03 
82.48 

75.94 



55.36 

74.44 
62.69 
59.35 
63.06 
92.89 
64.08 
63.30 
83.04 
70.68 
61.10 
75.05 
71.30 
73.33 
84.41 
86.94 
79.54 
84.74 
85.09 
74.59 
70.38 
71.86 
69.00 
72.94 
89.04 
68.44 
73.33 
98.05 
84.00 
99.07 
79.24 
69.12 
70.50 
67.76 
73.01 
74.65 
81.59 
74.45 



63.45 
55.39 
61.28 
61.10 
71.19 
77.50 
71.24 
71.50 
76.07 
80.54 

74.30 



52.34 
75.13 
59.92 
58.16 
58.83 
86.42 
62.53 
59.91 
80.68 
68.67 
60.30 
73.13 



70.82 
83.13 
86.60 
77.36 
83.35 
84.30 
74.73 
70.04 
69.88 
67.44 
71.27 
85.99 
66.50 
70.99 
94.31 
87.97 
95.81 
75.71 
67.86 
67.95 
66.89 
71.13 
71.49 
79.22 
70.72 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



81 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SIJMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES AND SALARIES 



(1949 



= 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls D.B.S. 



Industry 


Employment Index 
Numbers 


Avera 
and Sa 


ge Weekly Wages 
laries, in Dollars 


Sept. 
1960 


19"f)" 


Sept. 
1959 


Sept. 
1960 


Aug. 
1960 


Sept. 
1959 


Mining 


125.1 

138.0 
73.4 
198.1 
287.3 


123.9 

140.5 

74.9 

201.6 

289.7 


125.8 

142.7 

74.0 

206.7 

246.9 


93.50 

95.70 
76.53 
102.32 
113.42 
112.07 
93.39 
73.95 
109.33 
84.38 

78.36 

85.08 
72.73 
66.68 
78.58 
52.29 
77.41 
66.44 
93.28 
82.10 
80.87 
52.83 
50.31 
63.05 
59.30 
59.32 
69.65 
48.87 
47.39 
49.67 
49.49 
68.93 
70.92 
67.13 
61.68 
93.30 

100.74 
75.00 
85.67 
89.68 
89.00 
89.82 
80.19 
77.81 
84.79 
86.61 

102.59 
91.44 
87.55 
89.77 
94.73 

100.70 
86.65 
79.93 
82.34 
90.66 
87.23 
85.56 
98.15 
85.33 
93.58 
84.01 
82.75 
74.88 
79.09 

116.74 

117.57 
91.46 
81.03 

102.18 
69.58 

84.41 

92.25 
72.61 
81.19 

53.16 

41.53 
47.20 

76.57 


92.62 

94.73 
75.84 
101.27 
112.28 
109.44 
93.92 
71.24 
110.46 
81.52 

77.62 

84.18 
72.12 
65.78 
77.33 
50.28 
76.09 
66.39 
92.46 
80.63 
80.24 
53.26 
51.09 
62.57 
58.43 
59.63 
69.02 
49.55 
47.77 
51.46 
49.17 
67.78 
69.41 
66.72 
60.68 
91.55 
98.31 
74.58 
84.54 
89.18 
84.42 
88.75 
79.42 
76.82 
84.84 
85.89 

103.14 
90.79 
89.27 
88.63 
93.11 

100.72 
85.27 
79.48 
83.30 
90.04 
84.87 
85.79 
97.72 
84.90 
92.14 
84.24 
81.41 
74.01 
76.76 

114.32 

115.13 
90.60 
80.09 

100.37 
69.83 

83.36 

90.56 
72.68 
80.78 

52.32 

40.73 
46.15 

75 94 


91 27 




93.37 


Gold 


74.46 


Other metal 


99.68 




107.29 


Uranium 


106 32 


Fuels 


91.7 
50.9 
267.3 
147.3 

111.5 

111.5 

111.5 

129.8 

138.6 

206.1 

105.7 

113.4 

105.6 

78.8 

102.5 

85.6 

93.0 

77.3 

67.7 

64.0 

83.6 

92.3 

92.3 

100.4 

74.9 

105.7 

107.0 

113.9 

84.1 

127.3 

128.9 

123.4 

124.5 

102.6 

53.5 

133.6 

98.6 

97.7 

89.3 

114.0 

117.5 

111.8 

115.5 

103.5 

244.5 

98.3 

100.6 

60.6 

119.7 

130.4 

146.7 

120.3 

153.5 

133.0 

103.7 

217.2 

144.2 

89.4 

151.5 

137.4 

140.4 

133.4 

116.6 

160.0 

133.1 

144.4 

139.5 
152.4 


88.9 
46.2 
272.9 
151.0 

111.7 

111.6 
111.7 
130.6 
140.8 
195.7 
108.4 
114.7 
105.6 
78.3 
101.9 
85.3 
93.0 
76.9 
67.8 
63.8 
83.5 
91.9 
91.3 
100.5 
74.4 
108.5 
111.1 
113.2 
87.4 
128.8 
131.2 
123.1 
123.5 
105.5 
63.5 
142.3 
99.3 
99.6 
89.5 
115.3 
121.2 
112.9 
114.4 
96.6 
239.8 
77.9 
90.7 
61.7 
119.4 
132.3 
150.7 
102.6 
156.5 
132.1 
105.2 
211.5 
147.0 
92.0 
153.6 
140.2 
143.2 
134.4 
117.0 
162.7 
132.1 

146.4 

140.7 
155.9 


93.6 
51.1 

276.4 
143.4 

115.3 

119.4 
111.8 
126.6 
144.5 
174.3 
lOS.O 
110.9 
110.6 
84.4 
110.5 
88.9 
94.6 
80.0 
72.6 
64.8 
83.2 
95.8 
95.6 
102.5 
80.2 
111.6 
114.3 
116.7 
89.5 
127.2 
128.0 
125.2 
123.3 
112.7 
75.6 
168.6 
103.6 
115.7 
101.3 
119.8 
124.9 
117.1 
121.0 
112.6 
252.6 
109.2 
109.8 
69.6 
127.1 
130.5 
148.7 
111.5 
145.1 
140.6 
114.6 
222.4 
152.3 
105.9 
154.1 
138.3 
140.3 
132.6 
120.0 
151.9 
132.0 

151.7 

149.1 
155.9 


91.98 


Coal 


72.81 


Oil and natural gas . . 


107 23 




80.46 


Manufacturing ... 


76 43 




82.97 


Non-durable goods 


70 54 




65.65 


Meat products 


79.17 


Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 


48.34 
73.61 


Bread and other bakery products 


66.17 




87.58 


Tobacco and tobacco products 


75.61 




80.78 




51.33 




49.19 




61.45 


Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 


57.25 




57.93 


Synthetic textiles and silk 


68.00 


Clothing (textile and fur) 


49.08 




48,25 


Women's clothing 


50.98 




47.09 


Wood products 


66.76 




68.59 


Furniture 


65.62 




58.64 


Paper products 


88.35 


Pulp and paper mills . 


94.46 




72.65 


Printing, publishing and allied industries 


83.82 




87.98 


Agricultural implements 


85.69 


Fabricated and structural' steel 


87.05 




79.57 


Heating and cooking appliances 


77.52 




85.22 


Machinery, industrial 


84.40 




100.60 


Sheet metal products 


88.23 




89.21 


Transportation equipment 


87.79 


Aircraft and parts 


89.92 




100.83 


Motor vehicles parts and accessories 


85.29 




79.40 


Shipbuilding and repairing 


79.85 




86.44 


Aluminum products 


82.70 


Brass and copper products 


83.23 




94.54 


Electrical apparatus and supplies 


82.41 




89.54 


Telecommunication equipment 


78.19 




80.57 




74.79 


Glass and glass products 


75.91 




110.73 


Petroleum refining 


111.66 


Chemical products 


87.74 


Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations 

Acids, alkalis and salts 


77.62 
98.79 




67.32 


Construction 


79.79 




86.75 


Highways, bridges and streets 


69.03 


Electric and motor transportation 


78.70 


Service 


147.1 

134.8 
115.6 

123.0 


151.0 

140.6 
115.9 

123.1 


144.6 

134.8 
114.8 

125.6 


50.42 


Hotels and restaurants 


39.86 




45.27 


Industrial composite 


74.30 



82 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 796 J 



Tables C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat smaller number of firms than Tables C-l to C-3. 
They relate only to wage-earners for whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-1 to 
C-3 relate to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners of the co-operative firms. 

TABLE C-i— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING BY PROVINCES 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) Source: Man-hours and Hourly Earnings (Dominion Bureau of Statistics) 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 





Average Hours Worked 


Average Hourly Earnings 
(in cents) 




September 
1960 


August 
1960 


September 
1959 


September 
1960 


August 
1960 


September 
1959 


Newfoundland . .... 


38.5 
40.8 
41.6 
41.8 
40.9 
40.1 
38.6 
39.1 
37.8 


37.0 
40.4 
41.9 
41.7 
40.6 
39.8 
38.1 
39.0 
36.8 


37.7 
40.9 
40.9 
42.4 
41.2 
41.1 
38.9 
39.2 
37.9 


1.62 
1.55 
1.51 
1.61 
1.86 
1.65 
1.89 
1.87 
2.17 


1.62 
1.53 

1.48 
1.59 
1.85 
1.65 
1.89 
1.88 
2.17 


1 55 




1.47 


New Brunswick 


1 50 


Quebec 


1.54 


Ontario .... 


1 82 




1.64 


Saskatchewan . . . 


1 86 


Alberta (i) 


1.82 


British Columbia (*) 


2.12 







(1) Includes Northwest Territories. 

(2) Includes Yukon Territory. 

Note: — Information on hours and earnings by cities is obtainable from Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings (Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics). 



TABLE C-6— EARNINGS AND HOURS OF HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 



Period 


Average 

Hours 

Worked 

Per Week 


Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 


Index Number of 
Average Weekly 
Wages (1949 = 100) 




Current 
Dollars 


1949 
Dollars 


Monthly Average 1955 


No. 
41.0 
41.0 
40.4 
40.2 
40.7 

41.3 
40.9 
38.4* 

40.7 
40.4 
40.5 
40.5 
40.1 
40.4 
40.6 
40.5 
40.9 
40.7 


% 

1.45 
1.52 
1.61 
1.66 
1.72 

1.74 
1.74 
1.78 

1.77 
1.77 
1.78 
1.79 
1.79 
1.79 
1.77 
1.76 
1.77 
1.78 


S 

59.45 
62.40 
64.96 
66.77 
70.16 

71.68 
71.08 
68.48* 

71.89 

71.49 

71.94 

72.37 

71.69 

72.19 

72.01t 

71.46 

72.37 

72.62 


No. 

142.4 

149.5 

155.6 

160.0 

168.1 

171.7 
170.3 
164.1 

172.2 
171.3 
172.4 
173.4 
171.8 
173.0 
172.5 
171.2 
173.4 
174.0 


122.4 


Monthly Average 1956 


126.3 


Monthly Average 1957 


127.4 


Monthly Average 1958 


127.7 


Monthly Average 1959 


132.8 


Last Pay Period in: 

1959 October 


133.9 


November 


133.1 




128.7 


1960 January 


135.4 


February 


135.0 


March 


135.2 


April 


136.1 


liSJ.;;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::: 


134.6 


June 


135.6 


July 


134.9 


August 


133.3 


Sept.t 


134.0 


Oct.j 


134.2 







Note: The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wages in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings. DBS, page ii. 

• December 1959 figures adjusted for the holidays are 40.8 hours and $71.52. 

t Revised. 

t Latest figures subject to revision. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



83 



TABLE C-5— HOURS AND EARNINGS BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry 



Mining...... 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturinsi 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

*Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products , 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries , 

*Iron and steel products - 

Agricultural implements , 

Fabricated and structural steel , 

Hardware and tools , 

Heating and cooking appli'ances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

'Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

*Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

•Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and applia 
nces , 

Wire and cable , 

Miscellaneous electrical products , 

*Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. . 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 



Average Weekly 
Hours 



Average Hourly 
Earnings 



Sept. I Aug. Sept. 
1960 1960 1959 



no. 
42.1 

42.2 
43.0 
41.9 
40.7 
41.3 
39.5 
43.3 
40.8 
41.1 
40.6 
40.9 
40.6 
43.2 
42.6 
41.6 
40.6 
39.0 
41.8 
41.5 
40.2 
39.9 
40.9 
42.1 
40.3 
43.6 
43.5 
38.1 
37.4 
36.5 
41.3 
41.7 
40.7 
43.5 
43.2 
41.9 
42.0 
41.5 
39.3 
40.8 
38.8 
41.4 
41.6 
40.6 
40.6 
41.5 
39.7 
42.2 
40.5 
40.7 
42.0 
41.2 
40.2 
39.4 
40.3 
40.8 
43.4 
40.0 
40.3 
40.7 
41.0 
40.6 

39.9 
39.8 
40.9 
42.9 
42.0 
40.9 
40.8 
40.6 
39.5 
40.4 
41.9 
43.2 
42.9 
43.7 
43.6 
39.1 
39.2 
39.8 



no. 
41.5 

41.7 
42.5 
41.3 
40.3 
40.2 
40.6 
42.4 
40.5 
40.8 
40.3 
40.2 
39.8 
41.2 
41.9 
41.8 
39.2 
39.5 
41.1 
41.1 
40.6 
40.6 
40.9 
41.7 
39.6 
43.5 
42.7 
38.8 
38.1 
37.9 
41.3 
41.2 
40.2 
43.1 
42.1 
41.3 
41.3 
41.2 
38.9 
40.6 
37.0 
40.8 
41.4 
40.6 
40.9 
41.5 
39.7 
42.0 
40.9 
40.3 
41.3 
40.1 
39.7 
39.0 
41.1 
40.5 
42.3 
40.6 
40.1 
40.5 
40.6 
40.7 

39.1 
41.9 
40.5 
42.8 
41.7 
40.7 
39.9 
40.2 
39.7 
39.7 
41.5 
42.9 
42.3 
43.8 
43.7 
39 2 
39.6 
39.3 



no. 
41.9 

41.9 
42.7 
41.6 
41.0 
40.9 
41.3 
43.2 
41.2 
41.7 
40.8 
40.3 
42.1 
38.5 
41.6 
42.3 
39.8 
38.7 
39.9 
42.3 
40.1 
39.9 
40.5 
42.7 
40.8 
43.8 
43.9 
39.6 
39.0 
38.4 
41.4 
42.1 
41.4 
44.0 
41.7 
41.4 
41.2 
42.1 
40.3 
41.7 
39.6 
40.5 
42.7 
42.8 
42.3 
42.2 
41.1 
42.4 
42.3 
41.0 
41.5 
42.1 
41.0 
39.8 
40.5 
40.8 
42.1 
41.7 
40.1 
41.4 
41.1 
40.9 



41.8 
43.0 
41.1 
44.4 
43.8 
42.6 
40.8 
41.1 
41.2 
41.3 
42.2 
42 5 
41.9 
43.4 
44.7 
39 6 



Sept. Aug. Sept. 
1960 1960 1959 



40. 



$ 
2.07 

2.16 
1.65 
2.35 
1.94 
1.76 
2.31 
1.88 
1.77 
1.94 
1.63 
1.50 
1.82 
1.14 
1.73 
1.46 
1.98 
2.23 
1.85 
1.82 
1.21 
1.16 
1.31 
1.35 
1.36 
1.25 
1.43 
1.15 
1.16 
1.21 
1.08 
1.58 
1.69 
1.45 
1.31 
2.10 
2.26 
1.66 
2.18 
2.09 
2.01 
2.01 
1.78 
1.78 
1.98 
1.95 
2.49 
2.08 
2.02 
2.06 
2.07 
2.26 
2.01 
1.96 
2.00 
2.08 
1.82 
1.98 
2.30 
1.85 
2.06 
1.68 

1.88 
2.06 
1.73 
1.81 
1.64 
1.82 
2.55 
1.99 
1.53 
2.28 
1.45 
1.94 
2.12 
1.63 
1.84 
1 05 
1.02 
1.01 



2 07 

2.15 
1.66 
2.35 
1.93 
1.71 
2.29 
1.86 
1.76 
1.93 
1.62 
1.50 
1.83 
1.15 
1.72 
1.46 
1.96 
2.22 
1.84 
1.81 
1.20 
1.16 
1.31 
1.34 
1.36 
1.26 
1.44 
1.15 
1.15 
1.21 
1.07 
1.57 
1.67 
1.45 
1.33 
2.08 
2.24 
1.65 
2.16 
2.09 
2.01 
2.00 
1.77 
1.75 
1.97 
1.93 
2.50 
2.07 
2.03 
2.03 
2.05 
2.24 
1.96 
1.96 
1.99 
2.09 
1.80 
1.98 
2.31 
1.84 
2.06 
1.69 

1.86 
2.04 
1.72 
1.79 
1.63 
1.78 
2.52 
1.98 
1.51 
2.27 
1.47 
1 93 
2.10 
1.64 
1.83 
1.02 
0.99 
1.00 



Average Weekly 
Wages 



Sept. Aug. Sept. 
1960 1960 1959 



$ 
2.04 

2.13 
1.62 
2.31 
1.93 
1.75 
2.24 
1.79 
1.72 
1.88 
1.57 
1.50 
1.83 
1.12 
1.65 
1.42 
1.90 
2.13 
1.74 
1.80 
1.18 
1.14 
1.26 
1.30 
1.29 
1.22 
1.39 
1.12 
1.14 
1.20 
1.03 
1.53 
1.62 
1.40 
1.30 
2.00 
2.15 
1.59 
2.10 
2.03 
2.02 
1.96 
1.77 
1.74 
1.94 
1.90 
2.38 
2.00 
2.01 
2.01 
1.96 
2.24 
1.97 
1.94 
1.93 
1.98 
1.75 
1.89 
2.20 
1.78 
1.99 
1.58 

1.78 
2.01 
1.68 
1.74 
1.61 
1.71 
2.43 
1.90 
1.44 
2.19 
1.40 
1.86 
2.03 
1.56 
1.76 
1 00 
0.98 
0.97 



S 
87.21 

91.07 
70.89 
98.73 
79.18 
72.80 
91.45 
81.33 
72.34 
79.62 
66.01 
61.33 
74.04 
49.07 
73.83 
60.51 
80.54 
86.89 
77.17 
75.32 
48.42 
46.25 
53.43 
56.65 
54.77 
54.35 
62.25 
43.74 
43.18 
44.00 
44.78 
65.90 
68.81 
62.86 
56.75 
88.01 
94.96 
68.86 
85.66 
85.19 
78.23 
83.14 
74.10 
72.36 
80.27 
80.96 
98.83 
87.70 
81.70 
83.74 
86.99 
93.23 
80.61 
77.22 
80.74 
85.02 
78.82 
79.42 
92.52 
75.02 
84.71 
68.23 

74.93 
82.04 
70.89 
77.85 
68.77 
74.63 
103.89 
80.99 
60.58 
92.12 
60.59 
83.80 
91.03 
71.21 
80.58 
40.93 
39.91 
40.31 



$ 
85.90 

89.76 
70.41 
97.16 
78.03 
68.78 
93.16 
79.02 
71.46 
78.54 
65.30 
60.29 
72.78 
47.33 
71.92 
60.98 
76.78 
87.49 
75.38 
74.45 
48.96 
47.09 
53.35 
56.06 
53.73 
54.70 
61.31 
44.56 
43.97 
46.06 
44.19 
64.71 
67.21 
62.40 
55.97 
85.91 
92.25 
68.15 
84.22 
84.62 
74.32 
81.67 
73.40 
71.05 
80.56 
80.10 
99.03 
87.06 
83.12 
81.76 
84.79 
90.08 
77.94 
76.71 
82.03 
84.65 
76.09 
80.42 
92.41 
74.57 
83.51 
68.60 

72.70 
85.64 
69.83 
76.62 
67.78 
72.47 
100.54 
79.58 
59.79 
90.04 
60.87 
82.65 
89.03 
71.72 
80.13 
40.09 
39.16 
39.29 



Durable manufactured goods industries. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 

The following tables are based on regular statistical reports from local offices of the 
National Employment Service. These statistics are compiled from two different reporting 
forms, UIC 751; statistical report on employment operations by industry, and UIC 757; 
inventory of registrations and vacancies by occupation. The data on applicants and 
vacancies in these two reporting forms are not identical. 

TABLE D-1— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Period 



Unfilled Vacancies" 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Date Nearest: 
December 
December 
December 
December 
December 

December 

January- 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



1, 1954... 
1, 1955... 
1, 1956... 
1, 1957... 
1, 1958... 

1, 1959... 

1, I960.. 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1. 1960... 
1, 1960... 
1, 1960(1) 



16,104 
26,895 
27,634 
13,327 
11,579 

15,201 

9,097 
8,206 
8,431 
10,402 
15,913 
21,772 
17,227 
14,673 
13,748 
12,239 
11,944 
15,932 



10,504 
14,969 
16,442 
11,209 
9,752 

12,674 

9,779 
10,325 
10,676 
11,830 
14,487 
17,210 
15,875 
12,594 
14,427 
13,796 
10,866 
10,799 



26,608 
41,864 
44,076 
24,536 
21,331 

27,875 

18,876 
18,531 
19,107 
22,232 
30,400 
38,982 
33,102 
27,267 
28,175 
26,035 
22,810 
26.731 



255,811 

194,478 
171,326 
326,568 
329,050 

365,031 

522,206 
606,165 
634,332 
652,107 
581.558 
389,576 
258,719 
242,582 
236,969 
228,632 
281,484 
393,856 



85,229 
73,852 
74,709 
107,176 
126,341 

137,855 

157,962 
180,129 
182,721 
182,883 
174,874 
152,848 
131,936 
128,062 
117,044 
115,358 
124,255 
144.123 



341,040 
268.330 
246,035 
433,744 
455,391 

502,886 

680,168 
786,294 
817,053 
834,990 
756,432 
542,424 
390,655 
370,644 
354.013 
343,990 
405,739 
537,979 



» 



(1) Latest figures subject to revision. 

* Current Vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



85 



TABLE D-2— UNFILLED VACANCIES BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX AS AT OCTOBER 

31, 1960(1) 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 751) 



Industry 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Change from 



September 
30, 1960 



October 
30, 1959 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping 

Forestry 

Mining, Quarrying and Oil Wells 

Metal Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal Mining 

Quarrying, Clay and Sand Pits 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Foods and Beverages 

Tobacco and Tobacco Products 

Rubber Products 

Leather Products 

Textile Products (except Clothing) 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Wood Products 

Paper Products 

Printing, Pubhshing and Allied Industries. . . 

Iron and Steel Products 

Transportation Equipment 

Non-ferrous Metal Products 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 

Products of Petroleum and Coal 

Chemical Products 

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 

Construction 

General Contractors 

Special Trade Contractors 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 

PubUc rtlUty Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail ' 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

Community or Public Service 

Government Service , 

Recreation Service 

Business Service , 

Personal Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



279 
1,045 

441 

270 
131 

22 
4 

14 

2,301 

161 

9 

20 

68 

58 

94 

232 

263 

95 

397 

290 

113 

194 

60 

12 

153 

92 

1,273 

714 
559 

455 

241 

18 

196 

72 

1,718 

587 
1,131 

471 

3,790 

273 

2.596 

47 

544 

330 

11,845 



115 
7 



1,550 

255 
3 



37 

27 
10 

138 

67 
10 
61 



2,249 

319 
1,930 



6,686 

1,625 

497 

50 

253 

4,261 

11,186 



394 
1,052 

459 

275 
140 

25 
4 

15 

3,851 

416 

12 

36 

151 

116 

702 

263 

311 

146 

474 

327 

143 

253 

62 

16 

246 

177 

1,310 

741 
569 

593 

308 

28 

257 

78 

3,967 

906 
3,061 

851 

10,476 

1,898 

3,093 

97 

797 

4,591 

23,031 



845 
709 

71 

32 

25 

2 

2 

14 

915 

421 

1 

3 

9 

30 

236 

40 

19 

10 

47 

37 

27 

41 

32 

14 

11 

21 

47 

82 
35 

206 

148 

58 

17 

117 

22 
95 

144 

183 

267 

1,815 

20 

101 



- 2,620 



87 

- 1,254 

12 

46 

-j- 53 

5 

- 11 

3 



1 

1 

5 

1 

113 

246 

69 

141 

64 

201 

240 

73 

28 

47 

2 

63 

16 

435 

288 
147 

282 

367 

12 

97 

25 

396 

190 



74 

1,330 

156 

2,216 

47 

189 
1,184 

2,054 



(1) Preliminary— subject to revision. 

Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



86 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



TABLE D-3— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 
BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX AS AT NOVEMBER 3, 1960(i) 

(Soukce: Form UIC 757) 



Occupational Group 



Unfilled Vacancies(2) 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Professional and Managerial Workers 

Clerical Workers 

Sales Workers 

Personal and Domestic Service Workers. 

Seamen 

Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.). 

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers 

Food and kindred products (incl. 

tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Stone, clay and glass products 

Metalworking 

Electrical. 

Transportation equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) 

Communications and public utility. . 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

GRAND TOTAL 



1,430 
1,358 
1,129 

485 
10 

243 



55 

79 

1,006 

80 

43 

15 

438 

134 

3 

172 

621 

355 

38 

124 

924 

49 

44 

3,109 
35 

67 

43 

2,239 

725 



1,264 
2,213 
1,350 
4,667 



932 

13 

685 

1 

3 

54 



1 

124 

19 



415 
166 

4 



236 



2,694 

3,571 

2,479 

5,152 

10 

268 

5,112 

68 

764 

1,007 

83 

97 

15 

440 

148 

5 

172 

621 

360 

39 

248 

943 

58 

44 

3,524 

201 

71 

52 

2,239 



6,362 
15.727 



28,402 

1,428 

3,465 

126,558 

1,239 
2,672 
9,503 
1,094 
1,165 
499 

18,395 
2,874 
1,168 
1,690 

30,945 

21,900 

629 

4,868 

20,485 
2,487 
4,945 

92,934 

3,240 

9,555 

6,956 

41,783 

31,400 



1,999 

47,548 

13,917 

22,004 

10 

263 

18,576 

451 

11,170 

127 

509 

1,212 



1,060 
34 



1 

137 

2 

1,775 

900 

253 

11 

19,938 

4,109 

424 

583 

1 

14,821 



8,361 

63,275 

20,525 

50,406 

1,438 

3,728 

145,134 

1,690 

13,842 

9,630 

1,603 

2,377 

537 

19,291 

3,934 

1,202 

1,690 

30,946 

22,037 

631 

6,643 

21,385 

2,740 

4,956 

112,872 
7,349 
9,979 
7,539 
41,784 
46,221 



11,944 



10,866 



22,810 



281,484 



124,255 



405,739 



(') Preliminary — subject to revision. 

(*) Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 



87 



TABLE D-4- 



UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS AT NOVEMBER 3, 1960 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Office 


Unfilled Vacancies («) 


Registrations 


0) 

Nov. 3. 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Sept. 29, 

1960 


Previous 

Year 
Oct. 29, 

1959 


0) 

Nov. 3, 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Sept. 29, 

1960 


Previous 
Year 

Oct. 29. 
1959 


Newfoundland 


306 

16 

7 

283 

137 

48 
89 

1,233 

13 

21 

1,017 


356 

30 

3 

323 

516 

156 
360 

800 

17 

23 

411 


395 

20 

21 

354 

260 

91 
169 

680 

12 

18 

405 


7,534 

1,673 

860 

5,001 

1,288 
745 
543 

15,978 

571 

831 
4,628 

208 
1,300 

413 
1,838 

878 
3,085 
1,104 
1,122 

13,341 

1,196 

1,317 
579 

1,321 
426 

3.108 
923 

2,700 
828 
365 
578 

115,628 

1,097 

383 

377 

746 

710 

788 

242 

1,623 

324 

668 

1,454 

434 

217 

316 

1,607 

2,421 

2,568 

1.828 

550 

499 

512 

2,307 

748 

511 

420 

488 

504 

411 

626 

49,002 

403 

386 

8,434 

1,484 

1,412 

720 

1,766 

572 

745 

1,635 

1,537 

1,716 

1,382 

1,030 

2,459 

4,071 

1,601 

936 

3.123 


6,081 

1,321 

547 

4,213 

968 

605 
363 

14,270 

443 
706 

4,182 
218 
973 
369 

1,763 
823 

3,244 
930 
619 

10,536 

783 
1,335 

457 
1,241 

339 
2,272 

780 
2,186 

526 

296 

321 

98,810 

967 

363 

299 

595 

469 

614 

285 

1,385 

176 

538 

1,266 

300 

159 

211 

1,411 

2,041 

2,173 

1,536 

416 

670 

445 

2,008 

610 

396 

257 

299 

356 

308 

505 

43,665 

303 

338 

7,154 

1,143 

930 

698 

1,554 

439 

608 

1,348 

1,358 

1,488 

865 

969 

1,982 

2,991 

1,470 

667 

2.939 


5,821 




1,437 


Grand Falls 


516 


St John's 


3,868 




1,123 

749 


Charlottetown 




374 


Nova Scotia 


12,150 

447 




Bridgewater 


672 


Halifax 


3,935 


Inverness 


180 


Kentville 


68 
18 
13 


149 
29 
27 


81 

9 

31 

4 
24 
28 
68 

725 

37 

28 

4 

155 
45 

165 
2 

213 
18 
13 
45 

6,607 

17 
30 

140 
24 
68 
14 
11 

533 
18 
66 
33 
16 

398 
1 

19 
33 
78 
23 
16 
10 

561 

58 

22 

2 

133 

11 

2 

37 

25 

2,315 

3 


761 




261 


New Glasgow 


1,253 




826 


Sydney 


45 

9 

29 

1,236 

18 

27 

17 

120 

118 

750 

3 

129 

36 

10 

8 

5,263 

8 

17 

31 

26 

22 

78 

6 

145 

25 

19 

43 

10 

4 

5 

21 

42 

43 

20 

18 

29 

179 

28 

15 

6 

7 

9 

22 

20 

12 

1,976 

66 

5 

455 

51 

8 

57 

128 

54 

73 

19 

25 

50 

31 

294 

41 

284 

54 

30 

179 


58 
51 
35 

775 

26 

8 

27 

125 

124 

210 

4 

187 

12 

11 

41 

7,211 

12 

1 

221 

32 

17 

93 

8 

133 

34 

97 

28 

87 

92 

15 

102 

44 

99 

22 

16 

297 

645 

24 

15 

5 

72 

14 

1 

15 

13 

2,396 

83 

20 

537 

114 

41 

84 

49 

11 

85 

137 

47 

48 

57 

408 

130 

253 

43 

30 

96 


2,243 


Truro 


739 


Yarmouth 


833 


New Brunswick 


10,419 


Bathurst 


825 




708 


Edmundston 


479 




942 




256 


Moncton 


2,561 




911 


Saint John 


1,934 


St. Stephen 


986 


Sussex 


306 


Woodstock 


511 


Quebec 


89,386 




1,261 


Asbestos 


366 




337 


Beauharnois 


605 




501 




545 


Chandler 


223 




1,209 


Cowansville 


265 


Dolbeau .' 


531 


Drummondville 


1,250 


Farnham 


521 


Forestville 


224 


Gaspe 


212 




1,022 


Hull 


1,708 


Joliette 


1,987 




1,279 


Lachute 


417 




473 


La Tuque 


575 


L4vis 


1,555 


Louiseville 


529 


Magog 


613 


Maniwaki 


254 


Matane 


396 




470 


Mont-Laurier 


218 




491 


Montreal : 


36,161 


New Richmond 


275 


Port Alfred 


327 


Quebec ; 


430 
88 
21 

223 
44 
14 
66 
29 
62 
58 
65 

192 
68 

157 
37 
58 

146 


7,079 




1,127 


Riviere du Loup 


990 


Roberval 


581 




1,327 


Ste. Agathe 


432 


Ste. Anne de Bellevue 


521 


Ste. Therese 


1,149 


St. Hyacinthe 


1,461 


St. Jean 


1,517 


St. J6rome 


981 


Sept-lles 


697 




1,967 


Sherbrooke 


3,122 


Sorel 


1,326 


Thetford Mines 


1,343 


Trois-Rivi^res 


2,559 



88 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



TABLE D-4— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS AT NOVEMBER 3, 1960 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Office 


Unfilled Vacancies (2) 


Registrations 


0) 

Nov. 3, 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Sept. 29, 

1960 


Previous 
Year 

Oct. 29, 
1959 


0) 

Nov. 3, 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Sept. 29, 

1960 


Previous 
Year 

Oct. 29. 
1959 


Quebec— Cont'd. 

Val d'Or 


47 

12 

25 

389 

8,200 

43 
19 
29 
18 
56 
43 
33 
10 
29 
43 
3 

104 
38 
4 
13 
76 
54 
3 
17 
29 

896 
12 
20 
16 

129 
34 

124 

21 

8 

43 

462 

105 
6 
5 
41 
35 
28 
92 
12 
69 

807 
51 


15 

16 

34 

223 

9,021 

55 

24 
46 
42 
32 
66 
26 
7 

100 

57 

5 

100 

19 

7 

24 

83 

130 

2 

23 

33 

824 
23 
42 
13 
92 
43 

175 
33 
21 
54 

537 

186 
13 
9 

46 
37 
46 

111 
17 
91 

888 
41 
2 
99 
27 
48 
7 

168 
11 
32 
10 

236 
41 

101 

141 

108 
25 
12 
75 
25 

144 
35 
34 
2,740 
88 
55 
22 

109 

136 

226 
41 

2,295 

176 
25 
22 
73 
90 
1,909 


22 
18 
22 
70 

8,933 

39 
22 
39 
46 
37 
94 
43 
6 

68 
39 
32 
92 
88 
4 
22 
77 
82 
7 
41 
44 

882 
24 
23 
18 
92 
61 

164 
23 
11 
24 

555 

137 
15 
5 

101 
35 
22 

105 
25 

111 

887 
51 


1,420 
1,640 
1,530 
1,245 

148,423 

203 

1,145 

1,552 

691 

1,259 

2,813 

630 

131 

1,651 

641 

564 

2,750 

249 

553 

313 

1,655 

1,704 

215 

421 

1,659 

13,428 

433 

796 

485 

1,737 

1,013 

2,208 

975 

460 

246 

4,681 

3,582 

498 

356 

1,031 

2,071 

1,352 

907 

917 

5,000 

5,013 

1,100 

317 

1,299 

422 

2,910 

272 

2,298 

796 

553 

309 

3,360 

1,221 

2,195 

2,048 

892 

109 

338 

589 

621 

2,827 

355 

1,644 

38,104 

699 

548 

488 

2,013 

3,209 

7,804 

1,095 

15,034 

1,133 
648 
200 
556 
244 
12.253 


1,299 

1,358 

1,203 

983 

132,286 

184 

972 

1,212 

479 

1,155 

2,839 

543 

112 

1,071 

653 

563 

2,372 

254 

390 

195 

1,042 

1,060 

194 

314 

1,429 

12,057 

338 

489 

277 

1,623 

783 

2,140 

499 

492 

202 

4,017 

3,257 

461 

267 

i.Oll 

1,328 

1,019 

993 

738 

6,536 

4,704 

888 

150 

1,066 

197 

2,545 

120 

1,548 

551 

413 

266 

3,073 

739 

1,646 

2,008 

663 

121 

267 

611 

381 

2,381 

346 

1,280 

36,487 

479 

494 

343 

1,577 

3,243 

7,039 

1,100 

11,086 

725 
323 
105 
333 
153 
9,447 


1,118 


Valleyfield 


1,260 




1,105 


Ville St. Georges 


924 


Ontario 


108,082 

180 


Arnprior 




882 


Belleville 


1,047 




479 


Brampton 


1,388 




1,693 


Brockville 


348 


Carleton Place 


180 


Chatham 


1,236 




460 


Collingwood 


380 


Cornwall 


1,962 


Elliot Lake 


300 


Fort Erie 


426 


Fort Frances 


269 


Fort William 


1,231 


Gait . . 


923 




142 


Goderich 


324 


Guelph 


1,212 


Hamilton 


8,366 




372 


ICapuskasing 


516 




359 


Kingston . . 


1,386 


Kirkland Lake 


701 


Kitchener . 


1,159 




885 


Lindsay 


378 




141 


London . 


3,230 




2,644 


Midland . 


413 




276 


JNewmarket 


941 


Niagara Falls 


1,561 


North Bay . 


1,009 


Oakville 


578 


Orillia 


526 




3,473 


Ottawa . 


3,890 




697 




304 




70 

19 

36 

6 

156 
9 
14 
13 

118 
36 
94 

131 
77 
4 
7 
65 
22 

334 
23 
30 
2,702 
64 
36 
15 
64 

165 

193 
17 

1,732 

162 
15 
25 
55 
49 
1,426 


90 

19 

62 

11 

131 

4 

30 

8 

158 

52 

58 

288 

40 

12 

7 

25 

8 

117 

26 

71 

2,852 

79 

58 

8 

50 

135 

182 

59 

2,838 
167 
16 
26 
44 
61 

2.524 


1,034 


Perth 


261 


Peterborough 


2,050 


Picton 


244 


Port Arthur 


1,891 


Port Colborne 


420 


Prescott 


458 


Renfrew 


289 


St. Catharines 


2,571 


St. Thomas ... 


1,130 




1,332 


Sault Ste. Marie . . . 


1,107 


Simcoe 


603 


Sioux Lookout 


119 


Smiths Falls 


246 


Stratford 


507 


Sturgeon Falls 


616 




2,037 


Tillsonburg 


417 




1,230 


Toronto 


28,243 


Trenton 


510 


Walkerton 


425 


Wallaceburg 


426 


WeUand 


983 


Weston . .. 


3,230 


Windsor 


6,122 


Woodstock 


714 


Manitoba 


11,260 




1,075 


Dauphin 


573 


Flin Flon . . 


205 


Portage la Prairie 


601 


The Pas ... 


203 


Winnipeg 


8,603 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



89 



TABLE D-4— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS AT NOVEMBER 3, 1960 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Office 


Unfilled Vacancies(2) 


Registrations 


0) 

Nov. 3. 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Sept. 29, 

1960 


Previous 
Year 

Oct. 29, 
1959 


0) 

Nov. 3, 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Sept. 29, 

1960 


Previous 
Year 

Oct. 29, 
1959 




1,218 

20 

24 

64 

39 

103 

217 

207 

83 

17 

444 

1,711 

24 

439 

10 

890 

76 

42 

101 

56 

73 

1,774 

25 

13 

54 

23 

16 

15 

22 

34 

28 

18 

251 

200 

9 

7 

34 

10 

52 

15 

67 

720 

8 

111 

42 

22,810 

11,944 
10,866 


974 

34 

29 

103 

49 

81 

240 

269 

68 

39 

62 

2,231 

9 

537 

15 

1,237 

13 

73 

154 

94 

99 

1,856 

27 
20 
34 
27 
24 
10 
18 
34 
23 
10 
200 
221 
21 
30 
32 
16 
9 
12 
77 
841 
16 
99 
55 

26,035 

12,239 
13,796 


763 

42 
14 
123 
23 
41 
218 
165 
47 
24 
66 

2,058 

19 

631 

25 

1,032 

27 


9,676 

227 

224 

933 

583 

1,095 

2,704 

2,310 

390 

199 

1,011 

22,364 

374 

8,271 

228 

9,296 

497 

548 

1,421 

897 

832 

56,473 

1,326 
905 
700 
729 
564 
996 
588 
166 
898 

1,110 
737 

8,825 
842 
728 

2,305 

1,243 
348 

1,113 

582 

25,666 

1,083 

4,581 
438 

405,739 

281,484 
124,255 


6,620 

121 
150 
590 
424 
733 
1,867 
1,738 
201 
118 
678 

16,992 

180 
6,602 
179 
7,301 
261 
351 
894 
699 
525 

46,341 

961 
787 
508 
551 
503 
735 
372 
128 
634 
841 
410 

7,156 
458 
614 

1,391 
852 
190 
705 
366 
23,386 
548 

3,935 
310 

343,990 

228,632 
115,358 


8,161 

292 


Estevan 


Llovdminster 


159 




830 


North Battleford 


521 


Prince Albert 


1,081 

1,987 

1,833 

331 


Regina 


Saskatoon 


Swift Current 


Weyburn 


214 


Yorkton 


913 


Alberta 


14,488 
200 




Calgary 


5,354 
171 




Edmonton 


6 487 


Edson . 


373 


Grande Prairie 




Lethbridge 


104 
141 
79 

1,751 

27 
23 
23 
22 
19 

8 
20 
37 

6 
14 
10 
198 
14 
16 
60 

6 
11 
11 
46 
1,012 
14 
144 
20 

25,010 

11,997 
13,013 


935 




444 


Red Deer 


524 


British Columbia 


42,333 

829 


Chilliwack 




514 


Cranbrook. ... . . 


475 




627 


Duncan 


477 


Kamloops 


763 




481 


Kitimat 


147 




684 


Nanaimo 


740 




617 


New Westminster 


6 036 


Penticton 


486 


Port Alberni 


520 




1,918 




1,157 


Princeton 


203 




922 


Trail 


609 




19,286 


Vernon .' 


858 


Victoria 


3,647 
337 


Whitehorse 


Canada 


303,223 


Males 


195,816 


Females 


107,407 







(1) Preliminary subject to revision. 

(2) Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-5— PLACEMENTS EFFECTED BY EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 751) 
1955—1960 



Year 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Atlantic 
Region 


Quebec 
Region 


Ontario 
Region 


Prairie 
Region 


Pacific 
Region 


1955 


953,576 
1,046,979 
877,704 
840,129 
986,073 
848,701 
795,184 


642,726 
748,464 
586,780 
548,663 
661,872 
573,207 
530,001 


310.850 
298,515 
290,924 
291,466 
324,201 
275,494 
265,183 


67,619 
68,522 
59,412 
56,385 
70.352 
57,929 
70,746 


222,370 
252,783 
215,335 
198,386 
239,431 
206,043 
207,644 


343,456 
379,085 
309,077 
287,112 
336,527 
289,435 
249,224 


178,015 
210,189 
185,962 
181,772 
211.951 
182.969 
166.388 


142,116 


1966 


136,400 


1967 


107,918 


1958 


116 474 


1959 


127,812 


1969 (10 months) 


112,325 


1960 (10 months) 


102,282 







90 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



E — Unemployment Insurance 



TABLE E-1— BEN1EFICIARIES AND BENEFIT PAYMENTS BY PROVINCE, OCTOBER 

1960 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province 


Estimated 
Average 

Number of 
Beneficiaries 

Per Week 
(in thousands) 


Weeks 
Paid 


Amount 

of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 




4.0 
0.6 
10.5 

7.7 
67.2 
85.9 
7.1 
3.9 
10.8 
28.2 


15,799 

2,462 

41,903 

30,700 

268,984 

343,642 

28,274 

15,750 

43,115 

112,774 


342,739 

46,856 

917,198 


Prince Edward Island . ... . . 




New Brunswick ..... .... 


657 156 


Quebec 


5,948,623 


Ontario .... . . 


8,072,034 
617,230 




Saskatchewan . 


333 182 


Alberta 


983,653 


British Columbia 


2,732 251 






Total, Canada, Oct. 1960 


225.9 
222.7 
159.8 


903,403 
935,396 
671,150 


20 650 922 


Total, Canada, Sept. 1960 


21,186,260 


Total, Canada, Oct. 1959 


13 765 753 







TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS* CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES BY 
NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, AND PERCENTAGE 
POSTAL, OCTOBER 31, 1960 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 
Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Total 
claimants 


Number of weeks on claim 


Percent- 
age 
Postal 


October 

30, 1959 

Total 

claimants 


Province and Sex 


2 or 
Less 


3-4 


5-8 


9-12 


13-16 


17-20 


Over 
20 


Canada 


330,223 
230,025 
100,198 


121,806 
93,860 
27,946 


41,306 
30,277 
11,029 


52,063 
36,138 
15,925 


33,316 
21,883 
11,433 


22,578 
13,527 
9,051 


14,860 
8,583 
6,277 


44,294 
25,757 
18,537 


25.7 
27.1 
22.4 


250,583 


Male 


164,391 




86,192 








6,886 
5,718 
1,168 

896 
588 
308 

14,069 
11,277 
2,792 

11,286 
8,456 
2,830 

99,111 
67,991 
31,120 

118,603 
79,761 
38,842 

12,294 
8,185 
4,109 

6,917 
4,463 
2,454 

16,468 
11,305 
5,163 

43,693 
32,281 
11,412 


2,665 

2,430 

235 

375 

293 

82 

4,924 

4,252 

672 

4,054 

3,345 

709 

36,462 

27,629 

8,833 

41,634 
30,735 
10,899 

5,328 
4,005 
1,323 

2,815 

2,170 

645 

6,587 
5,182 
1,405 

16,962 
13,819 
3,143 


767 
656 
111 

81 
60 
21 

1,647 

1,339 

308 

1,358 

1,077 
281 

12,487 
9,020 
3,467 

14,941 
10,687 
4,254 

1,551 

1.016 

535 

812 
550 
262 

1,821 

1,308 

513 

5,841 
4,564 
1,277 


859 
702 
157 

130 

78 
52 

2,288 

1,828 

460 

1,780 

1,354 

426 

15,860 
11,236 
4,624 

19,036 
12,735 
6,301 

1,672 
968 
704 

961 
522 
439 

2,488 

1,618 

870 

6,989 
5,097 
1,892 


576 
440 
136 

66 
30 
36 

1,341 
991 
350 

1,334 
929 
405 

9,836 
6,438 
3,398 

12,558 
8,144 
4,414 

1,174 
695 
479 

631 
318 
313 

1,479 
852 
627 

4,321 
3,046 
1,275 


494 
366 
128 

63 
34 
29 

945 
695 
250 

801 
460 
341 

6,960 
3,919 
3,041 

8,418 
5,150 
3,268 

658 
392 
266 

450 
225 
225 

989 
534 
455 

2,800 
1,752 
1,048 


317 

207 
110 

55 
25 
30 

569 
385 
184 

405 
240 
165 

4,617 
2,503 
2,114 

5,587 
3,265 
2,322 

477 
290 
187 

318 
154 
164 

759 
432 
327 

1,756 

1,082 

674 


1,208 
917 
291 

126 

68 
58 

2,355 

1,787 
568 

1,554 

1,051 

503 

12,889 
7,246 
5,643 

16,429 
9,045 
7,384 

1,434 
819 
615 

930 
524 
406 

2,345 

1,379 

966 

5,024 
2,921 
2,103 


59.8 
62.0 
48.9 

59.6 
64.8 
49.7 

40.8 
42.0 
36.2 

53.0 
55.5 
45.6 

26.1 

27.5 
22.9 

19.4 
19.5 
19.2 

18.9 
21.5 
13.7 

40.5 
43.7 
34.6 

22.6 
23.6 
20.5 

24.6 
25.9 
20.9 


5,659 


Male 


4,754 


Female 


905 


Prince Edward Island 

Male .... 


852 
542 




310 




10,927 


Male .. . 


8,225 


Female 


2,702 


New Brunswick 


9,357 


Male ... 


6,679 


Fem^ 


2,678 




78,010 


Male 


51,122 




26,888 




86,444 


Male 


53,044 


Female 


33,400 




8,828 


Male 


5,827 




3,001 


Saskatchewan 


6,456 


Male 


4,273 




2,183 


Alberta 


11,006 


Male 


6,964 


Female . . 


4,042 


British Columbia 

Male 


33,044 
22,961 


Female . . . 


10,083 







• Changes in the wording of this heading do not involve any change in concept. 
THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



91 



TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT BY PROVINCE, 

OCTOBER, 1960 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act. D.B.S. 





Claims filed at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims Pending at 
End of Month 


Province 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




3,386 
463 

10,098 
5,634 

50,828 

62,406 
7,060 
4,175 
9,878 

24,283 


2,319 

304 

4,562 

3,493 

29,924 

35,963 

4,603 

2,754 

5,900 

14,097 


1.067 

159 

5,536 

2,141 

20,904 

26,443 

2,457 

1,421 

3,978 

10,186 


2,729 

387 

9,168 

4,906 

46,246 

58,080 

6,071 

3.453 

9,449 

22,023 


1,878 

270 

7,461 

3,648 

35,112 

43,987 

4,357 

2,395 

7,274 

15,949 


851 

117 

1,707 

1,258 

11,134 

14,093 

1.714 

1,058 

2.175 

6.074 


1,294 


Prince Edward Island 


157 




2.384 


New Brunswick 


1.659 


Quebec 


14,521 




17,675 


Manitoba 


1.848 




1,268 


Alberta 


2,671 


British Colum.bia 


6,636 






Total, Canada, Oct. 1960 

Total, Canada, Sept. 1960 

Total, Canada, Oct. 1959 


178,211 
140,328 
151,191 


103,919 
79,173 
96,354 


74,292 
61,155 
54,837 


162,512 
143,276 
138,239 


122,331 
109,220 
99,922 


40.181 
34,056 
38,317 


50,113 
34,414 
41.652 



* In addition, revised claims received numbered 34.428. 

t In addition, 32,721 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 3,645 were special requests not granted and 1,215 
were appeals by claimants. There were 8,272 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



TABLE E-4— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



End of: 


Total 


Employed 


Claimants 


1960— September 


3,999,100 
4,040,000 
4,024,000 
4,048,000 
3,988,000 
4,222,000 
4,307,000 
4,308,000 
4,296,000 

4,295,000 
4,131,000 
4,032,000 


3,719.600 
3,759,800 
3,729,900 
3,751,600 
3,623,700 
3,507,100 
3,484,000 
3,493,800 
3.513.500 

3,609,300 
3,713,500 
3,781,400 


279,500 


August 


280,200 


July . . . . 


294,100 




296,400 


May 


364,300 


April 


714,900 


March 


823,000 




814,200 




#782,500 


1959— December 


685,700 


November 


417,500 


October 


250.600 







92 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1967 



F — ^Prices 

TABLE F-l— TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

(1949 = 100) 
Calculated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



Total 



Food 



Shelter 



Clothing 



Household 
operation 



Other 
Commodi- 
ties and 
Services 



1954— Year 

1955— Year 

1956— Year 

1957— Year 

1958— Year 

1959— November 
December. 

1960— February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September, 
October..., 
November 
December. 



116.2 

116.4 

118.1 

121.9 

125.1 

128.3 
127.9 

127.2 
126.9 
127.5 
127.4 
127.6 
127.5 
127.9 
128.4 
129.4 
129.6 
129.6 



112.2 

112.1 

113.4 

118.6 

122.1 

123.8 
122.4 

120.8 
119.4 
120.9 
120.2 
120.8 
120.5 
121.7 
123.3 
125.8 
125.5 
125.3 



126.5 

129.4 

132.5 

134.9 

138.4 

142.6 
142.7 

142.9 
142.9 
143.3 
143.5 
143.8 
143.9 
144.0 
144.2 
144.3 
144.5 
144.6 



109.4 

108.0 

108.6 

108.5 

109.7 

111.4 
111.4 

109.8 
110.4 
110.8 
110.8 
110.9 
110.8 
110.3 
110.5 
111.2 
112.5 
112.6 



117.4 
116.4 
117.1 
119.6 
121.0 



123. 
123. 



123.2 
123.4 
123.5 
123.1 
123.0 
123.0 
123.1 
123.3 
123.5 
123.5 
123.5 



117.4 

118.1 

120.9 

126.1 

130.9 

136.9 
136.8 

137.0 
137.0 
137.1 
137.6 
137.7 
137.6 
137.7 
137.6 
137.8 
138.3 
138.3 



TABLE F-2— CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES FOR REGIONAL CITIES OF CANADA AT 
THE BEGINNING OF NOVEMBER 1960 

(1949 = 100) 





Total 


Food 


Shelter 


Clothing 


House- 
hold 
Operation 


Other 
Commod- 
ities 
and 
Services 




November 
1959 


October 
1960 


November 
1960 


(») St. John's, Nfld 


114.6 
127.7 
129.2 
128.7 
128.6 
130.5 
125.7 
124.6 
124.7 
129.8 


115.0 
128.1 
130.0 
129.1 
130.2 
132.1 
127.1 
125.7 
125.6 
130.5 


115.9 
128.4 
130.0 
129.7 
130.2 
131.9 
127.7 
125.5 
125.7 
130.8 


108.9 
119.9 
124.4 
130.0 
125.9 
125.8 
124.2 
123.0 
120.4 
126.3 


115.1 
135.1 
140.6 
146.0 
148.8 
153.1 
135.5 
125.0 
125.5 
137.8 


110.7 
122.0 
119.7 
108.1 
117.0 
115.0 
118.8 
124.0 
121.3 
117.5 


111.7 
129.3 
124.1 
119.0 
121.7 
123.8 
120.2 
125.8 
127.5 
135.8 


133.0 


Halifax 


140.4 


Saint John 


143.0 




138.8 


Ottawa 


138.3 


Toronto 


140.3 


Winnipeg ... 


137.3 




129.5 


Edmonton-Calgary . 


133.7 




137.5 







N.B. — Indexes above measure percentage changes in prices over time in each city and should not be used to compare 
actual levels of prices as between cities. 

(}) St. John's index on the base June 1951 = 100. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1961 



93 



TABLE G-1— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1955-60 



Month or Year 



Strikes and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During Month 

or Year 



Strikes and Lockouts in Existence During Month or Year 



Strikes and 
Lockouts 



Workers 
Involved 



Duration in Man-Days 



Man-Days 



Per Cent of 

Estimated 

Working Time 



1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

4959 

4959: November 
December. 

4960: January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November, 



149 
221 
242 
253 
202 

8 
13 

13 
14 
19 
15 
21 
24 
22 
30 
27 
30 
28 



159 
229 
249 
262 
217 

18 
22 

20 
25 
27 
29 
38 
43 
37 
42 
52 
56 
58 



60,090 
88,680 
91,409 
112,397 
99,872 

4,392 
3.836 

3,531 
3,994 
3,237 
2,476 
7,152 
7,309 
5,067 
10,958 
11,877 
9,027 
5,491 



1,875,400 
1,246,000 
1,634,880 
2,872,340 
2,386,680 

59,740 
56,050 

58,440 
50,320 
26,820 
26,870 
74,900 
53,260 
37,770 
129,180 
114,610 
90,830 
53.180 



0.18 
0.11 
0.14 
0.24 
0.19 

0.06 
0.05 

0.06 
0.05 
0.03 
0.03 
0.07 
0.05 
0.04 
0.12 
0.11 
0.08 
0.05 



•Preliminary. 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
NOVEMBER 1960, BY INDUSTRY 

(Prelimary) 



Industry 



Logging 

Fishing 

Mining 

Manufacturing 

Construction 

Transportation etc 

Public utilities 

Trade 

Service 

All industries. 



Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 



58 



Workers 
Involved 



40 

167 

3,250 

1,150 

639 

180 

65 



5.491 



Man-Day 



240 

3,470 

36.500 

5,850 

5,620 

790 

710 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
NOVEMBER 1960, BY JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 



Jurisdiction 


Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man-Day 


Newfoundland 


1 

4 

8 

32 

5 

2 
2 
3 


100 

137 

677 

2,818 

861 

30 
402 

88 
378 


2.200 


Prince Edward Island.. . 
Nova Scotia 


1.070 






Quebec 


6,590 


Ontario 


21,500 




12,780 




180 


Alberta 


3,610 


British Columbia 

Federal 


950 
4,300 






All jurisdictions 


58 


5.491 


53,180 



TABLE G-4 STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

NOVEMBER 1960 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Union 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in 
Man-Days 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


Major Issues 


Employer 
Location 


Novem- 
ber 


Accu- 
mulated 


Result 


Mining — 

Non-Metal Mining — 
Newfoundland Fluorspar 
St. Lawrence, Nfld. 

Manufacturino— 

Clothing— 

Taran Furs, Montreal, Que. 


St. Lawrence Workers' 
Protective Union (Ind.) 

Butcher Workmen Loc. 400 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


100 
100 


2,200 
300 


4.070 
300 


Oct. 14 

Nov. 28 
Nov. 30 


Disciplinary dismissal of 
worker8~ 

Wages, clause curtailing sub- 
contracting~$6 per week in- 
crease. 



94 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7961 



TABLE G-4r-STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

NOVEMBER 1960 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 
Employer 
Location 


Union 


Workers 
Involevd 


Duration in 
Man-Days 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


Major Issues 


Novem- 
ber 


Accu- 
mulated 


Result 


Paper Products — 
Building Products, 
Pont-Rouge, Que. 


Pulp and Paper Workers 
Federation (CNTU) 


290 

(20) 


1,450 


1,450 


Nov. 24 


Wages- 


Iron and Steel Products- 
Canadian Tim ken, 
St. Thomas, Ont. 


Steelworkers Loc. 4906 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


292 

(70) 


5,940 


22,470 


Aug. 12 


Wages, working conditions, 
fringe benefits— 


Dominion Bridge, 

Mount Dennis, Toronto, Ont. 


Steelworkers Loc. 3390 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


450 


1,100 


25,410 


Aug. 15 

Nov. 7 


Wages, fringe benefits ~ 3j« 
hourly increase the first year, 
3f* an hour the second year, a 
further 2^ an hour three 
months before expiry date; 
improved fringe benefits. 


Dominion Bridge, 
Calgary, Alta. 


Steelworkers Loc. 5044 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


302 


1,810 


16,910 


Aug. 19 
Nov. 9 


Wages, fringe benefits~3^ an 
hour increase on signing, 30 
Nov. 1961; improved fringe 
benefits. 


Manitoba Rolling Mills, 
Selkirk. Man. 


Steelworkers Loc. 5442 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


385 


6,930 


25,390 


Aug. 25 
Nov. 28 


Wages, fringe benefits—Sii an 
hour immediate increase. 


Manitoba Bridge and Engineer- 
ing Works, 
Winnipeg, Man. 


Steelworkers Loc. 4087 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


238 


3,570 


14,620 


Aug. 25 
Nov. 23 


Wages, fringe benefits'>'3j5 an 
hour immediate increase, 3(4 
an hour effective Nov. 23, 
1961; 2(* an hour May 23, 1962; 
improved fringe benefits. 


Dominion Bridge, 
Winnipeg, Man. 


Steelworkers Loc. 4095 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


203 


2,230 


9,640 


Aug. 25 
Nov. 17 


Wages, fringe benefits~5j5 an 
hour increase. 


Dominion Bridge, 
Edmonton, Alta. 


Steelworkers Loc. 3345 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


100 


1,800 


6,860 


Aug. 26 
Nov. 28 


Wages, fringe benefits ~ 
Increased wages, improved 
fringe benefits. 


Miscellaneous Manufacturing — 
Sperry Gyroscope Co. of Canada, 
St. Laurent, Que. 

Construction — 

Anglin Norcross Construction, 

Toronto, Ont. 


I.U.E. Loc. 514 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


204 


3,780 


12,090 


Sept. 15 


Wages'^ 


Bricklayers Loc, 26 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


135 


1,890 


1,890 


Nov. 7 
Nov. 28 


Refusal to accept stone cut 
by non-union personnel— 
Return of workers when 
settlement reached. 


Mutual Investments, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Several building trades 
unions (AFL-CIO/CLC) 


383 


770 


770 


Nov. 11 
Nov. 15 


Closed shop ~ Return of 
workers. 


W. B. Sullivan Construction, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Labourers Loc. 183 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


110 


110 


110 


Nov. 21 
Nov. 22 


Non-union labour on paving 
job—Return of workers. 


Twenty Electrical Contractors, 
Kitchener- Waterloo, other 
points, Ont. 


I.B.E.W. Loc. 804 (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 


180 


1,620 


1,620 


Nov. 21 


Wages- 


HoUy Dunfield Sydicates, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Lathers Loc. 97 (AFL-CIO 
/CLC) 


116 


230 


230 


Nov. 21 
Nov. 23 


Non-union lathers on job- 
Withdrawal of pickets. 


Transportation Etc. 
Transportation— 
Sandwich-Windsor and Am herst- 

burg Railway, 
Windsor, Ont. 


Street Railway Employees 
Loc. 616 (AFL-CIO/CLC) 


186 


930 


930 


Nov. 24 


Wages- 


Storage— 

Five Grain Elevators, 

Vancouver, B.C. 


Brewery Workers Loc. 333 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


325 


4,230 


4,230 


Nov. 8 
Nov. 28 


Wages, fringe benefits- 17^)^. 
an hour increase during first 
year of agreement, 8(4 an hour 
the second year; improved 
fringe benefits. 


Public UTiLrrY Operation — 
PubUc Utilities Commission 

(Telephone Dept.) 
Port Arthur, Ont. 


I.B.E.W. Loc. 339 (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 


157 


670 


670 


Nov. 9 
Nov. 17 


Wages— 2|% wage increase 
in each of the years 1959, 1960 
& 1961. 



Figures in parentheses indicate the number of workers indirectly affected. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 196 1 



95 



TABLE H-1— INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES IN CANADA DURING THE THIRD 
QUARTER OF 1960 BY GROUP OF INDUSTRIES AND CAUSES 



Cause 


1 
< 


.S 


bS 

1 

S 

1 


1.^ 

If 
.S g 


3 

1 

3 
§ 


a 
o 

1 


1 


(5 


fi 


<D 


8 


.1 

> 

1 


T3 
0) 

1 


1 












1 

4 

"i' 

3 
5 


1 

3 

9 
2 
9 
14 


1 
1 

"2' 












3 


Struck by: 

(a ^ TrirAt mnphinprv prnnp«s pt.P 


1 






? 


2 

8 

1 

6 

20 

1 
7 
1 










n 


(b) Moving vehicles ... 






2 
17 
7 
9 






2 
2 

1 
6 

1 
4 
3 

2 




?i 




1 


14 








44 


Caught in or between machinery, vehicles, etc 


1 

4 




?7 




13 

4 

4 

1 
1 


2 




75 


Falls and slips: 

(a) Falls on same level 


6 


(b) Falls to different levels 


2 

1 


7 


2 
3 


13 

4 

1 
4 

1 


16 
4 

"4' 

1 


3 

1 

1 
5 


2 




60 


Conflagrations, temperature extremes and explosions. . 

Inhalation, absorptions, asphyxiation and industrial 

diseases 


17 






11 


Electric current 


2 




2 






18 












1 
2 




3 


Miscellaneous accidents 


1 




1 


2 




1 






7 
















Total third quarter 1960 


26 


21 


8 


50 


43 


63 


14 


49 


7 




24 




305 






Total third quarter 1959 


48 


30 


8 


39 


68 


87 


11 


52 


21 




25 




389 







TABLE H-2— INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES BY PROVINCE AND GROUPS OF 
INDUSTRIES DURING THE THIRD QUARTER OF 1900 



Industry 




l-H 


a: 
1^ 


i 


1 


3 


i 


1 


i 
< 




is: 


3 
e2 


Agriculture 




1 


2 


2 
1 
1 
2 
...... 


1 

4 

...... 

9 
10 
2 

9 
2 


15 
5 

1 
12 
17 
17 

5 

22 

1 


3 


2 








26 




2 




9 

2 
12 

4 
12 

2 


1 
2 


21 


Fishing and Trapping . . . 




2 
6 
3 
2 








8 


Mining and Quarrying 


2 
2 


...... 

1 


1 
3 
3 


2 

1 
2 


7 
4 

13 
2 

5 

1 


50 


Manufacturing . . . 


43 




63 


Public Utilities 


2 


14 


Transportation, Storage and Com- 
munications 


1 


1 


1 


3 

1 


49 


Trade 


1 




7 












Service 






1 


1 


2 


12 






4 






24 


Unclassified 






































Total 


9 


3 


17 


11 


44 


107 


11 


11 


36 


61 


5 


305* 







* Of this total 230 fatalities were reported by the various provincial Workmen's Compensation Boards and the Board 
of Transport Commissioners; details of the remaining 75 were obtained from other non-official sources. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7967 






ABOUR 
AZETTE 




Employment in Canada in 1960 {page 114) 



Published Monthly by the 

ARTMENT OF LABOUR 

CANADA 



FEBRUARY 28, 1961 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 

Circulation Manager 



J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
National Film Board 



Vol. LXI, No. 2 CONTENTS February 28, 1961 

Employment Review 97 

Collective Bargaining Review 103 

Notes of Current Interest 1 09 

House of Commons Debates of Labour Interest: A Guide . . 112 

Employment in Canada in 1960 114 

Special Report, Unemployment Insurance Advisory Committee 122 

5th Annual Convention, Ouebec Federation of Labour 130 

16th Convention, Professional Association of Industrialists . . 135 

National Business Conference on Employment 137 

Labour Legislation in the Past Decade— III 140 

White House Conference on Aging 147 

Vocational Training for Girls 148 

50 Years Ago This Month 149 

International Labour Organization: 

Social Consequences of Coal-Mining Crisis 150 

Teamwork in Industry 152 

Industrial Relations: 

Certification Proceedings 153 

Conciliation Proceedings 155 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 158 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 163 

Annual Report of U.K. Inspector of Factories 165 

Unemployment Insurance: 

Monthly Report on Operation 169 

Decisions of the Umpire 170 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 172 

Prices and the Cost of Living 178 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library 1 80 

Labour Statistics 183 



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Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa. 



EMPLOYMENT REVIEW 



ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH BRANCH 



Employment and Unemployment, January 

Employment declined seasonally between December and January but 
continued higher than a year earlier. The month-to-month decline was 199,000; 
the year-to-year increase was 47,000. Unemployment rose by 165,000 during 
the month, and in January was 146,000 higher than a year earlier. 

The labour force was 3.1 per cent higher than a year earlier, a substantially 
greater increase than the 0.8-per-cent increase in employment. The number of 
women employed increased by 101,000 over the year while the number of men 
employed dropped 54,000. 

In the week ended January 14, the labour force was estimated at 6,396,000, 
which was 34,000 lower than in the preceding month but 193,000 higher than 
a year earlier. Employment was estimated at 5,703,000, unemployment at 
693,000. 

Employment 

The greater part of the December-to- January employment decline was the 
product of seasonal factors, and about 85 per cent of it was accounted for by 
men. 

Construction and trade shared about equally in the decrease, and together 
they accounted for about 60 per cent of the net change in employment over 
the month. Most of the remainder was in forestry, agriculture and services. 
Employment declines in the trade and service industries stemmed in part from 
the release of temporary workers hired for the Christmas season. Forestry 
activities decreased a little more than is customary for this time of year. In other 
seasonal industries employment declined by about the usual amount. 

At an estimated 5,703,000, employment in January was 47,000 higher 
than a year earher. Continuing strength of the service industry outweighed 
decreases in the goods-producing industries. The most significant year-to-year 
dechnes were in construction and durable goods manufacturing. 

Of the estimated 5,703,000 employed in January, 4,094,000 were men 
and 1,609,000 women. In the preceding month the figures were 5,902,000 
employed, 4,246,000 men and 1,656,000 women. In January 1960, employ- 
ment was 5,656,000; men, 4,148,000; women, 1,508,000. 

Non-agricultural employment in January was estimated at 5,118,000, 
employment in agriculture at 585,000. The December-to- January employment 
decline in forestry was heavily concentrated in Quebec; most of the drop in 
agriculture took place in Ontario. The construction and trades industries released 
workers in all five regions. 

Employment dechned in all regions from December to January but only in 
Ontario was the January total lower than in January 1960. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 97 

92006-6—1 



: -j;-ija«5 

LABOUR FORCE TRENDS - CANADA 
JULY 1958 TO DATE 



•a 



•Original data ^ 



Saasonally adjusted 




Unemployment 

Unemployment increased by 165,000 
between December and January. About 
87 per cent of the unemployed were men, 
the same proportion as in the preceding 
month. 

The 693,000 unemployed in January 
included 63,000 on temporary layoff. Of 
the remaining 630,000 who were seeking 
work, 71 per cent had been unemployed 
for three months or less, 18 per cent for 
four to six months, and 11 per cent for 
seven months or more. 

Unemployment in January was 10.8 
per cent of the labour force, compared 
with 8.8 per cent a year earlier and 9.5 
per cent in January 1959. 

Of the total unemployed, almost 
one third had been employed in con- 
struction and about the same proportion 
in various service-producing industries. 
Most of the remaining unemployed had 
been employed in manufacturing and 
forestry. 



Regional Summaries 

Employment declined seasonally in the Atlantic region between December 
and January; construction and retail trade accounted for most of the decrease. 
Operations in the coal mining industry continued to be sporadic, three of the 
collieries in the Sydney area being closed for part of the month. Workers 
were being re-hired during the month for log-hauling in Newfoundland, but 
there were offsetting decreases in forestry employment in New Brunswick, 
where hauling operations were nearing completion. Shipbuilding activity 
increased between December and January while iron and steel plants registered 
partly offsetting employment declines. 

The region's labour force was estimated at 565,000 in January, a decrease 
of 13,000 from the December estimate of 578,000 but an increase of 24,000 
from the January 1960 estimate. 

Employment was estimated at 481,000, a drop of 28,000 from December 
but a gain of 18,000 from January 1960. Unemployment totalled 84,000, 
slightly higher than the year-earlier figure and 15,000 higher than the total in 
December. 

Non-farm employment in the region in January was 434,000, down 25,000 
from December; but it was 3.8 per cent (16,000) higher than a year earlier, 
largely as a result of expansion of the service-producing industries. Employment 
in shipbuilding, iron and steel, and pulp and paper manufacturing was con- 
siderably higher than a year earlier but the construction and transportation 
industries were operating at lower levels. 

Unemployment in January rose to 14.9 per cent of the labour force. In 
January last year it amounted to 14.4 per cent of the labour force. 



98 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



Employment in Quebec declined more than seasonally between December 
and January. Virtually all of the dechne occurred in non-agricultural industries 
as cold weather sharply reduced construction activities. 

Manufacturing employment continued to decrease, primarily because of 
declines in iron and steel products, transportation equipment and electrical 
apparatus. Production and employment in structural steel and aircraft and parts, 
however, remained high. Food processing decUned seasonally. Residential and 
municipal construction continued at a high level for this time of year. In forestry, 
considerable re-hiring took place as log-hauling operations got under way, after 
an employment decline in the first half of the month. 

The region's labour force contracted from an estimated 1,805,000 in 
December to an estimated 1,793,000 in January but was 55,000 larger than 
in January 1960. Employment was estimated at 1,544,000, down 78,000 from 
the December estimate but up shghtly from the year-earlier figure. Non- 
agricultural employment increased fractionally over the year as increases in 
service-producing industries more than offset a dechne in manufacturing. The 
Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program and residential construction also 
contributed to the maintenance of employment at a level above last year's. The 
continuing year-to-year dechne in manufacturing was due mainly to weaknesses 
in the capital-goods industries. 

Unemployment, at an estimated 249,000 in January, amounted to 13.9 
per cent of the labour force compared with 11.5 per cent a year earlier. 

Employment in the Ontario region decreased 52,000 between December 
and January. This larger-than-usual decrease occurred mainly among men. 
Employment was reduced in the construction industry as cold weather slowed 
down work on many projects. As is usual at this time of year, many women were 
released from retail trade after the Christmas rush, and seasonal layoffs occurred 
in distilleries and breweries. There were also some layoffs in rubber and textile 
plants and in the secondary iron and steel industry. 

In primary steel plants employment was fairly stable, though somewhat 
lower than a year earlier. In automobile and parts plants, and in tobacco and 
food processing, employment continued at high levels; in the aircraft industry 
it remained higher than a year ago. Of the industries in which employment 
and production had dropped greatly in recent months, shipyards and the 
manufacture of agricultural implements and locomotives showed some improve- 
ment. Reduced employment levels persisted, however, in the manufacture of 
earth-moving equipment and heavy electrical goods. 

In forestry, favourable weather permitted hauling operations to get into 
full swing and some cutting to be continued. Apart from the gradual shutdown 
of uranium mines, activity in mining continued steady. 

The labour force in region was 55,000 larger than in January 1960; 
employment was 4,000 less and unemployment 59,000 more than a year earlier. 
The number of men employed was lower than a year eariier, particularly in 
agriculture, construction and durable goods manufacturing. In the year, the 
number of women employed increased substantially, mainly in the rapidly 
expanding service industry. 

Unemployment in the region increased some 49,000 during the month, to 
202,000. This represented 8.5 per cent of the labour force compared with 6.2 
per cent a year earUer. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 99 

92006-6—14 



In the Prairie region, the seasonal decline in employment continued. In 
spite of generally mild weather, which made possible a high level of outdoor 
work for this time of year, building activity nevertheless contracted sharply 
and a large number of carpenters and other construction workers were laid off. 
The work force was reduced in a number of coal mines several weeks earher 
than usual because of the mild weather. Employment in trade fell off seasonally. 
Some weakness was apparent in manufacturmg, mamly in packing plants and 
in kon and steel plants other than those producing large-diameter pipe. In 
agriculture, services and mining, employment remained fahly steady. 

The labour force in the region, estimated at 1,086,000 in January, was 
only slightly smaller than in December but 37,000 larger than a year ago. 
Employment in January, at 1,005,000, was 22,000 higher than in January 
1960. It was lower than a year earher in almost all goods-producing industries 
except agriculture; the greatest decrease was in construction. Year-to-year 
increases in trade, services and public utilities employment, however, offset these 
losses. 

Unemployment continued to increase. At 81,000, it represented 7.5 per 
cent of the labour force in January compared with 6.3 per cent in the first 
month of 1960. 

Employment continued to decline in the Pacific region from December to 
January but the change was somewhat less than in most recent years. In spite 
of heavy rains, conditions in the woods were generally favourable for logging 
and lumbering, and considerable numbers of workers were re-hired. The usual 
seasonal employment reductions occurred in construction and trade, and much 
of the fishing fleet was tied up for the winter. Employment levels remained high 
in water transportation and held steady in mining and smelting. Little change 
occurred in agriculture. 

The region's labour force was unchanged at 580,000 between December 
and January; this estimate was 22,000 higher than in January 1960. Employ- 
ment, at an estimated 503,000, was down from the 517,000 in December but up 
from the 498,000 in January 1960. Some increases from a year earlier in farm 
and services employment offset declines in construction that resulted from a 
heavy fall-out in housebuilding. In manufacturing, most iron and steel products 
estabhshments employed fewer workers than a year earlier, but pulp and paper 
mills and manufacturers of other paper products showed substantial gains. In 
transportation, railway employment in January was a little lower than last year 
but the number working on the waterfront and in other jobs associated with the 
deep-sea shipping industry was higher. 

Unemployment was 13.3 per cent of the labour force in January, 10.8 per 
cent in January 1960. 

LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate 
Balance 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 




January 
1961 


January 
1960 


January 
1961 


January 
1960 


January 
1961 


January 
1960 


Metropolitan 


11 
21 
11 
49 


10 

18 
8 
46 


1 
5 
3 

8 


2 
8 
6 
11 


















Minor 


1 


1 






Total 


92 


82 


'' 


27 


1 


1 







100 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-JANUARY 1961 





SUBSTANTIAL 


MODERATE 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 




LABOUR SURPLUS 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




Calgary 


Ottawa-Hull 








Edmonton 










HALIFAX -< 










Hamilton 








METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Montreal 
Quebec- Levis 
St. John's 








(labour force 75.000 or more) 










TORONTO -< — 










Vancouver-New Westminster 










Windsor-Leamington 










Winnipeg 










Brantford 


Kingston 








Corner Brook 


London 








Cornwall 


Saint John 








Farnham-Granby 


Sudbury 








GUELPH -< — 


Victoria 








Fort William-Port Arthur 










Joliette 










KITCHENER -< — 










Lac St. Jean 








MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 


Moncton 








(labour force 25.000-75.000: 60 


New Glasgow 








per cent or more in non-agri- 


Niagara Peninsula 








cultural activity) 


OSHAWA -<— 

Peterborough 

Rouyn-Val d'Or 

Sarnia 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Sydney 

TIMMINS-KIRKLAND 


















LAKE -^— 










Trois Rivieres 










Barrie 


Moose Jaw 








BRANDON -< — 


North Battleford 








Charlottetown 


Regina 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 
AREAS 


CHATHAM -< — 
LETHBRIDGE -< — 








Oabour force 25,000-75.000; 40 


Prince Albert 

RED DFER -^ 








per cent or more agricultural) 


Riviere du Loup 
SASKATOON -< — 
Thetford-Megantic-St. Georges 
Yorkton 










Bathurst 


DRUMHELLER .< — 


Kitimat 






Beauharnois 


Gait 








BELLEVILLE- 


Kamloops 








TRENTON -<-— 


Medicine Hat 








Bracebridge 


St. Thomas 








BRAMPTON -<-— 


Stratford 








Bridgewater 


Swift Current 








Campbellton 


Woodstock- 








CENTRAL VANCOUVER 


Tillsonburg 








ISLAND -^— 










Chilliwack 










Cranbrook 










Dauphin 










DAWSON CREEK -<— 










Drummondville 










Edmundston 










FREDERICTON -<~ 










Gaspe 








MINOR AREAS 


GODERICH -< — 








(labour force 10.000-25.000) 


Grand Falls 














Kentville 
LACHUTE-STE. 


Group I Concluded 








THERESE -< — 


ST. HYACINTHE-<-- 








LINDSAY -< — 


ST. JEAN -< — 








LISTOWEL -< — 


St. Stephen 








Montmagny 


Sault Ste. Marie 








Newcastle 


SIMCOE -<— 








North Bay 


Sorel 








Okanagan Valley 
Owen Sound 


Summerside 








TRAIL-NELSON ^— 








Pembroke 


Truro 








Portage la Prairie 


Valleyfield 








Prince George-Quesnel 


Victoriaville 








Prince Rupert 


WALKERTON -< — 
WEYBURN ^— 








Quebec North Shore 
Rimouski 








Woodstock 








Ste. Agathe-St. Jerome 


Yarmouth 







■ — ^The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 
moved. For an explanation of the classification system used, see page 933. September 1 950 iss ue. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



101 



Current Labour Statistics 

(Latest available statistics as of February 17, 1961) 



Principal Items 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (in thousands) 

Employed (in thousands) 

Agriculture (in thousands) 

Non-agriculture (in thousands) 

Paid Workers (in thousands) 

At work 35 hours or more. ... (in thousands) 
At work less than 35 hours... . (in thousands) 
Employed but not at work ... (in thousands) 

Unemployed (in thousands) 

Atlantic (in thousands) 

Quebec (in thousands) 

Ontario (in thousands) 

Prairie (in thousands) 

Pacific (in thousands) 

Without work and seeking work (in thousands) 
On temporary layoff up to 
30 days (in thousands) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 
Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) . 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 



Date 



Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan, 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 

Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 

Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 14 

Jan. 14 

Jan. 14 

November 
November 

Year 1960 
Year 1960 



January 
January 
January 



November 
November 
November 
November 
January 

November 
November 



December 
December 
December 
December 



Amount 



6,396 
5,703 
585 
5,118 
4,654 

N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 

693 

84 

249 

202 

81 

77 

630 

63 

119.8 
108.2 

104,111 
53,573 



21 

2,346 

28,140 



$76.43 

$ 1.79 

40.6 

$79.14 

129.2 

134.6 
1,556 



160.1 
140.0 
134.8 
144.5 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous Previous 
Month Year 



0.5 
3.4 
4.1 
3.3 
3.7 

N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 

31.3 
21.7 
36.1 
32.0 
35.0 
22.2 



28. 



61.5 



- 1 

- 1 



- 27.6 
+ 24.1 

- 7.1 



0.2 
0.6 
0.3 
0.2 
0.3 

0.2 
1.7 



6.7 



3.1 
• 0.8 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 

N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 



+ 25.0 

+ 46.5 

- 1.7 

- 2.2 



2.6 
0.1 



5.0 
33.6 
51.9 



3.0 
2.9 
0.7 
3.0 
1.3 

1.1 
3.0 



- 1.5 

- 2.2 

- 5.5 

+ 0.6 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from Labour 
Force, a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. See also page 983, September 1960 
issue. 



102 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REVIEW 



ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH BRANCH 



Following passage of the Railway Oper- 
ation Continuation Act last December there 
had been no evidence of any progress 
toward settlement of the dispute between 
the railways and the non-operating unions. 
In response to an appeal by the Prime 
Minister for a resumption of negotiations, 
the parties met in Montreal in mid-Feb- 
ruary, but very little was accomplished. The 
unions restated their position that the 
settlement should be based on the concilia- 
tion board's recommendations for a 14-cent- 
an-hour increase; the companies continued 
to maintain that it was financially impos- 
sible for them to meet this demand. 

Closely linked Vv'ith this dispute was the 
settlement between Eastern Canada Steve- 
doring and the Railway Clerks. The new 
agreement between these parties specifies 
that it would incorporate the same terms 
regarding wages, vacations and duration 
of agreement as those that will eventually 
be agreed upon by the railways and the 
non-operating unions. 

Less than three months after signing a 
new agreement with the Winnipeg Cloak 
Manufacturers' Association that bound 800 
employees to existing wage rates for another 
two years, the International Ladies' Garment 
Workers' Union reopened negotiations and 
worked out a new agreement that reduced 
the contract term to one year and increased 
the bonus on earnings by 3^ per cent. Last 
October, when the union sought to open 
negotiations for a collective agreement, it 
was confronted with a letter written by 
the former manager of the union's Winnipeg 
local. The letter, written without the 
knowledge of the International executive 
or the local membership and filed with the 
employers' group sometime before the 
manager's sudden death last June, approved 
a two-year wage freeze for the Winnipeg 
garment workers. Evidently it was the 
manager's belief that lower wage rates in 
Winnipeg would create a competitive advan- 
tage for the local garment industry and that 
the resultant increase in business would 
avert layoffs. The union originally agreed 
to honour this letter and signed an agree- 
ment accordingly. However, after a review 
of the matter by International President 
David Dubinsky, the letter was ruled invalid 
on the ground that it had not been 
approved by the membership. In the new 
negotiations that followed, a one-year agree- 



ment was signed. It provides for the con- 
tinuation of the 37^-hour work week, and 
a wage increase in the form of an additional 
3^-per-cent bonus on regular earnings. 

The first step toward opening negotia- 
tions for the renewal of the one-year agree- 
ment between the Ontario Hydro Electric 
Power Commission and the National Union 
of Public Service Employees was taken at the 
end of January when the parties exchanged 
bargaining agendas. The 9,500-member 
union submitted a 69-item agenda, which 
was countered by 40 items from the Com- 
mission. The union proposed that the one- 
year agreement provide a general wage 
increase of 6 per cent for tradesmen, 
operators and weekly salaried employees, as 
well as special increases for workers at the 
new nuclear generating plant at Rolphton, 
Ont. Other items requested included im- 
proved vacation allowances and amendments 
to the pension plan and other fringe benefits. 
The Commission's agenda reportedly did 
not include a wage offer. It proposed drop- 
ping operators into a lower classification, 
changing the grievance procedure and chang- 
ing the seniority clause to have seniority 
applied only when abilities were equal. 

Major Settlements in 1960 

Appearing on next page are two tables, 
one showing the wage settlements in agree- 
ments signed during the last six months of 
1960, and the second showing wage settle- 
ments during the entire year. A total of 
173 major collective agreements covering 
approximately 268,000 workers were nego- 
tiated and signed in Canada during 1960. 
Slightly more than 60 per cent of these 
agreements were for terms of approximately 
two to three years, with the two-year 
settlements predominating. 

One half of the major collective agree- 
ments signed during 1960 covered 115,000 
workers employed in the manufacturing 
sector of the economy. The largest number 
of these settlements was in the paper prod- 
ucts industry, where 18 major agreements 
were signed with various pulp and paper 
firms across the country. Three of these 
agreements, signed for a one-year term 
and covering more than 6,000 paper mill 
employees in British Columbia, provided 
increases in the base rates in the range 
from 5 to 9.9 cents an hour. Most of the 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



103 



WAGE SETTLEMENTS DURING THE SECOND HALF OF 1960 

Collective agreements covering 500 or more workers concluded between July 1 and December 31, 1960, excluding 
agreements in the construction industry and agreements with wage terms in piece rates only. 



Total Wage 

Increase in Cents 

per Hour* 




Term of Agreement in 


Months 




Under 15 


15-20 


21-26 


27-32 


33 and over 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 





2 

2 

20 

1 
6 

1 


1,250 

15,000 

51,540 

540 

7,100 

2,500 






1 


1,400 










1 — 4 9 














5 — 9 9 






9 
11 
9 

4 


12.830 
15,450 
12,360 
8,390 










10 0—14 9 






2 


1.120 


3 
2 
2 
2 


3,250 


15 0—19 9 


1 


950 


1,180 


20 — 24 9 






2 650 


25 0—29 9 










12,900 


30 and over. 




















Total 


32 


77,930 


1 


950 


34 


50,430 


2 


1,120 


9 


19,980 







ers 



♦Wage increases shown relate to base rates only. Data on employees covered are approximate and relate to all work- 
covered by the agreement. 



remaining agreements in the industry were 
signed with paper companies in eastern 
Canada and provided increases in the base 
rates in the range from 15 to 19.9 cents 
an hour over the one-year term. More than 
12,000 workers were affected by seven major 
settlements in the textile products industry. 
Nearly all these agreements provided wage 
increases in the range from 10 to 14.9 cents 
an hour over a two-year period. Also in 
manufacturing, approximately 18,500 cloth- 
ing workers were affected by settlements 
signed during the year. Some of these settle- 
ments provided for a gradual reduction in 
the work week to 36 hours, as well as a 
wage increase. One agreement in the cloth- 
ing industry, affecting 1,400 workers, ex- 
tended existing terms without change. 

The service industry sector ranked second 
to manufacturing in the number of new 
major agreements signed during 1960. Of 
23 such agreements, 17 provided wage in- 
creases for nearly 33,000 provincial and 
municipal employees and 5 raised the wage 
rates for 42,000 non-professional workers 
in various hospitals across Canada. 



There were 12 collective agreements 
signed during the year that affected approx- 
imately 41,000 workers in the communica- 
tion industry. More than half of these 
workers were employees of the Bell Tele- 
phone Company, who received increases 
ranging from 1 to 9 cents an hour in the 
four contracts covering the various cate- 
gories of workers. 

In the mining industry, 18,000 workers 
were covered by the 16 major agreements 
signed during the year. For two thirds of 
these settlements, wage increases in the 
range from 5 to 9.9 cents an hour over a 
two-year term were granted to some 9,000 
workers in asbestos, uranium and copper 
mines. In Alberta, 2,000 coal miners were 
given increases ranging from 10 to 14.7 
cents an hour over two years. The Maritime 
coal miners, however, were still negotiating 
for a new agreement to replace the one that 
terminated in December 1959. Consequently, 
about 7,000 coal miners were working under 
the terms of the 1959 agreement that had 
been extended on a month-to-month basis 
over the past year. 



WAGE SETTLEMENTS DURING 1960 

Collective agreements covering 500 or more workers concluded between January 1 and December 31, 1960, excluding 
agreements in the construction industry and agreements with wage terms in piece rates only. 



Total Wage 

Increase in Cents 

per Hour* 






Term of Agreement in 


Months 








Under 15 


15-20 


21-26 


27-32 


33 and over 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 


Agts. 


Empls. 





6 
6 

32 
3 

14 

1 


3,800 
18,520 
62.690 

3,540 
20,760 

2.500 






1 


1,400 










0.1— 4.9 














5.0— 9 9 


1 


1,900 


27 

31 

18 

8 


29,560 
46,520 
28,930 
12,270 






5 

4 
5 

1 

4 


750 


10.0—14.9 


2 


1,120 


4.550 


15.0—19.9 


1 


950"- 


2 850 


20.0—24 9 


1 


2,180 


5 870 


25.0—29.9 






2,000 












1 


700 






14,280 
















Total 


62 


111,810 


2 


2,850 


86 


119,380 


3 


3,300 


20 


30,300 







*Wage increases shown relate to base rates only. Data on employees covered are approximate and relate to all work- 
ers covered by the agreement. 



104 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more workers, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During February, March and April 

(except those under negotiation in January) 

Company and Location Union 

Abitibi Paper, Iroquois Falls, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mm Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Abitibi Paper, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mm Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Anglo-Cdn. Paper, Forestvme, Que Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Anglo-Cdn. Paper, Quebec, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Atomic Energy of Can., Chalk River, Ont Atomic Energy Allied Council (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 
Bowater's Mersey Paper, Liverpool, N.S Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Can. Iron Foundries, Three Rivers, Que Moulders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.B.C., company-wide Radio & T.V. Empl. (ARTEC) (Ind.) 

C.N.R. Atlantic & Central regions Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.N.R. Atlantic & Central regions Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

C.N.R. Prairie & Pacific regions Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

CNR. Prairie & Pacific regions Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 

C.P.R. Prairie & Pacific regions Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. General Electric, Montreal & Quebec, Que. LU.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. International Paper, N.B., Que. & Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mm Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & Oper. Engi- 
neers (AFL-CIO) 

Collingwood Shipyards, Collingwood, Ont CLC-chartered local 

Consolidated Paper, Grand'Mere, Que Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Port Alfred, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Consolidated Paper, Shawinigan, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mm Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Engineering Works, Lachine, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dunlop Canada, Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dunlop Canada, Whitby, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fisheries Assoc, B.C Native Brotherhood (Ind.) (cannery wkrs.) 

Fisheries Assoc, B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) (cannery wkrs.) 

Fisheries Assoc, B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) (tendermen) 

Great Lakes Paper, Fort Wmiam, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Halifax City, N.S Public Empl. (CLC) (inside wkrs.) 

Hamilton City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (office wkrs.) 

Hammon City, Ont Public Service Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Howard Smith Paper, Cornwall, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Hudson Bay Mining, Flin Flon, Man CLC-chartered local. Machinists (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) & others 

Kellogg Company, London, Ont Mmers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kimberley-Clark Paper, Terrace Bay, Ont I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC), & Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mm Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & I.B.E.W. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

MacDonald Tobacco, Montreal, Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marathon Corp. of Can., Marathon, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

New Brunswick Power Commission, province-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario Hydro, company-wide Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Ontario Paper, Thorold, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Price Bros., Kenogami & Riverbend, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Province of Saskatchewan Sask. Civil Service (CLC) (labour services) 

Provincial Paper, Thorold, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Que. North Shore Paper, Bale Comeau, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

R.C.A. Victor, Montreal, Que I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Corp., Red Rock, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 105 

92006-6—2 



Company and Location Union 

St. Lawrence Corp., Three Rivers, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mm Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Sangamo Company, Leaside, Ont Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Silverwood Dairies, Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Spruce Falls & Kimberley-Clark, Kapuskasing, 

Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

MUl Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

T.C.A., company-wide Air Line Pilots (Ind.) 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During January * 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Assoc, des Marchands Detaillants (Produits 

Alimentaires), Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Association Patronale du Commerce, (Hard- 
ware), Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Auto dealers (various), Vancouver, B.C Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.A. Oil, Clarkson, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Babcock-Wilcox & Goldie McCuUoch, Gait, Ont. Nat. Council of Cdn. Labour (Ind.) 

Beatty Bros., Fergus, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Calgary Power, Calgary, Alta Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) 

Cdn. Vickers (Engineering Div.), Montreal, Que. Boilermakers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Machinists 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Canadian Vickers, Montreal, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Can. Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que RaUway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.B.C., company-wide Broadcast Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Tube & Steel, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Westinghouse, Hamilton, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

C.P.R. Atlantic & Central regions Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.P.R. Prairie & Pacific regions Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.P.R., company-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) (dining car staff) 

Dominion Coal, Sydney, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dominion Glass, Wallaceburg, Ont Glass & Ceramic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Rubber (Rubber Div.), St. Jerome, Que. CLC-chartered local 

Dosco Fabrication Divs., Trenton, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

DuPont of Can., Kingston, Ont Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dupuis Freres, Montreal, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Edmonton City, Alta I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta .' Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Employing Printers' Assoc, Montreal, Que Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Employing Printers' Assoc, Montreal, Que Printing Pressmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fairey Aviation, Eastern Passage, N.S Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Firestone Tire & Rubber, Hamilton, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Food stores (various), Winnipeg, Man Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, New Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

H. J. Heinz, Leamington, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hollinger Mines, Timmins, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lakehead Term. Elevators Assoc, Fort William, 

Ont Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marme Industries, Sorel, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Mclntyre Porcupine Mines, Schumaker, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Miner Rubber, Granby, Que Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Moirs Limited, Halifax, N.S Teamsters (Ind.) & Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Montreal City, Que Public Service Empl. (CLC) (manual wkrs.) 

Northern Electric, Belleville, Ont Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) (plant wkrs.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) (phone installers & plant 

wkrs.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Office Empl. Assoc. (Ind.) 

Old Sydney Collieries, Sydney Mines, N.S Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Prov. Hospitals, Weyburn, North Battleford, 

Moose Jaw, Sask Public Service Empl. (CLC) & CLC-chartered 

local 

Quebec City, Que Municipal and School Empl. (Ind.) (inside 

wkrs.) 
Que. North Shore Paper, Baie Comeau, Franklin, 

Shelter Bay, Que Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rock City Tobacco, Quebec, Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

106 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



Company and Location Union 

St. Boniface General Hospital, St. Boniface, Man. Empl. Union of Hospital Inst. (Ind.) 

Saguenay Terminals, Port Alfred, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Sask. Govt. Telephone, province-wide Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Scarborough Township, Ont. Public Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Shipping Federation of Can., Halifax, N.S., Saint 

John, N.B., Quebec, Montreal, Three Rivers, 

Que I.L.A. (CLC) 

Singer Manufacturing, St. Jean, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Telegram, Toronto, Ont Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside wkrs.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside wkrs.) 

Vancouver Police Commissioners Bd., B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg City, Man Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Aluminum Co., He Maligne, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Aluminum Co., Kingston, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Aluminum Co., Shawinigan, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Association Patronale des Mfrs. de Chaussures, 

Quebec, Que Leather & Shoe Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

B.C. Hotels Assoc, New Westminster, Burnaby, 

Eraser Valley, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Hotels Assoc, Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (beverage dis- 
pensers) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Calgary City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (outside wkrs.) 

Cdn. Car & Foundry, Montreal, Que Railway Carmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. General Electric, Toronto, Peterborough & 

Guelph, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

Cdn. Lithographers Assoc, eastern Canada Lithographers (CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Cap de la Madeleine & 

Three Rivers, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Ste-Anne de Portneuf, Que. Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

G. T. Davie & Sons, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Davie Shipbuilding, Lauzon, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Fittings Limited, Oshawa, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hopital Hotel-Dieu, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Hospitals (six), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Imperial Tobacco & subsidiaries, Ont. & Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marathon Corp., Port Arthur, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Outboard Marine, Peterborough, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rowntree Co., Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Railway, Transport and General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Board 

Aluminum Co., Arvida, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Canada Paper, Windsor Mills, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. British Aluminum, Bale Comeau, Que Metal Trades' Federation (CNTU) 

Canadian Car, Fort William, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Oilcloth & Linoleum, Montreal, Que CNTU-chartered local 

Goodyear Cotton, St. Hyacinthe, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Halifax Shipyards (Dosco), Halifax & Dart- 
mouth, N.S Marine Wkrs. (CLC) 

Hotel Royal York (CPR), Toronto, Ont Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Page-Hersey Tubes, Welland, Ont U.E. (Ind.) 

St. Lawrence Corp., East Angus, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

T.C.A., company-wide Air Line Flight Attendants (CLC) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

C.B.C., company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., C.P.R., other railways 15 unions (non-operating empl.) 

Hotel Mount Royal, Montreal, Que Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern Interior Lumbermen's Assoc, B.C Woodworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 107 

92006-6—24 



Arbitration 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. (Ind.) (outside 

wkrs.) 

Work Stoppage 

♦Shipbuilders (various), Vancouver & Victoria, 
B.C Shipyard Wkrs. (CLC) 



* Strike called at Burrard Drydock, Vancouver, only; Yarrows & Victoria Machinery in 
Victoria continued negotiations. 

Part III— Settlements Reached During January 

(A summary of the major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures 
for the number of workers covered are approximate.) 

Abitibi Power & Paper, Port Arthur, Ont. — Carpenters ( AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agree- 
ment covering 2,000 empl. — increases for hourly rated empl. of 7<ji-an-hr. retroactive to Sept. 1, 
1960, plus 5^ eff. March 1, 1961; increases for piece-rate wkrs. of 2% retroactive to Sept. 1, 1960 
plus 1% eff. March 1, 1961; on Sept. 1, 1961 work wk. to be reduced from 48 hrs. to 44 hrs. 
with 60% of pay maintenance. 

C.I.L. (Ammunition Div.), Brownsburg, Que. — Mine Wkrs. (Ind.): 2-yr. agreement 
covering 650 empl. — 3% increase efif. Jan. 12, 1961; an additional 5^-an-hr. eff. Jan. 12, 1962. 

Ladies' Cloak & Suit Mfrs., Assoc, Winnipeg, Man. — Ladies' Garment Wkrs. (AFL- 
CIO/CLC): 1-yr. agreement covering 800 empl. — 3i% increase eff. Jan. 31, 1961; work wk. 
reduced to 37i hrs. eff. Dec. 1, 1960. 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont. — Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) : 1-yr. agreement covering 750 empl. — ^base rates increased 6i an hr. retroactive 
to June 1, 1960; an additional 5^-an-hr. retroactive to Dec. 1, 1960 plus 5^ eff. Jan. 1, 1961; 
3 wks. vacation after 12 yrs. of service (previously 3 wks. after 15 yrs.); increased company 
contribution to hospitalization fund; provisions for bereavement leave. 

Eastern Can. Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S. — Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) : new agree- 
ment covering 800 empl. — terms of settlement finally agreed to between non-operating unions 
and the railways regarding wages, vacations and duration of agreement will be applied to this 
agreement; effective dates of changes in wages and vacations will be same as the non-operating 
settlement; a contributory pension plan introduced eff. Jan. 1, 1961 and will be considered as a 
non-negotiable item. 

Great Lakes Paper, Fort William, Ont. — Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement 
covering 1,000 empl. — 7^ an hr. retroactive to Sept. 1, 1960 plus 5d an hr. eff. March 1, 1961 
for hourly rated empl.; 2% retroactive to Sept. 1, 1960, plus an additional 1% eff. March 1, 1961 
for piece-rate empl.; on Sept. 1, 1961 work wk. will be reduced from 48 hrs. to 44 hrs. with 
60% of pay maintenance. 

Kimberley-Clark & Spruce Falls Paper, Kapuskasing & Longlac, Ont. — Carpenters 
(AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 1,940 empl. — 1^ an hr. retroactive to Sept. 1, 1960, 
plus 50 an hr. eff. March 1, 1961 for hourly rated empl.; 2% retroactive to Sept. 1, 1960, plus 
1% eff. March 1, 1961 for piece-rate empl.; on Sept. 1, 1961 work wk. will be reduced from 48 
hrs. to 44 hrs. with 60% of pay maintenance. 

Montreal City, Que. — CNTU-chartered local (office wtcrs.): 2-yr. agreement covering 
4,000 empl. — 9% increase retroactive to Dec. 1, 1960 plus an additional 3% eff. Dec. 1, 1961; 
the 15-day annual sick leave entitlement to become cumulative without ceiling and payable in its 
entirety when the empl. leaves; bereavement leave abolished but empl. may use sick leave credit in 
cases of death or marriage in family. 

Montreal City, Que. — Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 1,850 
empl. — annual salaries increased by $100 retroactive to Dec. 1, 1960; an additional $50-a-yr. 
increase eff. Dec. 1, 1961 and a further $50 increase eff. May 1, 1962; work wk. reduced from 
56 hrs. to 42 hrs. eff. at the termination of the agreement, Nov. 30, 1962; 4 wks. vacation after 
25 yrs. of service (previously no provision for 4 wks. vacation); a $2,000 life insurance policy 
to be paid by the city; service pay similar to that provided for city policemen. 

Northern Forest Products, Port Arthur, Ont. — Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. 
agreement covering 500 empl. — increases for hourly rated empl. of 10 an hr. retroactive to Sept. 
1, 1960 plus 5(J an hr. eff. March 1, 1961; increases for piece-rate wkrs. of 2% retroactive 
to Sept. 1, 1960 plus 1% eff. March 1, 1961; on Sept. 1, 1961 work wk. to be reduced from 
48 hrs. to 44 hrs. with 60% of pay maintenance. 

St. Lawrence Corp., Nipigon, Ont. — Carpenters (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement 
covering 800 empl. — increases for hourly rated empl. of 70 an hr. retroactive to Sept. 1, 1960 
plus 50 an hr. eff. March 1, 1961; increases for piece-rate wkrs. of 2% retroactive to Sept. 1, 
1960 plus 1% eff. March 1, 1961; on Sept. 1, 1961 work wk. to be reduced from 48 hrs. 
to 44 hrs. with 60% of pay maintenance. 

Shipbuilders (various), Vancouver & Victoria, B.C. — Various unions: 3-yr. agreement 
covering 500 empl. — 40-an-hr. increase eff. Jan. 15, 1961, an additional 40 an hr. Jan. 1, 1962 and 
a further 40 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1963; this agreement was accepted by 7 of the 17 unions that 
bargained jointly; the other 10, representing 200 workers, continued bargaining. 

108 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



mmigration, Housing, Exports and Imports in 1960 



Immigration — The number of immigrants 
to Canada during 1960 was slightly smaller 
than in the previous year, the Department 
of Citizenship and Immigration has an- 
nounced. There were 104,111 immigrants 
in 1960, compared with 106,928 in 1959. 

In the analysis by occupational group, 
the largest number of immigrants in 1960, 
as in the previous year, came under the 
classification, manufacturing, mechanical 
and construction, the total being 13,551. 
The other large groups were: service, 8,763; 
labourers, 7,482; professional, 7,436; cleri- 
cal, 5,860; agricultural, 5,321; and com- 
mercial, 2,008. 

A little more than half the immigrants, 
54,491, went to Ontario. Quebec got 23,774 
and British Columbia 10,120. Alberta and 
Manitoba got 6,949 and 4,337 respectively. 

Italians again made up the largest racial 
group with 21,308, while British immigrants 
came second with 20,853. 

Housing — Starts and completions of new 
dwelling units in 1960 were fewer than in 
1959, and fewer units were under construc- 
tion at year-end than a year earlier, the 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics reported last 
month. 

Starts in 1960 dropped to 108,858 units 
from 141,345 in 1959. 

Completions fell to 123,757 units from 
145,671. 

Units under construction at the end of 
the year declined to 65,773 from 81,905 at 
the same time in 1959. 

Foreign Trade — Canada's trade with other 
countries reached a new peak in 1960. 

Preliminary figures released last month 
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics show 
that Canada's foreign trade last year was 
valued at $10,891,100,000, an increase of 
2.3 per cent over the 1959 value of $10,- 
649,200,000. 

Exports in 1960 were valued at $5,395,- 
300,000, a rise of 5 per cent over the 
previous record, attained in 1959. 

Imports, at $5,495,800,000, were frac- 
tionally less than in 1959. 

The import balance, estimated at $100,- 
500,000, was reduced to slightly more than 
a quarter of the 1959 total and was the 
lowest since 1954. 



Farm Cash Income — ^Canadian farmers 
received $2,783,800,000 in 1960 from the 
sale of farm products, participation pay- 
ments on previous years' grain crops, net 
cash advances on farm-stored grains, and 
deficiency payments made under the present 
farm prices support program, the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics estimated last month. 

The estimate is almost unchanged from 
that of 1959 and compares with the record 
high estimate of $2,859,100,000 in 1952. 

In addition, farmers in the Prairie Prov- 
inces received about $77 million paid under 
the provisions of the Prairie Farm Assistance 
Act, Western Grain Producers' Acreage 
Payment Plan, and the Federal-Provincial 
Emergency Unthreshed Grain Assistance 
Policy. 

When these payments are added to the 
cash returns enumerated earlier, total cash 
returns to farmers from their farming 
operations amounted to nearly $2,861,000,- 
000. This estimate has been exceeded only 
twice, in 1952 when returns totalled $2,864,- 
300,000, and in 1958, when they reached 
the all-time high of $2,873,400,000. 



4,000 Apprentices Finish Training 
In 1959-60, Double 10 Years Ago 

The number of apprentices who success- 
fully completed their training rose from 
1,779 in 1950-51 to 4,004 in 1959-60, the 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics reported last 
month. During the latter year, 7,678 appren- 
tices registered with the provincial Depart- 
ments of Labour for the first time, while 
2,722 discontinued their training. 

Registrations of indentured apprentices 
with the provincial Departments of Labour 
at September 30, 1960 totalled 19,543, an 
increase of 5.1 per cent over the previous 
year, and an accumulated increase of 39.5 
per cent over 1955 and 114.1 per cent 
over 1950. 

The most popular trade was motor 
vehicle mechanics and repair, with 5,955 
apprentices in 1960, followed by construc- 
tion electricians, with 2,927; plumbers and 
pipefitters, with 2,399; and carpenters, with 
1,514. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



109 



Canadian Vessels Carried 88% 
Of Coastwise Cargoes in 1959 

Cargoes unloaded in coastwise shipping 
at Canadian ports totalled 39,698,650 tons 
in 1959, an increase of 2.4 per cent over 
the preceding year's 38,778,904 tons. 

Of the 1959 total, 88.7 per cent— 35,207,- 
820 tons — was carried by vessels of Cana- 
dian registry, 9.1 per cent — 3,629,388 tons — 
by vessels of United Kingdom registry. 
Vessels of Bahamas registry unloaded 170,- 
164 tons, and vessels of Bermuda registry 
unloaded 625,601 tons. 



The Quebec Throne Speech stated that, 
pending completion of a new labour code 
by the Superior Labour Council, measures 
to accelerate procedures before the Labour 
Relations Board would be introduced. 

Single copies of these reports may be 
obtained from: The Legislation Branch, 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 



Current Reports Are Available 
On Progress of Labour Bills 

The Department's Legislation Branch has 
begun issuing a series of mimeographed 
reports on labour bills introduced in Parlia- 
ment and the provincial Legislatures. 

The reports cover the provisions of each 
bill and follow its progress from the time 
the bill is introduced to the point where 
it receives Royal Assent or is dropped. 
These current reports are intended to pro- 
vide more up-to-date information than it 
is possible to give in the monthly issues of 
the Labour Gazette. At the close of the 
sessions the major developments of the 
year will be reported in a series of articles 
in the Labour Law section of the Labour 
Gazette. 

The first report of the present series 
is available now. 

At the fall sessions of Parliament and the 
Legislatures of New Brunswick, Ontario and 
Quebec, there were indications in the 
Speeches from the Throne that a number 
of bills of interest to labour would be 
introduced. Three of the federal Acts passed 
in December are summarized in the first 
report, the Railway Operation Continuation 
Act, the Technical and Vocational Training 
Assistance Act and the National Productiv- 
ity Council Act. According to the Speech 
from the Throne, legislation to amend the 
Unemployment Insurance Act and to require 
the disclosure of information by business 
and labour organizations in Canada con- 
trolled from outside Canada will be intro- 
duced. 

An Equal Pay Act was forecast in the 
New Brunswick Speech from the Throne, 
which also stated that a study of the Work- 
men's Compensation Act would be under- 
taken and that increased training facilities 
would be provided. 

In Ontario, it was announced that the 
special technical committee studying port- 
able pensions will make a report during 
this session of the Legislature. 



Blind, Disabled, Old Age Payments 
Rise in Fourth Quarter of 1960 

The numbers of persons receiving old 
age assistance, allowances under the Blind 
Persons Act, and allowances under the 
Disabled Persons Act all increased during 
the fourth quarter of 1960. 

Old Age Assistance — ^The number of 
persons receiving old age assistance in 
Canada increased from 99,454 at September 
30, 1960 to 100,577 at December 31, 1960. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the federal-provincial scheme totalled 
$7,736,244.59 for the quarter ended De- 
cember 31, 1960, compared with $7,674,- 
007.12 in the preceding quarter. Since the 
inception of the Act, the federal Govern- 
ment has contributed $212,461,822.15. 

At December 31, 1960, the average 
monthly assistance in the provinces ranged 
from $48.86 to $52.85, except in one 
province where the average was $46.57. In 
all provinces the maximum assistance paid 
was $55 a month. 

Blind Persons Allowances — The number 
of blind persons in Canada receiving allow- 
ances under the Blind Persons Act increased 
from 8,657 at September 30, 1960 to 8,665 
at December 31, 1960. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the federal-provincial scheme totalled 
$1,042,901.60 for the quarter ended Decem- 
ber 31, 1960, compared with $1,041,116.59 
in the preceding quarter. Since the inception 
of the Act, the federal Government has 
contributed $30,517,456.83. 

At December 31, 1960, the average 
monthly allowance in the provinces ranged 
from $50.39 to $54.01. In all provinces the 
maximum allowance paid was $55 a month. 

Disabled Persons Allowances — ^The num- 
ber of persons in Canada receiving allow- 
ances under the Disabled Persons Act 
increased from 50,525 at September 30, 
1960 to 50,627 at December 31, 1960. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the federal-provincial scheme totalled 
$4,102,681.16 for the quarter ended Decem- 
ber 31, 1960, compared with $4,090,541.09 
in the preceding quarter. Since the inception 
of the Act, the federal Government has 
contributed $68,017,447.70. 



110 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



At December 31, 1960, the average 
monthly allowance in the provinces ranged 
from $52.75 to $54.56. In all provinces 
the maximum allowance paid was $55 a 
month. 



Canadian Highway Safety Council Execu- 
tive and on the National Councils on 
Rehabilitation and Vocational Training. For 
many years he contributed the section on 
Canadian Labour to the Encyclopaedia 
Britannica Year Book. 



Norman S. Dowd Retires 
From Two CLC Positions 

Norman S. Dowd, for almost 40 years 
a leading figure in the Canadian labour 
movement, retired from the positions of 
Executive Secretary of the Canadian Labour 
Congress and Editor of Canadian Labour 
on December 31, 1960. Mr. Dowd was 71 
years old on December 28. 

Cliff Scotton, CLC Assistant Director of 
Public Relations, has succeeded Mr. Dowd 
as Editor of Canadian Labour, official jour- 
nal of the Canadian Labour Congress. 

Mr. Dowd's interest in labour began 
in the early 1920's, when he met the late 
Aaron R. Mosher, who at the time of his 
death in 1959 was Honorary President of 
the CLC (L.G. 1959, p. 1013), and M. M. 
Maclean, CBE, who retired in 1958 as 
federal Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour 
(L.G. 1958, p. 473). 

Mr. Maclean, at the time Mr. Dowd first 
met him, was National President and Secre- 
tary Treasurer of the Canadian Brotherhood 
of Railway Employees, and as a result of 
the meeting Mr. Dowd began writing for 
the CBRE monthly magazine. From 1927 
until 1940 he occupied the post of Assistant 
Editor of the publication. 

In 1936, Mr. Dowd was elected Secretary- 
Treasurer of the All-Canadian Congress of 
Labour and Editor of its official magazine, 
The Canadian Unionist. He held the latter 
post until 1956, when Canadian Labour 
was established. 

In 1940, Mr. Dowd was elected first 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Canadian Con- 
gress of Labour, successor to the All-Cana- 
dian Congress of Labour. 

At the second convention of the CCL, 
in 1941, Mr. Dowd was appointed Executive 
Secretary. He continued in that post until 
1956, when the Canadian Labour Congress 
was formed through the merger of the CCL 
and the Trades and Labour Congress of 
Canada. He became Executive Secretary of 
the CLC at that time. 

Mr. Dowd attended many International 
Labour Organization Conferences in Gen- 
eva, and was present at the founding meet- 
ing in New York, in 1946, of the World 
Health Organization. 

He also represented the CLC on the 
Canadian Citizenship Council and Canadian 
Centenary Council Board of Directors, 



Canadian Vice-President of lAM, 
George P. Schollie to Retire 

George P. Schollie, who has served for 
12 years as Vice-President in Canada of 
the International Association of Machinists, 
is retiring from office, it was announced 
last month. 

Mr. Schollie was born in Scotland, and at 
the age of 15 he was apprenticed at the 
Queen's Park Locomotive Works. After a 
year's apprenticeship he joined the Amal- 
gamated Society of Engineers. He came to 
Canada in 1921. 

After a year in Yorkton, Sask., he 
obtained employment as a labourer in the 
Weston Shops of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way in Winnipeg. In 1927 Mr. Schollie 
joined the International Association of 
Machinists, and within three years he had 
been elected President of Lodge 122 of 
the union. 

He served for some time as Secretary of 
the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, 
and during the depression he played a 
prominent part in helping to maintain the 
only labour paper in Winnipeg. 

In 1943 he was appointed Secretary of 
the Canadian office of the International 
Association of Machinists, with headquarters 
in Montreal. 

Mr. Schollie was a Canadian worker 
delegate at the first, second and third 
sessions of the ILO Iron and Steel Com- 
mittee and at every meeting to date of 
the ILO Metal Trades Committee. 

In 1949 he was elected Canadian Vice- 
President of the Machinists union, and he 
has held the office ever since. In 1954 he 
was elected a vice-president of the Trades 
and Labour Congress of Canada; and at 
the merger convention in 1956 of the TLC 
and the Canadian Congress of Labour, he 
was elected one of the three vice-presidents 
of the new Canadian Labour Congress from 
the Quebec region. He held this office for 
one two-year term, but did not stand for 
re-election in 1958. 



Frank Bodie, for the past five and a half 
years Secretary-Treasurer of the Calgary 
Labour Council, has become the first full- 
time secretary of the Alberta Federation 
of Labour. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



111 



Issue Forecast of Employment 
Of Engineers and Scientists 

During the three-year period 1960 to 
1962 the employment of engineers is ex- 
pected to increase at an average rate of 
5.5 per cent a year, and that of scientists 
at an average rate of 4.6 per cent. During 
1959 the actual increase in the employment 
of engineers was 4.2 per cent, and that of 
scientists 4.1 per cent. 

These figures are given in a report just 
published by the Economics and Research 
Branch of the Department of Labour. The 
report, No. 8 in the Professional Manpower 
Bulletin Series, is entitled Employment Out- 
look for Professional Personnel in Scien- 
tific and Technical Fields, 1960-62. It is 
similar to Report No. 5, which covered 
the period 1958-1960 and was issued early 
in 1959. 

Like the earlier one, this report is based 
on a survey of employers in industry, col- 
leges and universities, and government agen- 
cies. The number of employers covered 
was about 2,800, which was about 100 more 
than were covered by the previous survey. 
About 94 per cent of those to whom the 
questionnaire was sent submitted returns. 

The returns extended over the employ- 
ment of about 27,200 engineers, 12,500 
scientists, and a little more than 600 archi- 
tects. Besides data on total employment, 
and on recent and anticipated employment 
for 16 categories of professional persons, 
the employers furnished information re- 
garding recruitment difficulties, shortages 
of professional personnel, and numbers of 
professionals hired or promoted from sub- 
professional ranks. 



The questionnaire was sent to all em- 
ployers of more than 100 workers in 
following employment fields: mining and 
quarrying, manufacturing, transportation 
and public utilities, trade and finance, col- 
leges and universities, and government 
agencies. In the construction industry, only 
firms employing more than 200 workers 
were surveyed. This change from the prac- 
tice followed in earlier surveys was made 
because of the extreme fluctuations of em- 
ployment and the comparatively low con- 
centration of engineers and scientists in 
the industry. 

The forecast of requirements for engineers 
is broken down into eight professional fields, 
e.g., aeronautical, chemical, etc.; for scien- 
tists the forecast is divided into seven fields. 
There is a separate forecast for architects. 

Copies of the bulletin may be obtained 
from the Queen's Printer, Ottawa, at a price 
of 25 cents each. 



To Increase Job Opportunities, 
Seek Business Abroad, CCA Says 

As a means of increasing the market for 
construction skills and services, the develop- 
ment of business abroad by Canadian con- 
struction firms was advocated by Jack M. 
Soules, President of the Canadian Construc- 
tion Association, in an address last month 
to the Empire Club of Canada in Toronto. 

Also advocated as a means of maintaining 
and extending employment opportunities 
in the construction industry was the making 
of every effort to increase the amount of 
year-round construction employment by 
reducing the cyclical and seasonal charac- 
teristics of construction activity. 



HOUSE OF COMMONS DEBATES 
A Guide to Items of Labour Interest in Hansard 



{page numbers refer to Hansard) 
January 16 — The Minister of Labour, in 
reply to a question, explains why he tabled 
the report of the Unemployment Insurance 
Commission Advisory Committee on De- 
cember 21 after telling the House the day 
before that he was not prepared to table 
it yet because the Government was still 
studying it: he was advised it would have 
to be tabled before the Christmas recess in 
order to keep within the time prescribed in 
the Act (p. 1056). 

International Union of Operating Engi- 
neers has expressed satisfaction with the 
manner in which the Department of Na- 



tional Health and Welfare arranged for the 
improvement in working conditions at the 
South Saskatchewan dam, the Minister of 
National Health and Welfare reports (p. 
1065). 

A great deal less overtime than ever 
before was worked by the permanent staff 
of his department this Christmas, the Post- 
master General says in answer to a question 
on the method of payment for overtime. 
This year the staff were encouraged "in 
every possible case" to liquidate overtime 
credits by taking time off during January 
rather than by being paid in cash, he said 
(p. 1068). 



112 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



New definition of the service contract, 
contained in a circular issued by the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission on Sep- 
tember 27, 1960, "will have disastrous 
results," including the elimination of almost 
all cases of insurability in casual and 
seasonal jobs, and will be a serious handicap 
to the winter work campaign, says Jean- 
Paul Racine (Beauce) during the debate on 
the supplementary Budget (p. 1084). 

Employment by TCA of a number of 
stewardesses and cabin attendants recruited 
in foreign countries, a practice found desir- 
able by every other major international 
airline, in no way contradicts the general 
policy of the TCA of employing Canadians 
wherever possible, the Minister of Transport 
says in reply to a question (p. 1102). 

January 17 — A report that non-operating 
employees of the Canadian Pacific Railway 
in the Revelstoke division who were laid off 
as a result of the threatened strike have 
not been re-employed was referred to in a 
question by Hazen Argue (Assiniboia). In 
reply, the Minister of Transport said the 
employees had been laid off because of a 
decline in traffic resulting partly from the 
grain handlers strike in Vancouver. It was 
expected, however, that they would soon be 
re-employed. The company management, he 
said, denied that the reductions were due 
to the proposed non-ops strike (p. 1106). 

January 18 — The basis of measurement 
of unemployment used in the United States 
is not in every particular the same as that 
used in Canada, the Prime Minister pointed 
out in answer to a question that drew atten- 
tion to a report that the percentage of unem- 
ployment in Canada in relation to the 
labour force is 8.2, whereas it is 6.5 in the 
United States (p. 1165). 

The number of housing starts in 1960 in 
municipalities of more than 5,000 was 
about 100,000, and was expected to be 
between 9,000 and 10,000 in municipalities 
of less than 5,000 population, the Minister 
of Public Works says in reply to a question 
(p. 1166). 

January 19 — Second reading of Bill No. 
C-3, to amend the Interest Act by providing 
a statutory limit of 12 per cent on all 
interest rates charged in Canada, moved by 
Hazen Argue (Assiniboia). After long 
debate, the House adjourned without ques- 
tion put (p. 1218). 

January 24 — The Prime Minister says he 
has asked the negotiating committee for the 
railway non-operating employees and the 
representatives of the railway companies to 
meet and resume their negotiations for the 
settlement of their dispute (p. 1343). 

Outdoor advertising for the "Do It Now" 
winter employment campaign are made 



available by the Department of Labour to 
the outdoor advertising associations in both 
English and French, the Minister of Labour 
says in reply to a question asked by the 
member for Chicoutimi (p. 1347). 

Mortgages relating to 264 NHA houses 
in Elliot Lake are now in default, and the 
approved leaders have notified the Central 
Mortgage and Housing Corporation of their 
intention to claim on the mortgage insur- 
ance fund, the Minister of Public Works 
replies to a question by the Leader of the 
Opposition (p. 1348). 

No representations regarding non-payment 
of wages promised by a construction com- 
pany working at Grand Rapids, Man., have 
been made by Indians to her department, 
the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration 
says in reply to a question. Many of those 
concerned are not of Indian blood and are 
not the responsibility of her department, 
but to protect those Indians who are partly 
the responsibility of her department, "we 
have been in constant consultation with the 
authorities of the province of Manitoba," 
she said (p. 1351). 

January 25 — Resolution preceding intro- 
duction of a measure to authorize agree- 
ment with the provinces to provide for the 
sharing of costs of carrying out programs 
of vocational rehabilitation for disabled 
persons, the establishment of a national 
advisory council on the rehabilitation of 
disabled persons, and other matters con- 
nected with rehabilitation is introduced by 
the Minister of Labour (p. 1391). 

No staff reductions are involved in the 
CNR's amalgamation of the Lakehead and 
Port Arthur divisions to form a new admin- 
istrative unit called the Lakehead Area, 
with headquarters at Port Arthur, the 
Minister of Transport says in reply to a 
question (p. 1392). 

The number of unplaced job applicants 
during the last four months of 1960, given 
by the Parliamentary Secretary to the 
Minister of Labour in reply to a question, 
was: September 15—346,176; October 13— 
357,677; November 17—452,715; December 
15—640,226 (p. 1394). 

The amount of unemployment insurance 
benefit paid to fishermen in each of the 
four years since fishermen became eligible 
for benefit is given in tabular form (p. 
1395). 

Unemployment Insurance Commission 
has been asked to give careful study to the 
possibility of bringing farm labourers under 
the Act as an insured class but because of 
the many difficulties involved the Commis- 
sion has not as yet reported, the Minister 
of Labour says in reply to a question (p. 
1399). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



113 



Employment In Canada in 1960 



Economy continued to operate at tiigh level during 1960 but advance over the 
preceding year less marked than during 1959. Employment, labour income both 
higher but, despite 2-per-cent rise in non-farm employment, unemployment rose 



The Canadian economy continued to 
operate at a high level of activity during 
1960, although the advance was less marked 
than in 1959. A number of mixed trends 
resulted in a slackening off in the over-all 
pace. 

Total investment is expected to be slightly 
lower in 1960 than it was in 1959, prin- 
cipally owing to the fact that the number 
of houses built or being built was smaller. 
But the total investment program continues 
to be impressive, especially when compared 
with similar investment programs in other 
countries. 

There was a slackening off during the 
year in activity in some domestic markets, 
but exports continued to rise well above 
the preceding year's levels. 

Consumers spent more, but the rise in 
spending did not match the rise in dispos- 
able income, so that they saved more in 
1960 than in 1959. 

The effect of these varying trends re- 
sulted in higher employment than in 1959 
and an increase in labour income. At 
mid-year, average earnings were 3i per cent 
higher than one year earlier and about 2 
per cent higher when allowance is made for 
price increases of consumer goods. All 
major industry groups shared in the increase 
in wages and salaries. 

Labour-management negotiations showed 
a marked improvement over 1959 and only 
3 per cent of all major settlements were 
concluded when workers were out on strike. 

A disturbing feature of the development 
during the year was that despite an almost 
2-per-cent increase in non-farm employ- 
ment, unemployment increased over the 
1959 level. 

The underlying trend of employment was 
upward during 1960. Total non-farm em- 
ployment in October was estimated to be 
5,436,000, which was 94,000 higher than 
the year before. This represents a growth 
rate of just under 2 per cent and compares 
with an annual average increase of 2.8 per 
cent over the past decade. All of the 
employment advance took place in the 
service-producing group of industries (serv- 
ice, trade, finance, utilities and transporta- 
tion), with community services showing 
the most marked employment growth. On 
the other hand, employment in the goods- 
producing industries slackened off during 
the year. The net result was that require- 
ments for women workers were exception- 



ally high while total employment for men 
showed little change. 

The average length of the work week 
changed very little during the year, and 
wage increases compared favourably with 
1959. Total labour income, seasonally ad- 
justed, increased during the year, but less 
markedly than in 1959. To some extent, the 
relatively small increase in labour income 
can be attributed to the change in the 
pattern of unemployment growth. As indi- 
cated above, employment expansion has 
been concentrated in the relatively low- 
wage industries. 

Industrial developments of the past year 
have had significant effects on the growth 
rate of the labour force, and on the level 
of employment and unemployment. While 
industry growth patterns are seldom uni- 
form, they have been particularly uneven 
in 1960. On the one hand, there has been 
a strong demand for workers in occupations 
usually occupied by women, that is, in the 
service-producing industries, where almost 
40 per cent of job-holders are women. On 
the other hand, demand for workers in 
the goods-producing industries, where men 
predominate, actually declined. 

The marked expansion of jobs for women 
has attracted a large number of these from 
outside the labour force, resulting in a 
sharp expansion of the female labour force. 
In October 1960, the female labour force 
was 130,000 higher than the year before. 
This compares with an annual average in- 
crease in the previous six years, 1953-59, 
of about 60,000. On the other hand, the 
male labour force increased over the year 
by about 80,000, an increase which is in 
line with the average annual growth for 
the previous six years. The net result of 
this has been that in October the total 
labour force exceeded the year-earlier figure 
by more than 200,000 despite a low level of 
immigration. 

The levelling-off in demand for men 
workers has been a principal cause of the 
increase in unemployment. The adult male 
tends to enter the labour force whether or 
not jobs are available. If he does not find 
a job he becomes unemployed. Women, 
particularly married women, tend to enter 
when there is a demand for their services. 
Thus, in October, when total unemployment 
was up from the previous year by 117,000, 
men accounted for 102,000 and women for 
15,000. 



114 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196 1 



Unemployment in October was estimated 
to be 368,000, or 5.7 per cent of the labour 
force. A year before it was 251,000, com- 
prising 4.0 per cent of the labour force. 

The largest year-to-year percentage in- 
crease in unemployment of men was in 
the 20-24 year age group; the smallest was 
among those 45 years of age and over. 
Unemployment rates continued to be sub- 
stantially higher among teen-age males 
than in any other age group. Persons with 
no work experience continued to account 
for a relatively small part of the total. 

Long-term unemployment was more pre- 
valent than in 1959. In October some 
102,000 job-seekers had been seeking work 
for four months or more. A year before, 
60,000 of a smaller total of job-seekers 
had been seeking work for this length of 
time. 

Production levelled off or declined dur- 
ing the past year in some of the goods- 
producing industries. A decline took place 
in construction; manufacturing and mining 
showed no appreciable change. Output in 
forestry declined during the first half of 
the year but recovered rapidly during the 
third quarter. All of the industries providing 
services increased their output during the 
year. The largest advance occurred in trans- 
portation, communication, finance, insur- 
ance, real estate, government and com- 
munity service. Expansion of educational 
and health facilities accounted for most of 
the rise in community service. 

For the most part, employment changes 
were similar though not as marked as the 
changes in production. Construction showed 
a marked decline while manufacturing 
employment, although down from last 
year, showed no appreciable change, apart 
from seasonal changes. All of the service- 
producing industries except utilities regis- 
tered increases. Employment in the primary 
industries other than agriculture did not 
change appreciably over the year. Total 
employment in the goods-producing indus- 
tries was, however, somewhat lower than in 



1959. The net gain in employment in the 
service-producing industries in the third 
quarter of 1960 was 149,000. 

Compared with last year, changes in pro- 
duction and employment levels in manu- 
facturing industries were mixed. Of the 17 
broad industry groups which make up the 
index of manufacturing production, six 
were operating at higher levels; the rest 
showed no appreciable change or were 
down. Similar, though somewhat smaller 
changes, took place in employment. Those 
showing gains were non-ferrous metals, 
paper products, wood products, chemicals 
and miscellaneous manufacturing industries. 
The upward trend in activity in non-ferrous 
metals can be attributed, in part, to a 
substantial increase in exports. Sales of 
aluminum, nickel and copper showed con- 
spicuously large gains. Employment in the 
durable goods industries, however, weakened 
over the course of the year. In August the 
employment index for durables was down 
6.7 per cent from the year before while 
non-durables showed no appreciable change. 

Although the iron and steel industries 
were still operating at high levels at year- 
end, they slackened off somewhat during 
the year. Although almost all parts of this 
group of industries were operating at slightly 
lower levels than in 1959, the most marked 
contractions occurred in agricultural im- 
plements and structural and fabricated steel. 

The curtailment of activity in agricultural 
implements can be attributed, in part, to a 
weakening in the export market. Export 
sales of agricultural implements during the 
first eight months were down 27 per cent 
from the comparable period in 1959. 

There was also a slight employment 
decline in the automotive industry. Produc- 
tion levels have been fairly well maintained 
in this industry but employment levels were 
slightly lower during the summer of 1960 
than in the previous year. On the other 
hand, employment in a number of manu- 
facturing industries such as wood products, 
paper products and chemicals either held 
its own or increased over the year. 



Wages and Working Conditions, 1960 



At mid-year the wages and salaries of 
employees in non-farm industries averaged 
$76.31 per week. This was an increase of 
3i per cent in average earnings between 
July 1959 and July 1960. Since consumer 
prices increased by only 1.3 per cent during 
that period, real average earnings advanced 
on average by more than 2 per cent since 
the middle of 1959. 

All major industry groups shared in the 
increase in wages and salaries. Between 



July 1959 and July 1960, earnings in manu- 
facturing and in transportation, storage and 
communication increased at the same rate 
as the industrial average. In mining, trade, 
finance, insurance and real estate the rise 
in average wages and salaries was between 
2 and 3 per cent, while earnings in services, 
forestry, public utilities and construction 
increased by between 5 and 6 per cent. The 
proportionate increase in average earnings 
was greatest in the relatively low-income 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



115 



Atlantic Provinces. Employees in these areas 
consequently improved their position in rela- 
tion to those in the rest of the country. 

Conditions of work appear to have 
become relatively stable, after the rapid 
changes that have occurred in these con- 
ditions in the years since the war. In 1960, 
as in 1959, approximately 70 per cent of 
plant workers in manufacturing were em- 
ployed in establishments with a standard 
work week of 40 hours or less. Moreover, 
approximately 90 per cent of plant workers 
in manufacturing were employed in estab- 
lishments working a five-day week, and two- 
thirds worked in establishments which pro- 
vided pension plans. 

Among other important items in the lleld 
of working conditions, it is notable that 
workers in manufacturing plants employing 
almost four out of five workers have sick- 
ness and accident leave credit plans, and 
more than nine out of ten workers in 
manufacturing are employed in plants pro- 
viding at least two weeks vacation with 
pay. 

At the beginning of 1960, approximately 
one-third of the non-farm labour force in 
Canada belonged to labour organizations. 
Trade union membership in Canada now 
stands at 1,459,000 workers. 

During the first half of last year, 95 
major collective agreements covering over 



117,000 workers were signed. As in 1959, 
approximately one-third of these major 
agreements, each covering about 500 or 
more workers, were for a period of one 
year, and slightly more than one-half were 
for a two-year period. 

Only 3 per cent of these settlements were 
concluded when workers were out on strike. 
Time lost as a result of strikes was much 
lower in 1960 than in any of the five 
preceding years. In the first ten months of 
the year, 663,000 man-days were lost as a 
result of 215 work stoppages (compared 
with 2,270,000 man-days lost in the same 
period in 1959), and the proportion of 
estimated working time lost through strikes 
and lockouts was less than one-tenth of 
one per cent. 

Increases in base wage rates in one-year 
agreements affecting 500 or more workers 
were predominantly grouped in the ranges 
from 5 to 10 cents per hour and 15 to 20 
cents per hour. Increases in base rates in 
most of the two-year agreements ranged 
from 5 to 15 cents per hour over the life 
of the agreement. Approximately two-thirds 
of the three-year agreements, which con- 
stituted less than one-ninth of the agree- 
ments signed in the first half of 1960, 
contained increases in base rates ranging 
from 10 to 25 cents per hour. 



Regional Employment Conditions 



Atlantic Region — Economic conditions 
in the Atlantic region showed a moderate 
improvement during 1960. Employment 
averaged about 14,000 higher than in the 
previous year, a gain of 3 per cent. Unem- 
ployment, on the average, was unchanged 
from 1959 although in the fourth quarter 
it was somewhat higher. The labour force 
averaged 14,000 higher than in 1959, one 
of the largest advances in recent years. 

Increases in employment and earnings 
were reflected in a rise in total labour 
income. For the first 10 months labour 
income in the region was estimated at 
$1,033 million, compared with $978 million 
during the corresponding period in 1959. 
This represents an increase of 6 per cent, 
a little less than the average gain of the 
past seven years. 

Forestry and the service-producing in- 
dustries were mainly responsible for the 
employment expansion during 1960. Em- 
ployment in forestry in the first 10 months 
was better than one-third higher than in 
the corresponding period in 1959. This 
improvement was confined to pulpwood 
logging, which had been a major source of 
weakness in the previous year. The lumber- 
ing industry showed less strength than in 



1959, the slowdown in housebuilding activity 
having an adverse effect on domestic sales 
of lumber. 

Reduced activity in rail transportation had 
a moderating influence on employment ex- 
pansion in the service-producing industries. 
Employment in rail transportation in Nova 
Scotia and New Brunswick averaged about 
5 per cent lower during the first 10 months 
of 1960 than in the corresponding period 
of 1959. 

One of the more important developments 
in manufacturing was the recovery of the 
iron and steel industry. Except for the wire 
and nail mill, which has been hampered by 
market conditions for several years, the 
Sydney steel mills were operating at better 
than 90 per cent of capacity during the 
last quarter. Shipbuilding activity declined 
during the fourth quarter after increasing 
during the summer and early fall. The 
aircraft industry was a little busier than in 
the previous year but in the manufacture 
of railway rolling stock, a major source of 
weakness in 1959, there was little or no 
improvement. Pulp and paper and food and 
beverage plants registered modest employ- 
ment advances during the year but saw- 
milling activity was sharply curtailed. 



116 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



REGIONAL EMPLOYMENT TRENDS 
1953 - 1 960 



THOUSANDS 

10,000 



(read left scale) 



(read right icale) 



'^M'\ 'vf;?-~-!| 



THOUSANDS 

1,000 



CANADA 



ATLANTIC 



8,000 


6.000 


/>s/x. 




- 








/nXV" 



1 ... I ... I 



1953 -54 55 56 57 58 59 W) 1958 1959 1960 1953 '54 55 56 57 58 59 '60 1958 1959 1960 



ONTARIO 



1,000 



1 I t I j I t ' I 



J..JJ 



1953 54 55 56 57 58 59-60 1958 1959 1960 1953 '54 '55 56 57 58 59 '60 1958 1959 1960 



PRAIRIE 



PACIFIC 



1,600 



1,200 



■" 


/N/^>/ ^ 




^^ 







-L-LJ 



1953 54 55 56 57 58 59 '60 1958 1959 1960 1953 '54 55 56 57 58 59 '60 1958 1959 1960 

Annual Averages Quorterly Aniiaal Averages Quarterly 



Source: Labour Force Survey, D.B.S. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196 1 



117 



Activity in coal mining continued to 
decline during the year. This industry has 
been experiencing periodic cutbacks in pro- 
duction since the summer of 1958. The 
average number employed in 1960 was 
down about 8 per cent from the previous 
year. 

Construction employment was lower than 
in 1959, mainly reflecting the decline in 
housebuilding activity. Reduced employment 
in housebuilding, and in street and highway 
construction during the latter part of the 
year, pulled total construction employment 
down. Employment in other types of non- 
residential construction showed no appre- 
ciable change from 1959. 

Quebec Region — Employment growth in 
1960 in the Quebec region proceeded at a 
slower pace than in the previous year and 
was also somewhat behind the national 
average. The labour force grew at double 
the employment rate but again more slowly 
than the Canadian average. Most of the 
increase in employment occurred in the 
first half of the year; about the middle of 
the third quarter it dropped off sharply 
and for the rest of the year remained only 
slightly above the level of the previous 
year. Unemployment increased substantially, 
averaging 9.1 per cent of the labour force 
for the year as a whole as against a Cana- 
dian average of 7 per cent. 

The slowdown in employment growdi was 
due, for the most part, to a sharp drop in 
agricultural employment. The increase in 
non-agricultural employment (2.6 per cent) 
was only fractionally below that of the 
previous year. This was the net result of 
offsetting gains and losses in a number of 
major industries, reflecting the changes in 
the main components of aggregate demand 
that have taken place during the year. Pri- 
vate investment, including investment in new 
housing, was somewhat lower than in 1959 
and there was an easing in consumer demand 
for domestically produced durable goods. On 
the other hand, demand strengthened for 
non-durable consumers goods and for serv- 
ices, and there was a rise in export demand. 

Total manufacturing employment, season- 
ally adjusted, increased in the first half of 
the year but a sharp drop in the last six 
months resulted in a decrease for the year 
as a whole. First among the industries most 
affected were those manufacturing iron and 
steel products. A contributing factor was 
a strike of 1,500 steel workers at Lachine 
which lasted from mid-August to the end 
of October. The largest declines, mostly in 
the second half of the year, were recorded 
in machinery and transportation equipment. 
One conspicuous exception in this group 
was the aircraft and parts industry, where 



employment remained at a high level 
throughout the year. The reduced level of 
construction was reflected in a decline in 
demand for lumber and building materials, 
the sales of which during the first 10 months 
of the year dropped more than 14 per cent 
from a year earlier. The demand for furni- 
ture and household appliances also showed 
a considerable decline as a result of the 
drop in housebuilding. 

Increased consumer demand manifested 
itself mainly in increased sales of basic ne- 
cessities associated with population growth, 
such as food and clothing. However, only 
in the former commodity was this increase 
translated into additional domestic produc- 
tion and employment; the demand for cloth- 
ing was partly met by imports. As a result, 
employment in primary textiles barely held 
its own, whereas the clothing industry 
showed an employment decline. 

A rise in consumer spending on services 
was reflected in increases in employment in 
most service-producing industries. Heading 
the list was the service industry proper, with 
an average employment increase of more 
than 4 per cent over 1959, followed by 
retail trade, public utilities, and finance 
and insurance. The only major industry in 
this group that showed an employment 
decline was transportation, storage and com- 
munication. The service-producing industries 
helped to offset the effect of reduced activity 
in manufacturing and construction and to 
keep employment above last year's level. 

The rise in export demand for Canadian 
goods was, of course, reflected in the 
economy of the Quebec region and most 
directly in the mining and forestry products 
industries, although the effect on employ- 
ment was not as great as on production. 
Output of the leading mineral products — 
asbestos, iron ore and copper — rose con- 
siderably during the first three quarters of 
the year and was accompanied by a sub- 
stantial year-to-year percentage increase in 
employment. In absolute terms, however, 
this increase was not too significant, as 
employment in mining represents less than 
3 per cent of total industrial employment. 
The pulp and paper industry achieved a 
record production in 1960, owing mainly 
to increased exports both to the United 
States and overseas. Output of pulp, news- 
print and most other paper products rose 
by more than 5 per cent but this was not 
matched by an equal rise in employment. 
In fact, employment in forestry and in the 
paper products industry remained below 
last year's level during the first half of the 
year, and only later showed a slowly rising 
trend. 



118 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



The decline in capital investment was 
partly reflected in a decline in construction. 
The value of construction contracts awarded 
in the region in the first 10 months of the 
year showed a greater percentage decrease 
from the previous year than in the rest of 
Canada. New residential construction drop- 
ped by more than 25 per cent, the fall being 
most marked in the first half of the year. 
In non-residential construction, the value 
of building permits issued indicates that 
industrial and commercial construction plans 
in the January-to-July period were well 
ahead of the year before but underwent 
a substantial downward revision in later 
months. As a result of these developments, 
total construction employment during the 
first 10 months of the year declined by close 
to 2 per cent from a year earlier. Toward 
the end of the year, residential construction 
experienced a sharp upturn, which, along 
with increased municipal building activity 
in connection with the Municipal Winter 
Works Incentive Program, has created new 
employment opportunities for construction 
workers. 

Ontario Region — Ontario in 1960 exper- 
ienced a continuing expansion of economic 
activity and, along with it, an increase in 
employment over the year. But in some 
industries the seasonal employment gain 
was considerably smaller than usual, mainly 
because of low levels of residential con- 
struction, earlier-than-usual shutdowns of 
automobile and parts plants for retooling, 
and weaknesses in some parts of heavy 
manufacturing, notably agricultural imple- 
ments, electrical apparatus and road mach- 
inery plants. The continued growth of the 
trade and service industries, however, 
helped to lift employment well above the 
1959 level. 

Unemployment increased during the year. 
On the average, it represented 5.4 per cent 
of the labour force compared with 4.5 per 
cent in 1959. Much of the increase was 
among construction and metalworking occu- 
pations, and almost all of it was among 
men. 

Employment increased by 2.3 per cent 
from 1959 to 1960, about the same as 
the advance in the previous year. The sea- 
sonal increase in the first half of the year 
was only about two-thirds as large as the 
average of the previous four years. 

The rise in labour income was smaller 
than in most recent years. At $6,381 million 
for the January-October period, total labour 
income was 3 per cent higher than in the 
previous year. During 1959, the increase 
amounted to 9 per cent. 

One of the most notable employment 
developments during the year was the slight 



decrease in the number of men employed 
while the number of women employed 
increased by 41,000, or 6.6 per cent. This 
was the product of increased employment 
opportunities in the service industry, which 
employs a relatively high proportion of 
women, and a weakening in those industries 
employing a high proportion of men, not- 
ably residential construction, iron and steel 
products and other heavy goods manufac- 
turing. 

Total manufacturing employment was 
considerably lower than in 1959. Increased 
employment in paper products, food and 
beverages, and wood products was more 
than offset by declines in other parts of 
manufacturing. High levels of production 
and employment were maintained in the 
automotive industry during the first half of 
the year but various production runs of 
1960 models were completed in June, and 
many workers were released from assembly 
and parts plants for most of the summer, 
during the retooling period. After this 
earlier-than-usual changeover period, rehir- 
ing of automotive and associated workers 
began in September and continued through 
the rest of the year, but employment did not 
reach the level of the previous year. 

In the aircraft industry, from a five-year 
employment low in January, conditions im- 
proved substantially during most of the 
year. Contributing greatly to the recovery 
of this industry were substantial orders for 
the DHC-4 Caribou transport aircraft manu- 
factured by de Havilland Aircraft. 

The high levels of production and em- 
ployment in the iron and steel industry 
during the last half of 1959 carried into 
the second quarter of 1960. Since April, 
however, there has been a downward trend 
in the domestic market for most steel prod- 
ucts, particularly for primary iron and steel, 
heavy machinery, and agricultural imple- 
ments. 

Layoffs were prevalent in the shipyard 
industry, though prospects improved during 
the latter part of the year as a result of 
new orders at the Collingwood shipyards for 
one large carrier and two small freighters. 
In addition, plants in Peterborough were 
awarded a contract to build large marine 
steam turbine drives, the first of this type 
to be made in Canada. 

Construction employment was down 6.5 
per cent from a year earlier, and was at the 
lowest level in five years. One of the main 
reasons was the low level of housebuilding; 
the number of units started was down 
about 25 per cent and the volume under 
construction in November was 17 per cent 
lower than a year earlier. On the other 
hand, non-residential construction had a 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



119 



fairly good year and received an extra 
boost in late autumn when fine weather 
allowed construction work to continue at a 
high rate longer than usual. 

There was considerable improvement in 
employment in the forestry industry: each 
of the first ten months showed higher em- 
ployment levels than in 1959, and in August 
employment reached the highest level since 
late 1957. Increased demand for wood 
products and the continuing strong demand 
for paper products were responsible for this 
upturn in employment. 

In the mining industry, there were few 
staff reductions except in uranium mining, 
in which gradual shutdowns occurred in 
the Elliot Lake region. This steady level of 
employment in mining produced a record 
value of minerals. 

The underlying increase in employment in 
Ontario was strongly supported by expan- 
sion of the service industry. There were 
particularly strong demands for workers 
in community, government and recreational 
services. Ontario accounted for a consider- 
able proportion of the all-Canada gain in 
employment in the service industry, which 
amounted to 114,000. 

Prairie Region — Employment continued 
to expand in the Prairie region in 1960, 
although the gain of 1.6 per cent from the 
year before was considerably smaller than 
in most recent years. In non-farm industries 
substantial gains in services and trade were 
partially offset by moderate losses in con- 
struction, manufacturing and transportation. 
In agricultural employment, the long-term 
decline continued, although the reduction 
was smaller than in most previous years. 
Labour income in the first 10 months was 
4 per cent higher than in the same period 
of 1959. 

Unemployment in 1960 represented 4.2 
per cent of the labour force compared with 
3.3 per cent in 1959. Much of the increase 
occurred in unskilled male occupations, 
especially among the construction trades. 

Closure of a uranium mine in northern 
Saskatchewan due to depletion of the ore 
body, along with a slight reduction in 
demand for structural materials, brought 
employment in mining below the preceding 
year's level. Production of other minerals 
continued to expand, however, and the 
total value of minerals produced was higher 
than in 1959 by 4 per cent in Alberta, 2 
per cent in Saskatchewan, and 2 per cent 
in Manitoba. Crude oil, with a gain of 
about 3 per cent, and gas, up more than 
20 per cent, accounted for most of the 
increase. These increases in petroleum out- 
put, however, were not reflected in employ- 



ment gains, because the industry still con- 
tinued to operate well below capacity. Coal 
mining employment in Alberta continued 
to decline, but a 12-per-cent production 
increase occurred in Saskatchewan, raising 
the production of this province to almost 
half of the regional total. The added pro- 
duction involved relatively few workers, 
however, because of the heavy mechaniza- 
tion of surface mining in northeastern 
Saskatchewan. Manitoba recorded the only 
over-all increase in mining employment as 
new nickel and copper developments in the 
northern part of the province required 
additional miners. 

Four massive hydro electric projects, one 
coupled to an irrigation development, and 
a sizeable program of gas and oil gathering 
and distribution pipeline construction helped 
to offset a sharp drop in housebuilding in 
the Prairie region. Housing starts in the 
first 11 months were lower than in the 
previous year by almost 45 per cent in 
Alberta, more than 35 per cent in Saskat- 
chewan, and more than 20 per cent in 
Manitoba. Total construction employment 
in the second half of 1960 was slightly 
higher than a year earlier in Saskatchewan, 
however, partly as a result of work on two 
hydro projects — on the South Saskatchewan 
River near Outlook and at Squaw Rapids, 
northeast of Prince Albert. In the other 
two provinces, employment was lower than 
in 1959. 

Declines from a year earlier in manu- 
facturers' shipments, ranging from 5 per 
cent in Saskatchewan to 1 per cent in 
Alberta in the first five months of 1960, 
brought employment in manufacturing 
slightly below the previous year in all 
provinces. Weaknesses were apparent in 
factories associated with the construction 
industry, especially with housebuilding, such 
as sash and door plants, furniture and 
appliance plants and suppliers of heating 
equipment. 

Employment in the iron and steel industry 
weakened noticeably during the second half 
of 1960, although there was some improve- 
ment toward the end of the year as a result 
of increased orders of large pipe for pipe- 
line construction. Clothing and textile plants 
employed generally fewer workers than in 
1959. Strong export demands for pulp and 
paper products throughout the year resulted 
in improved employment levels in pulp and 
paper plants, and pulpwood cutting in the 
district between Winnipeg and Lake Superior 
also employed more men than in 1959. 
Production of sawn lumber went up 2 per 
cent in the January-October period from the 
year before, with the largest gain in Alberta. 



120 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



Although retail sales in the January- 
October period of 1960 were down in 
Saskatchewan and Alberta and up only 
slightly in Manitoba from the same period 
in 1959, employment in trade held slightly 
above year-earlier levels through most of 
1960. Employment in the transportation 
industry was reduced about 5 per cent in 
the entire region, a change that corresponded 
with a similar decline in railway car- 
loadings in Canada. Increasing demands 
for electric power and natural gas in the 
region expanded employment in public 
utilities operation; government, domestic, 
and other services also expanded consider- 
ably. Finance, insurance and real estate 
establishments showed moderate employ- 
ment increases from 1959. 

Farm cash income from the sale of farm 
products in the first three quarters of 1960 
was 2 per cent below a year earlier. All 
three provinces shared in the decline. Pay- 
ments other than for sales of produce were 
higher than in 1959, however, and brought 
total receipts, slightly above the 1959 nine- 
month total. Employment on farms declined 
less than in most recent years as extra 
help was needed in the spring to harvest 
grain remaining over winter in the wake of 
early snowstorms in the fall of 1959. The 
1960 crop was comparable to the average 
of the past 10 years, and considerably better 
than the 1959 crop. 

Pacific Region — Employment levelled off 
in the Pacific region during 1960; declines 
in construction, fishing and most parts of 
manufacturing were offset by gains in pulp 
and paper manufacturing, agriculture, oil 
and gas development, and services. Mining 
and smelting employment continued steady 
from the year before, and in the transpor- 
tation industry a slight decline in railway 
employment was offset by higher employ- 
ment in water transportation, where activity 
was bolstered by increased export ship- 
ments. Average employment for the year as 
a whole remained virtually the same as in 
1959, but unemployment was 14,000 higher, 
mainly because of layoffs in construction 
and manufacturing. Labour income con- 
tinued to rise and for the first 10 months 
was 6 per cent higher than in the corres- 
ponding period in 1959. 

The forest products industries experienced 
a generally good year in 1960. Pulp and 
paper products were in strong demand and 
most plants operated near capacity all year; 
production was more than 10 per cent 
higher than in 1959. The first mill in the 
region to manufacture fine paper went into 
operation in June 1960. Sawmills produced 
about 5 per cent more lumber than in 1959; 
operations were relatively free of industrial 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



disputes and serious fire hazards. In the 
second half of the year, high inventories 
along with a slight weakening in lumber 
prices and lessened demand, especially for 
plywood, brought about some reductions in 
operating levels in many parts of the region. 

Apart from forestry products, employ- 
ment in manufacturing was generally lower 
than in 1959. A greatly reduced volume 
of fish landed held fish-canning and curing 
plants to reduced operating rates. Shipbuild- 
ing employment dropped as much as 25 
per cent below year-earlier levels and metal- 
working plants supplying the construction 
industry experienced reduced demands for 
their products. The seasonal employment 
upswing in iron and steel plants fell short 
of a year earlier so that by mid-year em- 
ployment was about 5 per cent lower than 
in 1959; further weaknesses developed as 
the year progressed and by the fourth 
quarter the employment decline in this 
industry amounted to almost 10 per cent. 

A heavy drop in residential building in 
1960 — the number of units started in the 
first 11 months was down 46 per cent from 
1959 — offset a substantial increase in the 
construction of new highways and streets 
(including bridges) to hold employment in 
construction about even with the 1959 level 
from the beginning of 1960 through most 
of the second quarter. In the third quarter, 
construction employment was about 10 per 
cent lower the year before. Large projects 
under construction during 1960 included a 
steel plant and a pulp mill in the southern 
interior part of the province. Additional 
construction was begun for gathering-system 
pipelines for gas and oil, and near Van- 
couver expansion continued on large-scale 
hydro and thermal generating plants. 

Preliminary estimates place the value of 
mineral production in 1960 at $175 million, 
about 17 per cent higher than 1959, and the 
highest total since 1956. Exploration and 
development work in the mining industry 
(including petroleum) was also maintained 
at high levels, with particular attention 
shown to iron ore, copper, asbestos, and 
gas and oil. The only production decline 
of any consequence occurred in structural 
materials such as sand and gravel and 
resulted from lower activity in the con- 
struction industry. Employment in the min- 
ing industry was sustained at favourable 
levels, but the increases were not compar- 
able to the gains in production. 

Production increases in mining and fores- 
try were an important source of employ- 
ment strength in the transportation industry, 
especially on the waterfront; the volume of 
shipments in the first half of the year was 
about 14 per cent above that in the same 



121 



period of 1959. Employment in other non- 
goods producing industries also held steady. 
Although retail sales were down in the first 
10 months by 3.4 per cent from the same 
period of 1959, employment in trade was 
only fractionally lower. In other service- 
producing industries such as hotels, restaur- 
ants and finance establishments, employment 
moved ahead of 1959 levels. 

Farm employment was somewhat higher 
than in 1959, and farm cash income showed 



a rise of 1.6 per cent. The fishing industry 
experienced an unfavourable year, with the 
whaling fleet entirely inactive and herring 
fishing suspended until November because 
of unfavourable market conditions. The 
salmon catch was far below average as it 
was a low cycle year for both sockeye and 
pink salmon. The total value of fish and 
shell fish landed in the first 10 months was 
about one-fifth lower than in the correspond- 
ing period in 1959. 



Special Report of Unemployment 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

After examination of full year's effect of increased contribution rates, the 
Committee found revenue substantially tiigher but expenditures much higher, too; 
warns that by May 1961 Unemployment Insurance Fund may be at unsafe level 



In spite of the higher contribution rates 
that came into effect on September 27, 1959, 
expenditures from the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Fund for benefits during the 1959-60 
fiscal year exceeded revenue, with the result 
that the Fund lost $135,762,337.64 during 
the year. 

This was one of the important points 
brought out in a special report of the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Advisory Committee 
tabled in the House of Commons on 
December 21, 1960. 

The Committee met on October 27, 1960, 
in accordance with the intention stated in 
its previous report, tabled on August 10 
last year (L.G., Sept. 1960, p. 902), to 
meet soon after October 1, by which time 
the increased rates had been in effect for 
a full year, to examine the effect on the 
Fund of the increased contribution rates. 

As a result of the new rates, the revenue 
during the year in which they had been in 
effect was substantially higher than in the 
previous year, the report states. On the 
other hand, expenditures were much higher, 
the payments during the winter months 
having been "very high indeed" because of 
the drain caused by seasonal benefit pay- 
ments. 

The number of those drawing regular 
benefit was also "much higher" than in 
1959. In September 1960 the total of live 
claims was 279,531, compared with 201,598 
for the same month in 1959, an increase of 
38.6 per cent. 

"It is not safe to estimate that the Fund 
will have a balance of greater than $140,- 
000,000 to $150,000,000 at the end of March 
1961," and it may be lower, the report says. 



As a result of seasonal benefit claims dur- 
ing April and May, "by the end of May 
1961 the Fund will possibly be as low 
as $85,000,000 and certainly at a most 
unsafe level." 

The Committee said that it found no 
grounds upon which to modify the recom- 
mendations contained in its reports of July 
8, 1958 (L.G. 1958, p. 1034) and July 27, 
1960 (L.G., Sept. 1960, p. 902), and 
urgently repeated its previous recommenda- 
tions regarding increasing the Government's 
contribution and also replenishing the Fund 
by a grant as recommended in the July 
1960 report. 

The Committee heard representations 
from a delegation of officials of the United 
Automobile Workers, led by George Burt, 
Canadian Director of the union, regarding 
earnings in respect of vacation periods and 
the right to draw unemployment insurance 
benefits during such periods. After consider- 
ing these representations, the Committee 
decided not to change the unanimous deci- 
sion it had reached on this matter at its 
July 1960 meeting. 

The question of unemployment insurance 
benefits for persons of 65 years of age and 
over, which was discussed at the July meet- 
ing, was further considered by the Com- 
mittee. No decision was reached on certain 
suggestions that were made by the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission at the 
previous meeting with the object of check- 
ing abuse of the fund by older applicants 
for benefit, and it was decided to discuss 
the matter further at the next meeting. 



122 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



The Committee also gave further con- 
sideration to the questions of the impact 
on the Fund of payment of benefits to 
married women. "The problem has been 
discussed at every meeting of the Com- 
mittee without an agreement being reached 
on a recommendation which would be 
unanimous," the report said. Some notes 
on the practices of other countries with 



regard to claims by married women were 
attached to the report. 

The Committee decided to continue its 
study of the problem. It stated that "the 
drain on the Fund is considerable," and 
that "means must be found to check im- 
proper claims." 

The report is printed in full below. 



Special Report of the Unemployment Insurance Advisory Committee 
Resulting From Meeting, October 27, 1960 



To His Excellency 

The Governor General in Council: 
The concluding paragraph of the Com- 
mittee's Report of July 27, 1960, reads as 
follows: 

The Committee plans to meet again soon 
after October 1st, 1960, at which time the 
increased contribution rates will have been in 
effect for a full year. After such meeting a 
further report will be submitted in which the 
results for one year respecting revenue and 
expenditures under the increased contribution 
scale effective September 27th, 1959, will be 
given. 

In compliance with the foregoing the 
Committee met on October 27, 1960, to 
review the revenue to, and the expenditure 
from, the Unemployment Insurance Fund 
for the 12 months ended September 30, 
1960, in comparison with same months of 
1959. 

The four members nominated by em- 
ployer organizations attended but only two 
of those nominated by employee organiza- 
tions were able to attend. Mr. Stephens had 
other engagements and Mr. Mathieu was 
prevented from attending because of the 
sudden death of his father. 

Attached is a comparative statement, 
month by month, for the 12-month periods 
ended September 1959 and September 1960 
showing [overleaf]: 

Profit or loss on sale of securities 

Total net Revenue 

Total Expenditures 

Balance in the Fund 

It will be observed that the revenue has 
been substantially higher due to the new 
contribution rates which became effective 
September 27, 1959, and the increase agrees 
fairly well with the estimates given by the 
Actuary. 

On the other hand the expenditures have 
been much higher than in 1959 and the 
payments during the Winter months have 
been very high indeed, because of seasonal 
benefit payments. 

The number of those in receipt of regular 
benefits has been much higher than in 1959. 
In September 1960, the total number of live 



claims was 279,531 as compared with 201, 
598 for the same month in 1959. This is an 
increase of 38.6%. 

September is usually the month of the 
year when claims are relatively low. 

A statement follows, showing the active 
unemployment insurance claim load month 
by month, for the three years, 1958, 1959 
and 1960: 

Active Claimants by Months 



October. . . 
November 
December. 

January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 



1957-58 


1958-59 


268,005 


323,530 


403,273 


419.233 


744,249 


714,954 


834,544 


785,071 


869,349 


795,999 


859,639 


766,862 


722,252 


610,770 


551,103 


279,431 


445,487 


220,548 


300.826 


225.945 


294,587 


209.966 


282.587 


201.598 



250,583 
417,541 
685,689 
782,542 
814,241 
823,005 
714,894 
364,323 
296,445 
294,137 
280,195 
279,531 



It will be noted that the total revenue 
for the 12 months ended September 30, 

1960, $322,976,253.86 increased from $228,- 
263,101.62 in the previous year by $94,713,- 
152.24. 

The expenditures for benefits in 1959-60 
were higher than the revenue, even at the 
new contribution rates effective in that year. 
This entailed a loss to the Fund of $135,- 
762,337.64. 

As has been stated in previous reports of 
the Committee, the difficulty, it is apparent, 
is that a balancing revenue has not been 
provided to pay the expenditures for the 
heavy seasonal benefit payments, and loss 
by payments under the regulations for 
fishermen. 

It is most difficult to estimate how great 
the drain on the Unemployment Insurance 
Fund will be during the forthcoming months. 

It is not safe to estimate that the Fund 
will have a balance of greater than $140,- 
000,000 to $150,000,000 at the end of March 

1961, and should unemployment be higher 
than last winter the Fund may well be 
lower than the figures mentioned. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



123 





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124 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



In addition, after the end of the fiscal 
year March 31st, 1961, there will be heavy 
expenditures, in excess of revenue, due to 
seasonal benefit claims during April and 
May. By the end of May 1961 the Fund 
will possibly be as low as $85,000,000 and 
certainly at a most unsafe level. 

Section 89 (1) of the Unemployment 
Insurance Act specifying the duties of the 
Committee reads in part as follows: 

. . . and shall also make a report to the 
Governor in Council on the financial condition 
of the Fund whenever the advisory committee 
considers that the Fund is or is likely to 
become, and is likely to continue to be, insuffi- 
cient to discharge its liabilities, and may make 
a report on the financial condition of the Fund 
at such other times as the Advisory Committee 
may think fit. 

Section 89 (2) reads in part as follows: 
. . . the report shall contain recommendations 
for such amendments of this Act or the regula- 
tions as the Advisory Committee considers 
appropriate, and an estimate of the effect that 
the amendments recommended will have on 
the financial conditions of the fund. 

In its report of July 8, 1958 the Com- 
mittee reported regarding the drain on the 
Fund, in part as follows: 

The Committee calls attention to the serious 
drain on the Fund created by the heavy load 
of payments during the year. 

Special mention is made of the very heavy 
expenditures which have been required to meet 
the Seasonal Benefit Payments. 

There was, unquestionably a need for the 
special provisions to meet the emergent situa- 
tion last winter. The Committee is gratified to 
find that the benefit payments could be made 
so satisfactorily through the Conmiission offices. 

It is a fact, however, that the burden of this 
expense, in the opinion of the Committee, 
should not be imposed on the Unemployment 
Insurance Fund, unless the loss to the Fund 
is made good. 

We trust that the Government wUl take 
action to replace the drain on the Fund, (by 
reason of extension of the Seasonal Benefit 
Period) by a grant. 

In this connection, attention is called to 
the drain on the Fund by the enactment of 
provisions for payment of benefits to Fishermen. 
In the fiscal year the drain on the Fund is 
reported as four and one-half million dollars. 
In a full year the drain will be ten million 
dollars. 

Repeating previous recommendation, we sub- 
mit, that the loss to the Fund, by extending 
benefits to Fishermen, should be paid from 
sources other than regular contributions. 

In compliance with its statutory duty 
imposed by section 89 of the Unemployment 
Insurance Act the Committee in its July 
1958 report made recommendations and 
paragraphs 31-32 and 33 of the report are 
quoted hereunder. 
Recommendations — Commission Proposals 

The Committee recommend for your favour- 
able consideration the following proposals of 
the Unemployment Insurance Commission: 



1. revise existing schedules of contribution 
and benefit rates by the addition of two new 
classes at the top of the earnings range; read- 
just and consolidate some of the lower classes 
and revise rates of allowable earnings; 

2. provide for elimination of wage ceiling 
of $4800.00 in present Act and substitute 
authority for the Commission to fix a higher 
wage ceiling to suit conditions. 

Recommendations to Stabilize Fund 

There is agreement on the need for additional 
revenue for the fund. Under the Provisions of 
the Act it is the Committee's duty to so inform 
you. 

Recognizing that the original Unemployment 
Insurance Plan has been extended over the 
years: (1) to provide benefits for workers, in 
the winter months, whose periods of contribu- 
tion are intermittent and limited; (2) to extend 
coverage to many classes recognized as poor 
risks; provisions for whom would otherwise 
have fallen on Government, at some level, the 
Committee respectfully recommends that the 
division of responsibility for revenue to the 
Fund as between Employers, Employees and 
Government be adjusted so that the contribution 
from each be made equal; in other words, that 
the contribution from the Government be made 
equal to one-half that of the combined con- 
tributions from Employers and Employees. 

In amplification of the reasons for the recom- 
mendation that the Government contribution be 
increased, attention is called to the following, 
as some of the expenditures, with which the 
Fund has been burdened and for which provi- 
sion for sufficient balancing revenue has not 
been made, — 

1. Benefits for Fishermen, which in a full 
year will create a drain of ten million dollars. 

2. Extension of Seasonal Benefits, which have 
created expenditures double those contem- 
plated. 

3. Inclusion of Lumbering and Logging In- 
dustry. 

4. More generous regulations permitting Sea- 
sonal Workers to obtain benefits more readily. 

5. When coverage has been broadened it has 
had the effect of bringing in groups which 
created a drain on the Fund, for example 
Fresh-water Sailors and Stevedores. 

The rates for contributions were in- 
creased effective September 27, 1959. How- 
ever there was no balancing revenue pro- 
vided to meet the heavy expense of the 
seasonal benefits and the rate of contribu- 
tion to be paid by the Government was 
not increased. 

The increase in contribution rates was 
based on the Actuary's report and the 
theory upon which the actuarial calculations 
were made was that the level of employ- 
ment for the five years 1959 to 1963 inclu- 
sive would equal the average level of the 
five years ended March 31, 1958. This 
theory up to the present has proved to be 
far too optimistic. 

The unemployment benefits have been 
very much higher than provided for by 
the revenue even with the increased rates. 
Added to which is the fact that the expendi- 
tures necessitated by the seasonal benefit 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



125 



requirements have been steadily increasing. 
The loss by inclusion of fishermen has been 
heavy. 

The Committee again met in July 1960 
to consider the standing of the Fund as at 
the end of the fiscal year March 31, 1960. 



Paragraphs of the report are quoted 
below: 

2. The Committee reports that the balance in 
the Unemployment Insurance Fund as at March 
31st, 1960, was $365,892,000. The comparison 
with other years is shown below: 



1960 

Balance at Credit of Unemployment 
Insurance Fund 365,892 



The decrease from 1959 was $139,919,000. 

The balance shown does not represent the 
market value of Securities held. Under the 
existing Bond Market conditions, the value of 
the Balance is 8% to 9% less than that shown. 

The Committee reports its concern regarding 
the rapid decrease in the balance, namely, a 
drop from $859,471,000 in 1956 to $365,892,000 
in 1960. We consider it is now below a safe 
level and there is a danger of it becoming 
insufficient to discharge its liabilities. 

This concern is increased by the fact that 
May 1960 figures show the Fund has dropped 
to $299,293,511.04 and by the end of June 
1960, according to preliminary figures, it will 
show a further decrease of $3 million — the June 
1960 loss being due to loss on sale of Bonds. 

3. The Committee calls special attention to 
two of the several items which create major 
drains on the Fund. The first referred to being: 

(a) Extension of the Seasonal Benefit period 
by two months in each of the last two Winters 
and extension of three and one-half months in 
the Winter of 1957-58. These extensions cost 
$110,208,000 and the expenditure made it neces- 
sary to sell securities at a loss of 8%, making 
the total cost $119,024,000. 

No revenue was provided by Parliament when 
the concessions were granted. We recommend 
that the total cost, namely $119,024,000 paid 
out of the Fund, be replaced by a Government 
Grant. 

We submit, in all fairness to the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Plan, that this replenishment 
should be provided. We respectfully submit that 
Parliament met the emergent condition of sea- 
sonal unemployment prevailing during extended 
periods by instruction that benefits were to be 
paid out of the Unemployment Insurance Fund 
but did not provide for a source of balancing 
revenue to meet the expenditure. We submit 
that the actions proposed would be logical and 
proper and that a grant to the Fund, as pro- 
posed of $119,024,000 would receive general 
approval. 

(b) The second major item of drain on the 
Fund is caused by the extension of coverage to 
the Fishing Industry. The loss to the Fund 
during the past three years has been approx- 
imately $23,000,000. 

It has been the experience of the Commission 
that it is impossible, due to the nature of the 
Industry, to devise Regulations to equitably 
treat unemployment in this Industry under the 
Unemployment Insurance Plan because, in the 
large majority of cases, there is no contract of 
service and, consequently, the control pro- 
visions of the Act are of little value. 

The Committee respectfully recommends that 
assistance to unemployed Fishermen should 
not be financed through the Unemployment 



1959 1958 1957 

(in thousands of dollars) 



499,811 



744,200 



878,441 



1956 



859,471 



Insurance Act and that other means be found 
to finance assistance to Fishermen. 

Part of the $23,000,000 loss to the Fund 
caused by the coverage of the Fishing Industry 
has been included in the cost of extending the 
period for Seasonal Benefits. The balance of the 
loss would approximate $12,000,000. This 
amount it is submitted should also be refunded. 
The total that is requested to be refunded is, 
then, $119,024,000 plus this $12,000,000 balance 
making a total of $131,024,000. 

Conclusions Arrived at October 27, 
1960 Meeting 

As hereinbefore stated the Fund will 
probably be reduced at March 31, 1961, 
to under $150,000,000 and by the end of 
the Seasonal Benefit payments, say at May 
31, 1961, will be not more than $85,000,000. 

The Committee finds no grounds upon 
which to modify the recommendations con- 
tained in its reports of July 8, 1958, and 
July 27, 1960 and respectfully and urgently 
repeats its previous recommendations re- 
garding increasing the Government's con- 
tribution and also replenishing the Fund by 
a grant as recommended in the July 1960 
report. The Committee expresses confidence 
that the Government will take suitable 
action. 

Earnings in Respect of Vacation Periods 

Mr. George Burt, Canadian Director, 
United Automobile Workers, met with the 
Committee by appointment to discuss the 
proposed method for dealing with "Earnings 
in Respect to Vacation Periods". 

He was accompanied by Messrs Mc- 
Donald, Smith, Iverson, and Conway, all 
District officials of the United Automobile 
Workers. 

The contention was that the vacation 
pay should not be considered as earnings 
for more than the vacation period, for 
example — the vacation period might be fixed 
for a two-week period. A man might have 
vacation pay equal to three-weeks earnings. 
If there was a shutdown after the vacation 
period the contention was that unmploy- 
ment insurance benefit should be paid for 
the third and subsequent weeks. 

The Commission's proposal was that, in 
such a case (should the vacation period be 
followed by a shutdown) there would be 



126 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



no unemployment benefit paid for the first 
week of the shutdown since the employee 
would have received vacation pay for a 
three-week period. 

The further statement was made by the 
delegation that in the case of a man who 
had earned vacation pay equal to a period 
less than the vacation period he should be 
paid unemployment benefit for the second 
week of the vacation shutdown, in other 
words, that benefits should be paid in both 
examples. 

The Committee gave the delegation an at- 
tentive hearing and the delegation withdrew. 

This question had been discussed at the 
July 1960 meeting of the Committee. The 
section of the minutes dealing with the 
matter follows: 

31. Earnings in Respect of Vacation Periods — 
Mr. McGregor read a memorandum from the 
Commission stating that an anomalous situation 
had recently arisen with regard to the allocation 
of the earnings of claimants who receive pay 
from their employers in respect of a period of 
vacation shut-down. From November 1958 up 
to the present time, the regulation governing 
this matter had been amended several times 
and, in respect of an amendment made in 
March 1960, confusion and misunderstanding 
had arisen. 

The Commission had decided to suspend the 
March 1960 regulation, and now requested the 
views of the Committee on its proposal to 
restore a regulation put into effect in November 
1958. This regulation had provided that holiday 
pay was to be applied to the whole period 
represented by the pay when pro-rated at the 
employee's normal weekly rate of wages. 

32. It was moved by Mr. Urquhart and 
agreed unanimously that the November 1958 
regulation be restored, effective January 15, 
1961, with the stipulation that Mr. McGregor 
and Mr. Andras confer on the implication 
of the term "usual basic earnings" which 
had been contained in the regulation and, if 
the intention could be better expressed in 
different words, recommend a substitution to 
the Commission, 

Decision 
After considering the representations made 
by Mr. Burt and his Committee, and also 
in consideration of the fact of the previous 
unanimous decision, it was decided not to 
change the decision of July 1960. 

Unemployment Insurance Benefits to 

Persons Aged 65 and Over 
At the July 1960 Meeting the Commis- 
sion presented a memorandum dealing with 
the claims from older workers, reporting 
the heavy incidence of such claims, their 
long average duration and the financial 
drains arising therefrom. The problems of 
placing older workers was detailed in the 
report, and reasons given for the doubt 
that many really were seeking work, rather 
that they were not simply applying for 
work in order to obtain benefits. 



The Commission, at the July 1960 meet- 
ing, made three suggestions for considera- 
tion, as follows: 

1. To treat a claimant's income from an 
industrial pension as earnings for benefit pur- 
poses. 

2. As an alternative, to discontinue coverage 
after an insured person was within a stated 
number of years of retiring age. 

3. As another alternative, to require any 
person who becomes a claimant after he has 
gone on pension or reached retiring age (for 
example, 65) to requalify wholly on contribu- 
tions made after that date, as evidence of 
attachment to the labour market. 

There was a full discussion at the July 
1960 meeting, but no agreement. 

The "employee members" expressed the 
firm view that the situation had not changed 
since the discussion in 1948 and 1949. It 
had been acknowledged then that to cut a 
man off benefit because he drew a pension 
was the same as to apply a means test, 
which has no proper place under an unem- 
ployment insurance plan. It was said that, 
as a man passes age 50, it becomes ex- 
ceedingly difficult for him to find a job. 
They felt that the Commission had been 
very efficient in its administration, i.e., in 
getting pensioners who do not wish to 
work off its benefit rolls. They were in 
agreement in urging the Commission not 
to discriminate because of age and empha- 
sized that many people of age 65 or over 
just cannot go out and get a job for 15 
weeks to requalify for benefit. 

The "employer members" were in favour 
of some control which would eliminate the 
man who was not actually seeking work. 
They were of the opinion that there were 
many who were drawing benefits, who were 
being paid retirement pensions and Old 
Age Security pensions who were not really 
in the labour market. 

The question was laid over until the 
October meeting, with a request that the 
Commission ascertain how other countries 
dealt with this problem. 

At the October Meeting the Commission 
reported regarding other countries as sum- 
marized hereunder: — 

1. The I.L.O. report (issued in 1955) said 
"it is sometimes desirable to exclude persons 
above a certain age from the coverage of unem- 
ployment insurance". 

2. The I.L.O. report pointed out that virtually 
all countries provide for disqualification from 
unemployment benefit when applicant was in 
receipt of one or more types of other social 
security benefits. 

3. The I.L.O. report also points out that a 
number of the existing unemployment benefit 
schemes contain exclusion based on age. 

4. In regard to the United States the rules 
vary in the different States, nearly half of 
the States treat pensions as earnings, which has 
the effect of reducing Insurance payments. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



127 



In view of the unbalanced attendance 
(only two "employee members"), no con- 
clusion of the problem could be reached 
at the October meeting. 

It was decided, however, to give par- 
ticulars of the problem in this report and 
to state the matter would be further dis- 
cussed at the next meeting. 

In the meantime the Commission staff 
was fully aware of the problem and was 
doing what it could to eliminate improper 
claims. 

All members of the Committee believe 
that persons really anxious for employment 
and capable for work, who have contributed 
for benefits should not be denied them. 
Nevertheless they are gravely concerned 
about the improper claims and the drain on 
the Fund. It is hoped the Commission can 
devise an administrative procedure which 
will stop fraudulent claims; at the same 
time the Committee has full appreciation 
of the difficulties, when the opportunity of 
testing applicants by referring them to work 
is not always available. 

Impact of Payment of Benefits to 
Married Women 
Consideration was given to a Commission 
memorandum outlining the history of the 
regulation formerly applied as a test of the 
availability and willingness of married 
women to work, the revocation of this 
regulation and the ensuing increase in the 
amount and volume of married women 
claims, and suggesting several possible reme- 
dies for the serious situation which had 
developed. The Dominion Bureau of Statis- 
tics showed that claims from married women 
were proportionately greater in volume and 
amount than claims from single women, 
and exhaustions of benefit rights were con- 
siderably more numerous. This led to the 
conclusion that, because of the responsibili- 
ties of marriage, children and the care of a 
home, and because of the lessened necessity 
of receiving an income from working, many 
married women, particularly in the age 
group 25 to 44, are claiming benefit when 
they are really unemployed and available 
for work, or unable to find work. Possible 
remedies suggested by the Commission 
were: 

1. A married woman could be allowed a 
voluntary exemption from payment of contri- 
butions. 

2. A married woman could be excluded from 
receiving benefit if her husband was employed. 

3. Regulations along the lines of those pre- 
viously in effect could be reintroduced. (This 
would only affect recently married women and 
would not deal with the problem of the woman 
who re-enters the labour market after her 
children are of school age.) 



4. A married woman could be disqualified 
as not available for employment if she had 
children under school age (five years of age or 
under). 

5. A married woman could be required to 
establish qualification wholly on contributions 
made after marriage. 

The problem has been discussed at every 
meeting of the Committee, without an 
agreement being reached on a recommenda- 
tion which would be unanimous. 

The "employer members" favour rein- 
statement of the regulation providing that 
a woman after marriage should be required 
to prove attachment to the labour force by 
a period of employment before she would 
be considered for benefit payments. There 
is no reason, however, to believe that such 
a regulation would be any more acceptable 
than was that previously revoked at Gov- 
ernment level because of strong objections 
on the ground that it was discriminative. 

The "employee members" believe the 
problem is an administrative responsibility 
and favour more referrals to the Boards of 
Referees of the cases where there is con- 
viction that the applicant for employment 
is simply interested in obtaining unemploy- 
ment benefits. 

Until the Committee reaches agreement, 
a recommendation based on a divided 
opinion of the members of the Committee 
is, obviously, inadvisable in view of the 
circumstances which brought about the re- 
vocation of the previous regulation. 

This problem is, of course, one common 
to all countries where unemployment insur- 
ance is in effect. Attached to the report 
are some notes on the practices of other 
countries. 

Some of the provisions in other coun- 
tries are quite similar to the married women 
regulations which were applicable for several 
years in Canada and which were revoked 
in 1957. 

The Unemployment Insurance Code for 
the State of California, in 1955 passed a 
section applicable to both men and women 
who leave employment to be married or 
because of marital duties. The section 
restricted their right to claim benefits. 

Making the section of the Code applic- 
able to men and women was probably to 
circumvent charges of discrimination but 
the restrictions would seldom apply to 
men. 

One proposal which seemed to members 
of the Committee worth a trial wias that 
the practice be followed of referring cases 
where there was good grounds for believing 
the applicant was seeking benefits rather 
than employment to the Board of Referees. 



128 



THE LABOUR GAICTTE • FEBRUARY ?96l 



To make such a plan work there would 
require to be less formality about cases 
before the Boards, and an understanding 
that it was an opinion which was desired 
rather than a firm decision. 

There is the strong probability that a 
requirement of this kind would mean that 
many improper applications would dis- 
appear. 

The officials of the Commission and the 
members of the Commission were not im- 
pressed with the proposal. Based on exper- 
ience they were inclined to the view the 
Boards v/ould favour the applicants unless 
proof was given they did not want work. 
When there were no jobs available, they 
asked "how can proof be obtained?" The 
Committee believes that the responsibility 
for proof should rest with the applicant. 

The Committee is very anxious that 
every possible means be taken to strengthen 
the authority of the Commission and its 
staff so that the objectives of the legisla- 
tion may be fulfilled, e.g., "that those 
persons seeking employment who are eligi- 
ble for benefits be given prompt payments, 
but that those who make false claims are 
denied benefits and those knowingly guilty 
of fraud are punished." 

The Committee will continue its study 
of the problem, and it is confident that the 
Commission will also give it constant atten- 
tion. The drain on the Fund is considerable 
and warrants the matter being reported. 
Means must be found to check the improper 
claims. It is hoped a method of strengthening 
the administrative procedure may result 
which would be much more satisfactory 
than the adoption of a regulation which 
could be claimed to discriminate against 
women. 

Staff 

The Committee wishes to record its 
appreciation of the action of the Minister 
and the Government in granting authority 
to the Commission to increase its supervisory 
staff and to increase the number of enforce- 
ment officers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. MacNamara, 

Chairman. 
Report Approved by 

Alan Y. Eaton 

James Hunter 

H. Shoobridge 

T. C. Urquhart 

A. Andras 

J. G. McLean 

S. A. Stephens 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 

92006-6—3 



Memorandum Containing Notes on 
Provisions in Unemployment In- 
surance Practices Regarding Women 
Who Leave Employment Because 
of Marital ResponsibUities. 
France and New Zealand 

These countries pay unemployment assistance, 
as their schemes of protection against unem- 
ployment are not insurance schemes. In both 
countries, a married woman is disqualified from 
receiving an unemployment allowance if her 
husband is able to maintain her. 
Belgium 

There are two forms of control: 

1. Except for a few limited categories, daily 
reporting is required of unemployment insur- 
ance benefit claimants, whether male or female. 

2. Any unemployed woman claiming benefit 

(a) as a qualifying condition must attend 
where appropriate the general or special train- 
ing courses in accordance with the terms laid 
down by the Minister of Labour; 

(b) may either be disqualified or have her 
previous credits cancelled and be required to 
re-establish qualification through a further 
period of insurable employment if she has 
refused suitable employment, or left employ- 
ment without just cause, or been dismissed due 
to circumstances within her control. 
Germany (Federal Republic) 

The unemployment insurance law exempts 
married women: — 

(a) in home industries with low earnings 
(not over a specified monetary amount per 
week), and 

(b) in any employment ordinarily not ex- 
ceeding 24 hours a week or paid not more 
than a specified small monetary amount per 
week (the provisions of (b) apply to any 
employee whether male or female). 

The Netherlands 

A claimant whether male or female cannot 
qualify for benefit unless such claimant is the 
breadwinner for the household. The income of 
other members of the claimant's household is 
taken into account and is verified by enquiry 
at the home. 
Ireland 

A married woman must have paid 26 contri- 
butions after marriage to qualify under the 
general scheme. For this, the ordinary require- 
ment is similar to that of the United Kingdom 
(i.e. 26 weeks of contributions paid since first 
entry into insurance and 50 weeks of contribu- 
tions paid or credited in the preceding con- 
tribution year, with a reduced rate of benefi 
payable if the number of contributions paid 
or credited is less than 50, but at least 26). 
Britain 

A married woman who, although working, 
elects not to be insured is exempted from 
payment of national insurance contributions. 
This provision is based on the principle that 
unemployment insurance is unnecessary for 
people who are prima facie not dependent on 
employment for their own livelihood. 

Since the national insurance contribution 
(covering unemployment, sickness, old age, 
etc.) is a sizable weekly amount, nearly fifty 
per cent of married women in employment in 
Britain take advantage of the exemption and 
rely on their husband's insurance. Those who 
elect to be insured are apparently eligible for 
benefit without any special restrictions. 



129 



United States 

The individual State unemployment insurance 
laws differ in their provisions but a large 
number place restrictions on the payment of 
benefit where 1. unemployment is due to mari- 
tal obligations (21 States) and 2. unemployment 
is due to pregnancy (35 States). 

1. Marital Obligations. A claimant who leaves 
work voluntarily because of marital obligations 
(including leaving to get married) is deemed 
unavailable for employment in five States and 
is disqualified in 16 States. (In two of these 
the disqualification is limited, in the other 14 
it is for the duration of the unemployment). 
However, in numerous States the disqualifica- 
tion or presumption of non-availability follow- 
ing such separation is removed in the following 
circumstances: 

(a) if the claimant has again worked a 
specified period (e.g. 5-14 weeks in Maine) 



or has earned a specified amount (e.g. $200 
in Indiana); 

(b) if the claimant has become employed 
in bona fide employment (e.g. California, Illi- 
nois); 

(c) if the claimant has served a specified 
disqualification period (e.g. 10 weeks in Colo- 
rado); 

(d) if the claimant has become the main 
support of her family (e.g. California, Min- 
nesota). 

In some States, (e.g. Minnesota) all wage 
credits are cancelled if the claimant was dis- 
missed because of the employer's rule against 
retaining married women in his employ. This 
cancellation of credits is not applicable if the 
claimant leaves to join her husband in his 
new residence and immediately upon arrival 
enters into the labour market and makes rea- 
sonable efforts to obtain work. 



5th Annual Convention of the 

Quebec Federation of Labour 

Unemployment and formation of new political party given most prominence during 
three-day meeting. Resolution favouring new party adopted almost unanimously 



{Translation) 

The formation of a new political party 
and increasing unemployment were the two 
most important subjects to come under 
discussion by the delegates to the 5th annual 
convention of the Quebec Federation of 
Labour (CLC), which took place in Quebec 
November 17 to 19. 

Of about 500 delegates present, almost all 
were in favour of the formation of a new 
political party, and several union heads who 
at last year's convention had been opposed 
to such a project announced that they were 
now completely convinced of the necessity 
of such action. 

An evening was devoted to a study period 
on the new party. 

The resolution that gave rise to the most 
lively discussion, however, was that recom- 
mending the exchange of labour delegations 
between Canada and Communist countries. 
By a strong majority, the delegates reversed 
the decision of the resolutions committee, 
which had recommended rejection of this 
resolution. 

During the three-day convention, delegates 
studied more than 200 resolutions dealing 
with a wide variety of subjects, ranging from 
respect for the rights of man to health 
insurance, as well as the necessity of forming 
a Department of Education in the province 
of Quebec. 

At the end of the convention, the dele- 
gates re-elected the entire outgoing executive 
committee by acclamation. 



Two provincial ministers, Hon. Rene 
Hamel, Minister of Labour, and Hon. Rene 
Levesque, Minister of Public Works, were 
present. 

The convention was opened by J. B. 
Hurens, President of the Quebec Labour 
Board. Gerard Moisan, acting Mayor of 
Quebec, and Roland Barette, of the Co- 
operative Council of Quebec, also spoke. 

The International Confederation of Free 
Trade Unions sent a fraternal delegate, 
Roger Dekeyzer, President of the Interna- 
tional Union of Transport Workers and a 
senator in the Belgian Govermnent. 

The President of the Canadian Labour 
Congress, Claude Jodoin, also spoke. 

Roger Provost 

Economic planning, a policy of govern- 
ment controlled economy, is the only means 
that can produce full employment, declared 
QFL President Roger Provost in his opening 
address. 

Only the Government can set this mech- 
anism in action, he added, but specified that 
it would not be necessary to nationalize 
industries in order to assure this planning 
on a national scale, but rather to nationalize 
initiative. 

Economic planning, a policy of govern- 
ment controlled economy, is the only means 
that can produce full employment, declared 
QFL President Roger Provost in his opening 
address. 

"It matters little whether this measure is 
called planning, state controlled economy, 
or socialism. What we are interested in 



130 



THB LABOUR GAZETTB • FEBRUARY 7967 




— Federal Photos, Montreal. 

Executive of the Quebec Federation of Labour, all re-elected for another term in 1961, 
left to right: Adrian Gagnier, Treasurer; Edouard Larose, Vice-President; Roger Provost, 
President; Jean Gerin-Lajoie, Vice-President; and John Purdie, Secretary. 



doing is finding, within the framework of 
Canadian political democracy, the means of 
securing work for the thousands of unem- 
ployed persons who do not know what to 
do with themselves." 

In his 4,000-word speech, the President 
touched on only two subjects: unemploy- 
ment and the formation of a new political 
party. 

He reiterated that the labour movement 
does not wish to form a labour party. 

"We wish to contribute to the formation 
of a political party in which will be included 
farmers, members of co-operatives, citizens 
with liberal views, and workers," he said. 

Mr. Provost denied the existence of a 
two-party system in Canada at the present 
time, and stated that the workers are striv- 
ing for the formation of a new political 
party, "not out of any lust for power, but 
from a strong desire to accomplish their 
self-imposed mission, that of making this 
country truly democratic." 

Mr. Provost stressed the necessity for 
Quebec to be represented when the new 
party is created. "The province of Quebec 
has its own characteristics, traditions, and 
culture. Therefore, it is essential that in the 
new party it be given the opportunity to 
work toward the full development of its 
culture and personality." 

We acknowledge the political freedom 
of each worker who is a member of this 
Federation, Mr. Provost said, but every day 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



we realize more and more that problems of 
unemployment, social security, and many 
others can only be solved by a new party, 
and that it is the personal responsibility of 
each worker to contribute toward giving 
the workers the instrument they need to 
reach their legitimate goals. 

The New Party 

The delegates decided by an almost unani- 
mous vote to take an active part in the 
foundation of a new political party. The 
500 delegates decided, with great enthusiasm, 
to approve this project, on both the federal 
and provincial levels, and to send a large 
delegation to the founding meeting in 
Ottawa next August, so that the interests 
of Quebec would be taken into account 
when the new party was formed. 

The convention accepted the recom- 
mendations made by the Federation's repre- 
sentatives on the committee on the formation 
of a new party, which stated that: 

1. The Quebec Federation of Labour should 
support and adopt the same resolutions con- 
cerning political action as were passed at the 
CLC convention in Montreal last April (L.G., 
June 1960, p. 562) and in Winnipeg in 1958 
(L.G. 1958, p. 589) providing for union par- 
ticipation in the formation of the new party; 

2. The QFL should co-operate with the pro- 
vincial committee in sending a representative 
delegation from Quebec to the national meeting 
for the creation of the new party in Ottawa 
in August; 



131 



92006-6— 3i 



3. The QFL should co-operate with the pro- 
vincial committee in creating an efficient 
organization in connection with constituencies 
and professional organization, with a view to 
the next federal elections; 

4. The QFL should co-operate with the 
provincial committee in the preparation and 
organization of a meeting to form the new 
political party at the provincial level, with a 
view to assuring adequate representation for the 
workers of Quebec; 

5. The QFL should co-operate with the 
provincial committee to create an efficient 
organization in connection with constituencies 
and professional organization, with a view to 
the next provincial elections; 

6. The QFL should try to get its members 
to give full support to the forthcoming sub- 
scription campaign to the amount of one dollar 
per member . . . 

Many persons who in the past had shown 
opposition to political action on the part 
of unions have changed their opinion, and 
are now in favour of action within the 
Federation. 

The way was prepared by holding a study 
meeting the day before, sponsored by the 
Education Committee, to give precise infor- 
mation on the nature of the program, and on 
the structure of the new party. About 20 
delegates spoke at this session, none of whom 
was categorically opposed to the project. 

Robert Lavoie, of the International Asso- 
ciation of Machinists, said he would support 
the creation of a new party as long as the 
financial resources of the unions were not 
involved. Leopold Lavoie, of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, 
agreed, and advocated that financial partici- 
pation by union members remain voluntary. 

A representative of the Oil, Chemical and 
Atomic Workers' International Union, Fer- 
nand Daoust, appealed to all union members 
in Quebec, and to citizens of the entire 
working class in the province, to give full 
support to the creation of the new party. 

In addition, Jean Philip, of the United 
Textile Workers, stressed the fact that the 
workers were the group with the most 
experience in democracy, on account of 
their union activities, and said that this 
experience should be used to give Canada 
a truly democratic political party. 

Unemployment 

The problem of unemployment was 
studied at great length by the delegates in 
the course of the three-day convention. A 
number of resolutions were adopted. 

The main resolution put forth suggests 
two types of solutions, immediate and long- 
term, to the problem of unemployment. 

Immediate solutions suggested were: 

— Starting of all kinds of projects by the 
municipal, provincial and federal govern- 
ments; 



— Establishment of a system of quotas 
to control the importation of foreign goods 
which compete unfairly with Canadian 
products; 

— ^Amendment of the Municipal Winter 
Works Incentive Program so that federal 
and provincial grants will cover the cost 
of materials as well as labour, and so that 
this assistance may be made available for 
the year round. 

Suggested long-term solutions were: 

— Adoption of a controlled economy that 
would provide for the development of all 
our resources, and the maintenance of full 
employment; 

— Nationalization of public services; 

— Installation in Quebec and the Mari- 
time Provinces of factories for the processing 
of our raw materials; 

— Creation of numerous trade schools for 
the training of specialized workers. 

The convention also requested that the 
Federation form a committee of five mem- 
bers whose function would be: 

— To investigate the employment situa- 
tion by region and industry; 

— ^To supervise the application of the 
Unemployment Insurance Act and the func- 
tioning of various divisions and offices of 
the Unemployment Insurance Commission; 

— ^To make representations to members of 
the boards of referees and the advisory 
committees; 

— ^To draw up a policy for the benefit of 
the working class in reference to unemploy- 
ment and full employment, as well as a 
program for education and action, and to 
submit it in its entirety to the QFL Execu- 
tive Committee. 

The delegates also recommended measures 
such as subsidiaries to industry and con- 
struction during winter, the establishment 
of refineries and factories in Quebec for 
the processing of iron ore, the buying of 
products made in Canada, and the negotia- 
tion of a reciprocity agreement with the 
United States in order to eliminate the 
tariffs imposed by the United States 
Congress. 

Several delegates suggested additional 
remedies. Raymond Lapointe, of the United 
Steelworkers of America, declared that 
Canada must have complete control over 
her credit in order to solve the problem of 
unemployment. He also suggested nationali- 
zation of chartered banks. One of the 
Vice-Presidents of the Federation, Jean 
Gerin-Lajoie, stressed the necessity of 
developing secondary industries. Fernand 
Daoust, of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic 
Workers' International Union, advocated the 
organization of mass demonstrations and 
marches on government centres. 



132 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



Unemployment Insurance 

The delegates requested that unemploy- 
ment insurance benefits be established on a 
basis of 52 weeks a year wherever a person 
is available for employment, willing to 
work, and is unable to find suitable work. 

At the same time, they requested that 
benefits be based on 75 per cent of the 
claimant's wages. 

Other resolutions passed by the convention 
requested that all hospital employees be 
eligible for unemployment insurance, and 
that a job, in order to be considered accept- 
able under the Act, carry wages and working 
conditions at least equal to those established 
by a collective agreement negotiated by a 
bona fide union. 

Emile Boudreau, of the United Steel- 
workers of America, declared that govern- 
ments "will only settle the problem of 
unemployment when it becomes too much 
of a financial drain on them." 

The President of the Montreal Labour 
Council, Louis Laberge, criticized those 
"who make protests when they see that the 
unemployment insurance funds are diminish- 
ing, but who have no thoughts for those 
who are out of work." 

Exchange of Union Delegations with U.S.S.R. 

The liveliest discussion of the entire con- 
vention centred on the question of the 
exchange of delegations between Canada 
and the U.S.S.R. 

The resolutions committee recommended 
rejection of a resolution, submitted by Local 
505 of the International Woodworkers of 
America, in favour of exchanges between 
Canada and Communist countries, but the 
convention rejected this recommendation. 

The delegates who spoke in favour of 
such exchanges asserted that we would never 
achieve peaceful coexistence by isolating 
ourselves from Communistic organizations. 

"If a war which might destroy the world 
is to be prevented, the two camps must 
become better acquainted with one another," 
said Jean-Marie Bedard, of the International 
Woodworkers of America. 

Several delegates asserted that it was a 
good thing for Canadian workers to see 
for themselves what the situation is in 
Russia. 

Those who did not approve of the sug- 
gested exchanges stated that in Russia there 
are no free unions as we understand the 
term in North America, and that it is not 
necessary to continually send visitors behind 
the Iron Curtain to see what is going on 
there. 

The Chairman of the resolutions com- 
mittee, Louis Laberge, said that this policy 



should come under the jurisdiction of the 
International Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions. 

Other Resolutions 

The delegates also passed resolutions re- 
questing, among other things, that 

— ^The amount of basic personal income- 
tax exemption be raised to $1,500; 

— ^The sales tax be abolished; 

— ^The federal Government adopt an im- 
migration policy that would provide for 
the integration of immigrants in the national 
employment program; 

— The provincial Government create a 
Department of Education, and that educa- 
tion be free at all levels; 

— Quebec institute a complete health 
insurance scheme; 

— The provincial Government bring in 
compulsory car insurance; 

— Quebec nationalize hydro-electric serv- 
ices; 

— The minimum wages for all loggers be 
raised to $1.50 an hour; 

— ^The minimum wages for any work 
be $1.00; 

— Public service employees be given the 
right to strike; 

— Capital punishment be abolished; 

— Provincial government employees be 
given the right of association; 

— All discrimination, whether for reasons 
of race, colour, religion, ethnic origin, or 
age, be forbidden; 

— ^The provincial Government pass legis- 
lation granting equal pay for equal work. 

Guest Speakers 

Hon. Rene Hamel 

One of the most serious problems in the 
field of labour-management relations was 
that of delays on the part of the labour 
Relations Board, asserted Hon. Rene Hamel, 
provincial Minister of Labour. He said there 
were at the moment hundreds and hundreds 
of cases waiting to be considered; he pro- 
mised to remedy this situation. 

Mr. Hamel also reminded those present 
that the Superior Labour Council was, at 
that very time, studying a proposed labour 
code, and promised that the provincial 
Government would pass legislation along 
those lines as soon as possible. 

Hon. Rene Levesque 

The Minister of Public Works for Quebec, 
Hon. Rene Levesque, warned the QFL 
against the pessimism that is presently lead- 
ing its members to create a new political 
party. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



133 



speaking at the banquet at the close of 
the convention, on the very day when it 
had been decided by an almost unanimous 
vote to participate in the creation of a new 
political party, the Minister asked union 
members to have confidence in the new 
provincial Government. 

He stressed the fact that the new Govern- 
ment of Quebec was sympathetic to the 
cause of the working man "in a way that 
no previous Government has ever been." 
He told the delegates that their requests for 
reform of the Labour Relations Board, for 
a labour code, and for equal wages, among 
other things, would be granted. 

Mr. Levesque said that union members 
should not be absent from meetings, or let 
themselves be drawn into a new partisanship 
that could ruin the present climate. "You 
must strive to keep some doors open," he 
said. 

When unions become powerful organiza- 
tions, they must not forget that the union 
exists for its members, rather than the 
members existing for the syndicate, he said. 

Claude Jodoin 

CLC President Claude Jodoin denounced 
provincial leaders who were attacking labour 
unions, and warned the QFL that it would 
have to be on guard if it wished to prevent 
damaging labour legislation. 

Mr. Jodoin said that private enterprise 
could not exist without unions — ^free unions 
— and reminded the convention that free 
unions are the safeguard of democracy, and 
that wherever a dictatorship is set up, the 
first action of the regime is to abolish free 
trade unions. 

The President of the CLC asked the 
Government to wage a war against unem- 
ployment, and suggested deficit financing in 
order to stimulate the Canadian economy, 
and thereby remedy the present economic 
crisis. 

Mr. Jodoin requested that the QFL bring 
pressure to bear on the Government of the 
province to recognize civil service associa- 
tions. 

Roger Dekeyzer 

There is no doubt that the best workshop 
in which to mould a true democracy is the 
free trade union, declared Roger Dekeyzer 
of Belgium, President of the International 
Federation of Transport Workers, and fra- 
ternal delegate of the International Con- 
federation of Free Trade Unions. 

"Industrially advanced countries can pour 
billions and billions of dollars into under- 
developed countries," he said, "but there 



is no guarantee that the countries concerned 
will develop along stable, democratic lines, 
and become part of what we call 'the free 
world', if the benefactors do not sow the 
seeds of democratic institutions which will 
meet the needs and aspirations of the masses 
of the population." 

Mr. Dekeyzer, who is a Senator in his 
native country, declared that national indep- 
endence is not a remedy for all evils, nor 
an end in itself, but simply the opportunity 
to satisfy legitimate aspirations. 

He recalled that at the time of the found- 
ing of the ICFTU in 1949, Africa was 
represented by three organizations with 
fewer than 30,000 members, whereas today 
the ICFTU has 22 unions in Africa, with 
more than 1,250,000 members. 

The development of the ICFTU into a 
world-wide union movement is mainly due 
to our skill in bringing together in one 
large world organization people from the 
four corners of the earth, differing in race, 
religion, and political convictions. "What 
unites us", he continued, "is our faith that 
we are serving the interests of all nations. 
We are united by a common belief in true 
democracy, and by our love of freedom 
of the individual and the nation." 

Elections 

Roger Provost was re-elected President 
of the QFL by acclamation. It is his fifth 
consecutive term of office. 

The other members of the Executive 
Committee were also re-elected by acclama- 
tion Edouard Larose and Jean Gerin-Lajoie, 
General Vice-Presidents; John Purdie, Secre- 
tary; and Adrien Gagnier, Treasurer. 

The delegates also chose six industrial 
vice-presidents and nine regional vice- 
presidents, who form part of the Executive 
Committee. 

The industrial vice-presidents are: Fernand 
Daoust, manufacturing industries; Jean-Paul 
Menard, wood, paper, and construction; 
Maurice Silcoff, textiles; H. J. Desroches, 
transportation and transport equipment; 
Roland Goedike, food; and Gerard Poirier, 
mining and metallurgy. 

The regional vice-presidents are: Rene 
Mondou, Andre Thibodeau and Aldo 
Caluori, Montreal region; Roger Perreault, 
Northern Quebec; Benoit Laviolette, Ga- 
tineau and Laurentians; Jean Philip, South 
Shore and Eastern Townships; Oscar Long- 
tin, Southern Quebec; J. B. Hurens, City of 
Quebec and district; and A. C. Robindaine, 
St. Maurice district. 



134 



THE LABOUR GAZETTB • FEBRUARY 7961 



Sixteenth Annual Convention of the 

Professional Association of Industrialists 

Quebec employer organization gives most attention at two-day meeting to subject 
ot profit-sliaring, whicli it has had under study for year. Outgoing President 
voices concern over state of small business and secondary industry in Canada 



The Professional Association of Indus- 
trialists, an employers' organization in the 
province of Quebec, held its 16th annual 
convention at Quebec from November 16 
to 18. 

Although the theme of the convention 
was "Private Enterprise in the Service of 
the Community," much more attention was 
given to the question of profit-sharing. 

The PAI has, in fact, studied the problem 
during the year with a view to integrating 
such efforts into the industrial framework 
of the province of Quebec. 

At the close of the convention, Fernand 
Girouard, of Montreal, Vice-President and 
General Manager of Volcano Limited, and 
Vice-President of the PAI, was named 
General President. 

President's Address 

Lucien Arcand, outgoing President of the 
PAI, stated that the small or average con- 
cern needed a kind of brain trust it could 
call upon at any time, and a system of 
middle-term loans that would permit it to 
develop without losing control over its 
business. 

Reviewing the economic situation, the 
President stressed that Canada was going 
through a period of structural unemploy- 
ment brought about by the fact that our 
economy was not developing quickly enough 
to provide jobs for all those who were in 
need of them. 

He deplored the fact that Canada was 
becoming known more and more as a raw 
material producing country and that im- 
ported goods were supplanting local products 
to an increasing extent on the Canadian 
market. 

"Secondary industry is not attracting 
enough attention from government authori- 
ties," said Mr. Arcand. 

He reiterated a criticism made by the 
President of the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association to the effect that the present 
tariff structure in Canada was not realistic 
enough since, in many cases, it placed 
Canadian products in an inferior position 
to those from low-living-standard or mass- 
production countries. 

Mr. Arcand declared that the small or 
average concern had need for a group of 
experts whose services it could engage for 



some time to help reorganize its various 
departments on a scientific basis. He made 
it clear that the small concern could not 
pay the salaries offered by big business, 
and could not afford to engage the services 
of experts all the year round. 

The second handicap of the small concern 
was the scarcity of capital, explained Mr. 
Arcand. 

"For short-iterm funds," he said, "small 
and medium concerns depend on bank credit 
more than does big business. When money 
is tight, as happens periodically in Canada, 
this type of concern, which may be in full 
expansion, will often be subjected to intol- 
erable pressure and be forced to curtail its 
activities." 

Having stressed that financing by means 
of debentures was very difficult, in fact 
almost impossible, and that an increase in 
capital was possible only under exorbitant 
conditions which often led to control of the 
business, Mr. Arcand expressed the hope 
that a system of middle-term loans would 
be established. 

"What the medium-sized concern really 
needs is a kind of middle-term loan, refund- 
able in five or ten years, which will allow 
it to renew its equipment, and long-term 
credit so that it may expand without losing 
control." 

He added that such credit could normally 
be granted by institutions similar to some 
European banks (banques d'affaires). 

Mr. Arcand concluded by saying that 
if government were really convinced that 
the part played by the small and average 
concerns were of prime importance in our 
economy, they would not hesitate to aid 
them. 

"These concerns, thanks to the fact that 
they have been decentralized, are providing 
industrial employment in certain areas 
which would otherwise offer no oppor- 
tunities," he said. 

Philosophy of Profit-Sharing 

"Profit-sharing, as a means to labour- 
management co-operation, will become 
increasingly important as industrial com- 
petition between the U.S.S.R. and the 
West increases", said Bertram L. Metzger, 
Director of the Profit Sharing Research 
Foundation of Evanston, 111. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



135 



Mr. Metzger defined profit-sharing as 
"any method which brings about an increase 
in production and a decrease in cost price, 
resulting from human co-operation which 
can be obtained by direct participation of 
employees (in addition to their regular 
wages) in the total results of the enterprise 
as measured in terms of profits." 

In his opinion, profit-sharing must develop 
into a new philosophy which will guide 
business administration. 

The speaker borrowed from the American 
economist, John Bates Clark, the division 
of industrial relations into four phases, 
namely: rivalry, arbitration, sharing and 
co-operation. 

Mr. Metzger noted that the major part of 
industrial relations was taking place at the 
level of the first phase, but he pointed out 
that "an increasing number of company 
heads who sincerely want to find a solution 
to the present social and economic prob- 
lems are gradually turning towards profit 
sharing and co-operation. This is an en- 
couraging sign". 

External and internal forces. were pushing 
employers and workers to seek co-operation, 
said Mr. Metzger, adding that: 

In addition, we must not forget that Com- 
munism in itself constitutes a force which is 
driving the capitalistic system toward a con- 
ception of industrial relations based on co- 
operation. As competition becomes progressively 
keener between the Soviet Union and the 
Western World, employers and employees will 
be less and less able to assume the enormous 
expenses of waging a perpetual conflict between 
themselves. In this connection, profit-sharing 
and various forms of labour-management co- 
operation will inevitably have to play an 
increasingly important part in industrial rela- 
tions. 

Mr. Metzger held that collective bar- 
gaining must become more than a mere 
method of settling difi'erences. It must be a 



means of communication between employers 
and workers. 

"We must at all costs abandon the idea 
of conflict in industrial relations so that 
we may draw nearer to an idea of co-opera- 
tion," he said. "But as we approach this 
ideal, we will have to create new industrial 
relations techniques." 

In conclusion, he suggested that the new 
techniques to be adopted should inevitably 
include, among others, cash payment profit- 
sharing plans, employee share-buying plans, 
and trusts in which the employees' profits 
may be deposited. 

Canadian Legislation and Profit-Sharing Plans 

Raymond Normandeau, C.A., Quebec 
City, analysed the Canadian legislation as 
regards profit-sharing plans, and dealt with 
the bill then before the House of Commons 
concerning this matter. 

He concluded that the Canadian legisla- 
tion on income tax tended more toward 
encouraging the taxpayer to save money, 
through various long-standing methods, and 
also by more specific provisions on profit- 
sharing plans. 

He examined Bill C-84, by which the 
Income Tax Act may be amended in con- 
nection with profit-sharing plans, and he 
noted certain improvements, but also some 
gaps, especially concerning the amounts 
which the employees wished to contribute 
to their own pension fund. 

Executive Committee 

In addition to Mr. Girouard, General 
President, the Executive Committee of the 
PAI includes: Jean-Louis Lachance, Quebec, 
First Vice-President; Jean Brunelle, Mont- 
real, Second Vice-President; Bertrand Lang- 
lois, Terrebonne, Treasurer; and Jacques 
Brillant, Rimouski, Secretary. 



Trainmen, Conductors Planning to Amalgamate 



Leaders of the Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen and the Order of Railway Con- 
ductors and Brakemen have approved a 
formula for amalgamation. The proposal 
will be submitted to members of both 
unions for approval. 

Conventions of both organizations last 
year adopted resolutions supporting the 
principle of amalgamation. 



A joint statement by W. P. Kennedy, 
President of the Trainmen, and James A. 
Paddock, President of the Conductors, 
announced the agreement on the formula. 

The Trainmen have a Canadian member- 
ship of about 22,500 in 116 Canadian 
locals; the Conductors, about 700 in 16 
locals. 



136 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



National Business Conference on Employment 

Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce and Canadian Cliamber of Commerce are sponsors 
of one-day conference. The Minister of Labour speaks at conference luncheon 



A one-day conference on employment, 
co-sponsored by The Winnipeg Chamber 
of Commerce and The Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, was held in Winnipeg on 
January 23. Theme of the conference was 
"An Expanding Economy — Key to Employ- 
ment." 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, 
was the speaker at the conference luncheon. 
Leonard Hynes, Chairman of the Executive 
Council, The Canadian Chamber of Com- 
merce, gave the keynote address. George 
De Young, President, Atlas Limited, spoke 
on "Canadian Application of European 
Experience." 

The Minister of Labour 

"It is a mistake to suggest that any one 
measure will provide a solution to all 
economic problems; what is required is a 
comprehensive program that involves a cer- 
tain amount of planning on all levels of 
government, industry and labour for the 
years ahead," Hon. Michael Starr, Minister 
of Labour, told the conference's luncheon 
meeting. 

"It is no longer a case of government 
going it alone, of industry going it alone, 
and labour going it alone. 

"The achievement of future economic and 
social objectives will require a degree of 
co-operation and consultation among gov- 
ernment, industrial and labour leaders in 
order to maintain high productivity and to 
keep Canadian industry competitive," he 
said. 

One place for combined action was the 
provision of increased training for Cana- 
dian workers, the Minister continued. "Here, 
the federal Government, along with the 
Provinces and with the co-operation of 
management and labour, can do much to 
raise the level of working skills in this 
country. 

"In order to build our economy to a 
maximum degree we must have the highest 
possible degree of trained manpower." 

Mr. Starr then listed recent actions by 
the federal Government to encourage expan- 
sion of educational facilities: 

— ^The undertaking to pay 75 per cent 
of the provincial contribution for new voca- 
tional schools up to March 31, 1963; 50 
per cent of the cost of training teachers, 
instructors and administrative staffs; 50 per 
cent of the cost of training persons who 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

92006-6—4 



• FEBRUARY 796 7 



have left school; and 75 per cent of the 
cost of providing training for unemployed 
workers. 

— ^The provision of financial assistance to 
students attending institutes of technology. 

— ^The provision of grants for construc- 
tion of university residences. 

The technological age requires that a 
nation of 18 million people must have a 
greater proportion of highly trained man- 
power than countries with a larger labour 
force, he declared. 

Another recent government measure was 
the budgetary provision of double deprecia- 
tion for industries establishing in areas 
where unemployment is consistently high 
and for industries manufacturing new prod- 
ucts. "This should assist the establishment 
of new industries and the further provision 
of jobs," the Minister said. 

Another step was the establishment of 
the National Productivity Council, which 
will assist "the co-ordination of the iofv.fS 
of production and distribution." 

Here the Minister of Labour remarked 
that the achievement of the goal of high 
productivity would require the co-operation 
of management and labour. 

"Labour and management will have to 
learn to live with each other in order to 
maintain productivity levels that will enable 
industry to be competitive," he said. 

The recent budgetary measures that place 
emphasis on the growth of Canadian control 
and investment were designed to enable 
Canadian industry to compete on equal 
terms with industry owned outside the 
country. 

In world markets, Canada was in com- 
petition with countries that are aggressively 
engaged in increasing their economic output 
while wages and per capita incomes remain 
low compared with those in Canada. Cana- 
dian industry is trying to remain competitive 
by increasing productivity while at the same 
time maintaining high wage levels and a 
high standard of living. 

"This can only be accomplished by more 
efficient production methods and the use of 
technology," Mr. Starr said. "In a great 
many industries, the impact of increasing 
technology is having an effect on the means 
of livelihood of Canadians." 

Because the unskilled worker is the first 
to be affected is the reason we must have 
an expanded and accelerated nation-wide 

137 



program of training, and the reason for 
the programs for retraining the unemployed 
and the provision of more adequate unem- 
ployment insurance and coverage. 

"The responsibility falls upon industry 
and labour as well as Government to work 
out policies which will be national in scope, 
to deal with the tremendous effects of tech- 
nological change." 

His department, Mr. Starr said, had com- 
pleted a number of studies of the effects of 
such changes in various industries, and was 
now engaged on a study of technological 
change on the railways. 

The real root of the problem was the 
effect on human labour, the speaker said, 
and for this reason "the advent of automa- 
tion in Canada must be accompanied by 
consideration for the human factor." Those 
displaced must be re-trained for other em- 
ployment, and every effort must be made 
to minimize dislocation of the men and 
women in the factories. 

Among other measures that the Govern- 
ment had lately taken, or would soon take 
to encourage the development of the coun- 
try's economy, the Minister mentioned 
encouragement to the development of re- 
search in Canadian industry. 

Mr. Starr gave some figures on the results 
of two other government moves to increase 
employment, the legislation providing for 
loans to small business, and the Municipal 
Winter Works Incentive Program. 

Work amounting to some $75 million 
will be provided as a result of the estimated 
15,000 applications for, loans. In the muni- 
cipal winter works program, the federal 
Government had approved 5,119 projects 
so far, providing for work valued at an 
estimated $232 million on which some 
90,000 men will be given on-site employ- 
ment and an equal number of off-site 
employment. 

Leonard Hynes 

"Whether Canada can regain its former 
rate of growth and provide employment for 
all its people depends largely on whether 
we can compete successfully by increasing 
productivity and controlling costs so that 
our prices will be attractive to foreign and 
home consumers," said Leonard Hynes, 
who delivered the keynote address. 

For far too long, he said, we have been 
blaming others for our troubles but most 
of them are our own design: 

— ^We never learned to sell because "we 
didn't have to work very hard at it." 

— We didn't resist excessive and rapid 
wage demands unmatched by productivity 
because "we were greedy and short-sighted." 



"Our "made in Canada" problems can be 
overcome by "made in Canada" solutions, 
he suggested, and one solution we must seek 
is the means to increase our rate of growth 
so that we can absorb the recurring addi- 
tions to our labour force. Short-term solu- 
tions, based on subsidies and make-work 
projects, are costly palliatives, he warned. 

"To increase our rate of economic growth 
we must produce the kinds of goods and 
services that consumers at home and abroad 
want, at the prices they are willing to 
pay." 

Pointing out that the three most impor- 
tant factors in selling prices are labour 
costs, taxes and profits, Mr. Hynes said that 
in Canada, "one of the biggest roadblocks 
to growth is the burden of taxation. 

"Burdensome tax rates restrict business 
plans, discourage investment and minimize 
the incentives needed to stimulate enter- 
prise and to attract venture capital." He 
told the conference that taxes in 1959 
amounted to 33.2 per cent of national 
income, one third compared with one quar- 
ter in 1937. 

The basic tax structure is due for careful 
review, he said, and there are areas in 
which the tax structure should be flexible. 
A purposeful application of tax policy could 
do much to stimulate desirable develop- 
ments. 

The Chamber of Commerce brief to the 
Senate Special Committee on Manpower 
and Employment had some specific sugges- 
tions along these lines, he said, citing as 
examples the provision, through a com- 
bination of accelerated depreciation and tax 
reduction, of incentive to the manufacture 
of items that are now imported but could be 
produced in Canada; the use of accelerated 
depreciation applicable to the capital cost 
of wintertime construction; and tax bonus 
arrangements for Canadian companies un- 
dertaking research engineering and design. 

The need for increasing productivity was 
a recurring theme in the Chamber's brief 
to the Senate Committee, said Mr. Hynes. 
"To avoid being plowed under as other 
nations forge ahead, we must increase our 
productivity, collectively and individually. 

"Productivity is the key to higher living 
standards, to more real income, to greater 
security through having the means to look 
after our wants, and to national well-being." 

He compared the Canadian productivity 
record with that of competitor nations. 
From 1950 to 1957, productivity in Canada 
increased about 11 per cent, in the United 
States 17 per cent, in West Germany 44 per 
cent, and in Japan 130 per cent. 



138 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



"To increase productivity is, of course, 
a responsibility shared by all," he declared. 
"It calls for teamwork on the part of man- 
agement, government, capital and labour . . . 
All must be aware that added expense, 
unjustified by increased productivity, forces 
up costs and prices." 

In the past, productive efficiency, con- 
tinuing technological improvement and 
superior technology kept North American 
prices competitive in world markets. That 
superiority no longer exists, he warned. 
In Europe and Asia, modern factories with 
up-to-date equipment are producing goods 
equal in quality with those produced in 
North America, and foreign producers can 
make use of low-wage labour. 

"We may argue that as the standard of 
living rises in foreign countries, labour 
costs will also rise. But what shall we do 
about unemployment in the meantime?" he 
asked. 

"To achieve the required level of produc- 
tivity, teamwork on a national scale is 
essential," Mr. Hynes concluded. 

H. George De Young 

"To attempt to Canadianize European 
experience requires some rather far-reaching 
changes in Canadian thinking because 
European experience is the direct result of 
unity of purpose. If there is any recognized 
unified goal for all Canada, I cannot name 
it", said George De Young, who spoke on 
"Canadian Application of European Exper- 
ience." Mr. De Young was a member of 
the Canadian Trade Mission that visited 
Europe in October 1960 and spent three 
weeks studying the European Common 
Market. 

Summarizing the mission's findings, Mr. 
De Young said "first, the Common Market 
exists." It is "an operating trading com- 
munity organized primarily with inward- 
looking goals. Their ultimate goal is to 
have a politically unified country." The 
great difference is that compared with 
Canada they have a goal. 

Another goal of the six countries and 
the Common Market Commission is to 
improve the conditions of all people within 
the Common Market by maintaining a 
favourable balance of trade, by promoting 
free transfer of labour from one area to 
another to maintain full employment. They 
intend to attain self sufficiency in agricul- 
ture and manufacturing, by encouraging 
local production and trade, lowering pro- 
duction costs, and increasing output. 

"There is nothing in the goal of the 
Common Market which says anything about 
the prosperity of Canada. It is not their 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

92006-6— 4^ 



FEBRUARY 7967 



desire to increase trade with Canada unless 
that trade will assist them in reaching their 
goal." 

Each country is working as hard as it 
can to increase its industrial production, Mr. 
De Young reported. The governments hold 
out incentives for industry to ensure 
modernization, and make combinations so 
as to be competitive in world markets. 

Income tax for businesses is lower than 
in Canada. Because of flexible tax policies, 
manufacturers are able to quote low prices 
for anything to go into the export market. 
In Germany there is no tax on any com- 
modity manufactured for export. 

In Germany he saw steel mills tearing out 
equipment only 10 years old and replacing 
it with new modern equipment. "When you 
combine this with the encouragement of 
combines so as to develop large economic 
units, you may understand that even with- 
out state-wide organization we would find 
it difficult to compete against these mills," 
Mr. De Young said. 

He was impressed by the protection given 
to production within the Common Market 
area. For example, in The Netherlands, the 
government does not consider competition 
from Japan and Hong Kong and India to 
be normal competition, so it is excluded. 

The Common Market idea of free trade 
is: "How can we get into your market and 
keep you out of ours?" 

To apply the Common Market exper- 
ience to Canada, the first thing we need 
is unity, he said. Possibly the only way 
Canada will get the desire to achieve unity 
is through adversity. "Once the desire is 
here the rest follows naturally. 

"To make a start toward unity, our 
governmental leaders must set a goal to 
make all segments of our economy com- 
petitive in world markets and in the Cana- 
dian market," Mr. De Young said. 

"Our agricultural products and our min- 
ing products and our fish and our raw 
materials are going to be no more com- 
petitive in the markets of the world than 
our manufactured goods unless we unify 
to ensure that they are so. 

"We must accept the changes necessary 
to carry our load in the economic portion 
of this total war. We must create a Cana- 
dian organization composed of government, 
labour, management, agriculture, primary 
and secondary industry, raw material and 
forest production, and service industry, who 
together can show these other organized 
economies that Canadians can compete." 

This would be the Canadian application 
of European experience, he concluded. 



139 



Labour Legislation of the Past Decade— III 

Third of series of articles reviewing developments in labour legislation in 
Canada in 1951-60 period deals with anti-discrimination laws— fair employment, 
fair accommodation, equal pay— and with workmen's compensation legislation 



The Legislation Branch of the Department 
of Labour has prepared a review of develop- 
ments in labour legislation in Canada in the 
past decade, to supplement the article "Fifty 
Years of Labour Legislation" that appeared 
in the 50th Anniversary Issue of the Labour 
Gazette. The review is being published 
in instalments, of which this is the third. 

The first instalment, which appeared in 
the December 1960 issue, covered labour 



standards legislation. The second, in the 
January issue, concluded the review of labour 
standards legislation and dealt with laws 
concerning private employment agencies. 
This instalment deals with anti-discrimina- 
tion laws — fair employment practices, fair 
accommodation practices, and equal pay for 
equal work — and with workmen's compen- 
sation legislation. 



Part 3— Anti-Discrimination Laws 



A major development during the decade 
was the enactment of legislation designed to 
eliminate discriminatory practices in respect 
of employment and public accommodation, 
although two provinces, Ontario and Saskat- 
chewan, had passed anti-discrimination laws 
in the forties. 

In 1944, Ontario enacted the Racial 
Discrimination Act, making it an offence 
to display or publish any notice, sign, sym- 
bol or other representation expressing racial 
or religious discrimination. Saskatchewan 
passed a Bill of Rights Act in 1947 which 
asserted certain civil rights that were to be 
enjoyed by all persons without discrimina- 
tion because of race, creed, religion, colour, 
or ethnic or national origin. These included 
the right to obtain and retain employment, 
the right to own and occupy property, the 
right to membership in professional asso- 
ciations and occupational organizations and 
the right to education. No enforcement pro- 



cedures other than provision for a court 
action were set out in these early laws, 
and no administrative agency was established 
to secure compliance with their provisions. 

Between 1950 and 1960 Parliament and 
six provincial Legislatures passed Fair Em- 
ployment Practices Acts prohibiting discrim- 
ination in employment on grounds of race, 
colour, religion or national origin. Five 
provinces passed Fair Accommodation Prac- 
tices Acts, which provide that services or 
facilities in public places must be offered 
equally to all. New federal regulations were 
adopted in 1960 aimed at halting discrim- 
ination in the provision of accommodation 
under the National Housing Act. 

During the same period, also, Parliament 
and seven provinces enacted legislation 
designed to prevent economic discrimination 
against women workers solely on grounds 
of sex. 



Fair Employment Practices 



The movement for positive government 
action against discrimination in employ- 
ment began in 1951 when Ontario enacted 
the Fair Employment Practices Act, which 
provided that race, creed, colour, nationality, 
ancestry or place of origin must not be 
determining factors in the hiring, firing, 
promotion or conditions of work of em- 
ployees or in admission to trade unions. 
With certain differences in the interpretation 
given to the terms national origin and 
religion, all the Acts contain the same basic 
provision. 

The federal Government was next in the 
field, passing the Canada Fair Employment 
Practices Act in 1953, which forbade dis- 
crimination in employment within the legis- 
lative jurisdiction of the Parliament of 
Canada. 



Two other federal anti-discrimination 
measures were introduced about the same 
time. One was a 1952 amendment to the 
Unemployment Insurance Act which re- 
quired the Unemployment Insurance Com- 
mission to ensure that there was no discrim- 
ination by the National Employment Service 
on grounds of racial origin, colour, religious 
belief or political affiliation in referring 
workers to jobs. In effect, this incorporated 
into law a policy previously followed by the 
National Employment Service. The other 
measure was an Order in Council, effective 
January 1, 1953, that required a non- 
discrimination clause to be inserted in all 
federal government construction and sup- 
plies contracts. The clause requires the 
contractor to refrain from discriminatory 
employment practices based on race, national 
origin, colour or religion. 



140 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



The second province to adopt this type 
of anti-discrimination law was Manitoba, 
which passed a Fair Employment Practices 
Act in 1953. Similar legislation was enacted 
in Nova Scotia in 1955 and in British 
Columbia and New Brunswick in 1956. In 
the same year (1956), Saskatchewan re- 
pealed the fair employment practices pro- 
visions of its Bill of Rights Act and replaced 
them by a separate statute, the Fair Em- 
ployment Practices Act, which contained 
provisions for investigating and settling com- 
plaints and for enforcement similar to those 
in the other fair employment practices laws. 

Under all the Acts, an employer may not 
refuse to employ or discharge any person 
or otherwise discriminate against any per- 
son in regard to employment or any term 
or condition of employment because of his 
race, colour, religion or national origin. He 
is also forbidden to publish advertisements, 
to circulate application forms and, except 
in Manitoba, to make oral or written in- 
quiries in connection with employment 
which indicate discrimination. 

In 1959 Saskatchewan amended its Act 
to prohibit not only any direct or indirect 
expression of discrimination but also any 
expression of intent to discriminate. The 
inclusion in an application form, advertise- 
ment or inquiry of any question or request 
for particulars as to an applicant's race, 
colour, religion or national origin was also 
forbidden. 

Except in Nova Scotia and Ontario, an 
exception is permitted, however, where a 
preference as to race, colour, religion or 
national origin is based upon a bona fide 
occupational qualification, that is, a qualifi- 
cation actually and legitimately required 
because of the nature of the work. 

These prohibitions apply to employment 
agencies as well as to employers. In addi- 
tion, the federal Act and the Acts of 
Manitoba, Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan 
expressly forbid an employer to use an 
employment agency which practices discrim- 
ination. 

The Acts also forbid discriminatory action 
by trade unions. No union may exclude 
anyone from membership, or expel, suspend 
or otherwise discriminate against any of its 
members because of race, colour, religion or 
national origin. 

Some exceptions are provided for in 
all the provincial Acts. These are: employers 
with fewer than five employees (excluded 
in all Acts except those of Nova Scotia and 
Saskatchewan), domestic servants in private 
homes (excluded except in Nova Scotia) 
and non-profit organizations (excluded 
under all the Acts). As enacted, the Nova 
Scotia Act exempted employers with fewer 
than five employees but, by an amendment 



in 1959, coverage was extended to all 
employers, regardless of the number of 
their employees. An employer of fewer than 
five persons is also excluded from the federal 
Act. 

Two of the Acts provide exceptions to 
the general rule that educational institutions 
(like other non-profit organizations) are 
excluded. The British Columbia Act applies 
to schools operating under the Public 
Schools Act. In Saskatchewan, educational 
institutions are covered but the right of a 
school or board of trustees to hire persons 
of a particular religion where religious 
instruction forms part of the curriculum is 
recognized. The Manitoba, New Brunswick 
and Saskatchewan Acts are binding on the 
Crown (including, in Manitoba, Crown 
companies). The federal Act also applies 
to Crown corporations. 

Enforcement procedures are initiated by 
the filing of a written complaint by an 
aggrieved individual (in New Brunswick, 
with the Minister of Labour; in the other 
jurisdictions, with the Director, an officer 
of the Department charged with the duty 
of dealing with complaints). 

If the complaint is considered a valid one, 
an attempt at settlement is made through a 
departmental inquiry. Failing settlement 
through this means, the Minister is em- 
powered to set up a commission of one or 
more persons to ascertain the facts and 
make recommendations as to how the matter 
can best be settled. The commissions are of 
the ad hoc type except in British Columbia, 
where the Board of Industrial Relations acts 
as a commission of inquiry. In practice, 
most complaints are settled at the first 
stage. 

The board or commission, as the case 
may be, has full authority to summon wit- 
nesses, order the production of documents 
and enter workplaces, and must give the 
parties an opportunity to be heard. 

Under all the Acts but those of British 
Columbia and Ontario, the Minister is 
required to give each of the parties a copy 
of the recommendations and may publish 
them if he thinks it advisable. 

The Minister may issue whatever order is 
necessary to carry out the commission's 
recommendations, which may include re- 
instatement, with or without compensation 
for loss of employment. This order is final 
and binding on the parties except in Mani- 
toba, where a person affected by an order 
has 10 days in which to appeal to a judge 
of the Court of Queen's Bench. 

As a last resort, in case of non-com- 
pliance, there is provision for prosecution 
in the courts, for which the consent of the 
Minister is necessary. Failure to comply 
with an order is made an offence punishable 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196? 



141 



by a fine (in most of the Acts, up to $100 
for an individual and $500 for a corporation 
or trade union). Under some of the Acts, 
a court may order an employer who has 
been convicted of a violation of the Act 
to reinstate an employee and pay him 
compensation for loss of visages. 

Most of the Acts protect an individual 
who lodges a complaint or assists in the 
making of a complaint against discrimina- 
tion or discharge by the employer. 

Further, under most of the Acts, the right 
of an aggrieved individual to take action 
in court under any other provisions of the 
Act is not abridged. The Manitoba Act 
stipulates, however, that a person who 
initiates court proceedings may not make 
a complaint and vice versa. 

In view of the fact that legislation by 
itself cannot change the attitudes of mind 
that are at the root of discrimination, some 
of the Acts made provision for the carrying 
on of educational programs to promote a 



public lawareness of the law. The federal Act 
and the Manitoba, Nova Scotia and Saskat- 
chewan Acts authorize the Minister to under- 
take inquiries and other measures to pro- 
mote the purposes of the Act, Under this 
authority the federal Department of Labour 
has sponsored radio talks and radio and 
television plays. It has also distribuited 
pamphlets and posters and sponsored films 
showing the harmful effects of discrimina- 
tion in employment. 

In Ontario, a three-member Anti-Discrim- 
ination Commission was set up in 1959 to 
carry on a program of education to promote 
the elimination of discriminatory practices. 
Through its efforts, pamphlets and posters 
have been widely distributed. As part of 
the drive to eradicate prejudice against 
particular groups on account of race, lan- 
guage or religion, December 4 to 11, 1960, 
was proclaimed Human Rights Week for 
observance in the secondary schools of 
Ontario. 



Fair Accommodation Practices 



Ontario passed the first Fair Accommoda- 
tion Practices Act in 1954. The preamble 
to this Act read: 

Whereas it is public policy in Ontario that 
places to which the public is customarily 
admitted be open to all without regard to 
race, creed, colour, nationality, ancestry or 
place of origin; whereas it is desirable to enact 
a measure to promote observance of this prin- 
ciple; and whereas to do so is in accord with 
the Universal Declaration of Human Rights 
as proclaimed by the United Nations . . . 

Saskatchewan passed a Fair Accommoda- 
tion Practices Act in 1956 and substantially 
similar legislation was enacted in New 
Brunswick and Nova Scotia in 1959 and 
in Manitoba in 1960. 

All the Acts provide that the facilities, 
accommodation and services of places that 
are customarily open to the public — hotels, 
restaurants, barber shops, theatres, etc. — 
must not be denied to anyone because of his 
race, creed, colour, nationality, ancestry or 
place of origin. They also prohibit indica- 
tions by signs, symbols, or advertisements 
in the newspapers, on the radio or by means 
of any other medium of communication that 
admission to any public establishment is 
restricted for racial or religious reasons. In 
Saskatchewan and Manitoba, these prohibi- 
tions apply to the Crown as well as to 
the general public. Places of worship are 
exempted in Manitoba. 

In all five provinces action is initiated 
by the filling of a written complaint (usually 
with the Department of Labour) by the 
individual alleging discrimination. Com- 
plaints are dealt with in the same manner 
as complaints under the Fair Employment 



Practices Acts, i.e., by investigation and 
conciliation and, if necessary, through a 
commission of inquiry. 

In Manitoba, New Brunswick and On- 
tario, recommendations of a commission of 
inquiry may be implemented by an order 
of the Minister, which is binding on the 
persons affected. In Manitoba, the Minister 
must furnish the interested parties with a 
copy of the recommendations. 

The Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan Acts 
rely on publicity to secure compliance. In 
these provinces the Minister responsible for 
the administration of the Act is not author- 
ized to issue a binding order. He is required, 
however, to issue a copy of the commission's 
recommendations to each of the persons 
concerned, and he may order publication 
of the commission's findings, if he sees fit. 
Where these measures do not secure com- 
pliance, the complainant must seek redress 
through court action, for which the written 
consent of the Minister is required. 

A person found guilty of a violation of 
the Act is subject to a maximum fine of 
$50 ($100 for a corporation). In Manitoba, 
Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan, higher 
penalties become applicable after a first 
offence. 

The relevant Saskatchewan provisions 
state that a prosecution may be brought 
upon the information of any person alleging 
that there has been discrimination, and, 
where it is established that a person's right 
to accommodation has been denied or 
restricted, the onus is on the accused to 
prove that the restriction was not because 
of race, religion, colour or national origin. 



142 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



Under all the Acts, the Minister may 
apply to the courts for an order enjoining 
a person who has been convicted of an 
offence from continuing the violation. In 
Manitoba, New Brunswick and Ontario, an 
injunction may be applied for, however, only 
with respect to a person who has been found 
guilty of displaying discriminatory signs or 
publishing discriminatory advertising. 

In 1960, the federal Government, with 
a view to preventing discrimination in the 
provision of housing accommodation under 
the National Housing Act, amended the 
national housing loan regulations. The 
amendments make it a condition of every 
loan made by an approved lender and 



insured by Central Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation that the borrower will not 
discriminate against any person by reason of 
his race, colour, religion or origin. They also 
provide for a review by an independent arbi- 
trator of any allegations of discrimination. 
Any merchant, builder or rental entre- 
preneur found guilty of practising discrim- 
ination on grounds of race, colour, religion 
or national origin will be debarred from 
obtaining further loans under the Act for 
a period of three years. To ensure that this 
penalty is made known to all National 
Housing Act borrowers, a clause to this 
effect will be inserted in every National 
Housing Act mortgage. 



Equal Pay 



The principle of equal pay for equal work 
was first embodied in a law in Canada in 
1951 when Ontario passed the Female 
Employees Fair Remuneration Act, effective 
from lanuary 1, 1952. In 1952 Saskat- 
chewan enacted an Equal Pay Act, followed 
by British Columbia in 1953. The federal 
Act (applicable to federal works, under- 
takings or businesses) was passed in 1956, 
as were the Acts of Manitoba and Nova 
Scotia. The Alberta Legislature approved 
equal pay provisions in 1957, and in 1959 
Prince Edward Island became the seventh 
province to adopt such legislation. 

Although there is some variation as to 
details, all the Acts have the same basic 
purpose — to prevent discrimination in rates 
of pay solely on the basis of sex. The 
British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and 
Prince Edward Island Acts prohibit an em- 
ployer from paying a female employee at a 
rate of pay less than the rate paid to a 
male employee "for the same work done in 
the same establishment." The Saskatchewan 
Act requires women to be paid at the same 
rate as men for "work of comparable 
character done in the same establishment." 
In Manitoba, the terms used are "identical 
or substantially identical work." The Mani- 
toba Act also differs from the others in 
that it forbids discrimination against either 
sex in the payment of wage rates. It pro- 
hibits an employer from paying to the 
employees of one sex wages on a scale 
different from that on which wages are 
paid to employees of the other sex in the 
same establishment. Both the federal Act 
and the Alberta Act require women to be 
paid at the same rate as men for identical 
or substantially identical work. In all cases 
a difference in rates of pay based on any 
factor other than sex does not constitute a 
failure to comply with the legislation. 

The provincial equal pay laws cover 
practically all types of employment. Em- 



ployers of domestic servants and farm 
labourers are excluded in Alberta. In Mani- 
toba and Saskatchewan, the provincial Gov- 
ernment is considered as an employer under 
the Act. 

The federal Act applies to Crown com- 
panies. It does not cover classified civil 
servants, however, since they are under 
the jurisdiction of the Civil Service Com- 
mission, which sets rates of pay according 
to classifications based on job content, 
irrespective of whether the work is to be 
done by men or women. 

Provisions for enforcement are similar 
to those contained in the fair employment 
practices Acts, with the same emphasis on 
informal methods of investigation, concilia- 
tion and persuasion. Like the fair employ- 
ment practices and fair accommodation 
practices laws, equal pay laws are enforced 
only through complaint. 

An aggrieved employee must file a written 
complaint with the Director (under the 
federal Act, with the Minister of Labour; in 
Alberta, wtih the Chairman of the Board of 
Industrial Relations; and in Prince Edward 
Island, with the Labour Relations Board). 

In all jurisdictions except Prince Edward 
Island, a two-stage enforcement procedure 
is provided for: first, investigation by an 
officer of the Department of Labour, and 
second, a more formal inquiry by a board, 
commission or referee. In Alberta and 
British Columbia, if the officer is unsuccess- 
ful in effecting a settlement, the complaint 
may be referred to the Board of Industrial 
Relations. Under the federal and Manitoba 
Acts, the second stage is the appointment 
of a referee, who may or may not be an 
officer of the Department of Labour, to 
conduct an inquiry and make recommenda- 
tions. All the Acts stipulate that the parties 
must be given full opportunity to be heard. 

The recommendations of the board, com- 
mission or referees, as the case may be, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196 J 



143 



may be put into effect by an order of the 
Minister, except under the federal and 
Alberta Acts, where the referee and the 
Board of Industrial Relations, respectively, 
may issue an order. Compliance with the 
order is required in all cases. 

In Prince Edward Island, the Labour 
Relations Board is authorized to "inquire 
into the complaint and endeavour to effect 
a settlement of the matters complained of." 
There is no provision in the Act for a 
Board order, with which compliance is 
required. 

One province, Manitoba, imposes a time- 
limit for the filing of complaints. An em- 
ployee who fails to lodge a complaint within 
30 days after receiving his or her first wages 
at an unlawful scale is barred from making 
a complaint and having it dealt with under 
the Act. 

While the purpose of the Acts is to 
ensure fair remuneration through settlement 
by conciliation rather than by prosecution, 



they all nevertheless provide penalties for 
employers who are convicted of failing to 
comply with the Act or an order. The fine 
that may be imposed varies from one 
jurisdiction to another, but is usually a 
maximum of $100. Some of the Acts pro- 
vide that, in addition to imposing a fine, a 
court may order an employer to reimburse 
an employee for the wages (subject to 
certain limits) she lost as a result of his 
failure to comply with the Act. 

Under all but three of the Acts, a person 
who lays a complaint is protected against 
discrimination or discharge by the employer. 
Most of the Acts provide also that an 
aggrieved person may institute court pro- 
ceedings against an employer, but stipulate 
that an employer may not be penalized 
twice for the same offence. 

Under the federal and Nova Scotia laws, 
the Minister is authorized to undertake 
"inquiries and other measures" to promote 
the purposes of the Act. 



Part 4— Workmen's Compensation 



The main developments in workmen's 
compensation legislation in the past decade 
were a continued upward revision of bene- 
fits, a reduction of the waiting period and 
a general extension of coverage. Although 
amendments to the Acts were frequent, the 
changes did not affect the principles on 
which the legislation is based. Basically, the 
system of workmen's compensation inaugur- 
ated in 1914 with the enactment of the 
Ontario Act remains unchanged. 

Between 1952 and 1959 eight provinces 
raised from 66f to 75 the percentage rate 
of earnings on which disability benefits are 
based. In some provinces the rate was raised 
in two stages, first to 70 per cent and later 
to 75. In all provinces disability pensions 
are now based on 75 per cent of average 
earnings, Saskatchewan and Ontario having 
adopted a 75-per-cent rate before 1950. 

In the calculation of disability pensions, 
any excess of annual earnings above the 
ceiling provided in the Act is disregarded. 
The maximum annual earnings on which 
compensation may be paid, which in 1950 
were either $2,500 or $3,000 in all provinces, 
were increased two or three times during 
the decade in all jurisdictions except New- 
foundland, where the original $3,000 maxi- 
mum adopted in 1951 remains in effect. The 
highest ceiling on annual earnings is now 
$6,000, the maximum set by the Saskat- 
chewan Legislature in 1960. 

The minimum compensation payment that 
may be made to a disabled workman was 
also increased in the ten-year period in 
most provinces and now ranges from $15 to 
$30 a week. One of the new features of 



the Nova Scotia Act, as amended in 1960, 
is that it set a new minimum award for a 
permanently and totally disabled workman 
with dependent children equal to the amount 
payable to a widow with the same number 
of children under 16 years of age. For a 
permanently and totally disabled workman 
without at least two children under 16 years 
the minimum compensation award is, as 
before, $100 a month. In making this 
amendment, the Legislature provided that 
the costs of paying compensation at the 
higher rate were to be paid from the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund. 

In another 1960 amendment, the Nova 
Scotia Legislature increased permanent par- 
tial disability pensions in respect of acci- 
dents that occurred before April 1, 1959, 
providing that all pensions being paid on 
the basis of 66f or 70 per cent of average 
earnings were to be re-calculated and paid 
on the basis of 75 per cent of earnings, the 
additional costs to be borne by the Con- 
solidated Revenue Fund. A 75-per-cent 
compensation rate was adopted in 1959 but 
was made applicable only in respect of 
accidents occurring on or after April 1, 
1959. This amendment made the 75-per-cent 
rate applicable in all permanent partial 
disability cases. Disability pensions in respect 
of past accidents were increased in only one 
or two instances previously. In 1954 the 
British Columbia Legislature increased all 
permanent disability awards, both total and 
partial, made before March 18, 1943. 

In Saskatchewan, provision was made in 
1953 for the payment of compensation to 
a workman for a recurring disability on the 



144 



THB LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



basis of his current earnings if they were 
higher than his earnings at the time of the 
original injury. 

As a result of frequent amendments, 
benefits to dependants in fatal cases were 
substantially increased in all provinces. 
Widows' pensions, which ranged from $40 
to $50 a month in 1950, now range from 
$50 in Prince Edward Island to $100 in 
Saskatchewan. In Saskatchewan, the pension 
of $100 a month provided for in 1960 is 
payable only to the age of 70, however. 
After the age of 70, when the recipient 
becomes eligible for old age security pay- 
ments, the pension becomes $75 a month. 
As a precedent for such action, the Alberta 
Legislature in 1952 and again in 1956 
granted an increase in the benefit to widows 
or invalid widowers who were in receipt of 
compensation at an earlier scale of benefits 
until such time as the recipient became 
eligible for assistance under social legisla- 
tion. 

The immediate lump sum payment made 
to a widow to help meet the special expenses 
arising from the death of her husband was 
correspondingly increased. Only two prov- 
inces now retain the $100 lump sum that 
was everywhere provided in 1950. In four 
provinces the amount paid is now $300. 

In Alberta (1952), Manitoba (1953), 
New Brunswick (1958) and Ontario (1960 ). 
all widows' pensions being paid according 
to a lower scale of benefits were brought 
up to the current level but no increase was 
provided in the current rate. Children's 
allowances were also raised to the current 
scale of benefits in Manitoba (1955), New 
Brunswick (1957) and Ontario (1960). In 
most provinces, increases in benefits are 
made applicable to all existing pensioners, 
with the additional costs in some instances 
(New Brunswick in 1958 and 1960 and 
Nova Scotia in 1959) being paid from the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund. 

In Nova Scotia, the ceiling on the monthly 
allowance payable to a widow and children, 
which was raised in 1956 to permit payment 
for five rather than four children, was 
removed in 1960, enabling the Board to 
pay benefits in respect of all children in a 
family under 16 years, regardless of their 
number. Prince Edward Island is the only 
province which places a limit (six) on the 
number of children for whom an allowance 
is payable. 

Children's benefits were doubled in the 
ten-year period. Ranging from $10 to $15 a 
month in 1950, they now vary from $20 to 
$35. Higher pensions, varying from $30 to 
$50 a month, are provided for orphan 
children. The amounts paid in 1950 ranged 
from $15 to $25 a month. 



A new provision in Saskatchewan in 1959 
gave the Workmen's Compensation Board 
discretionary power to pay a lump sum 
of not more than $50 to each orphan child. 
A further amendment in the same year 
authorized payment of compensation for 
educational purposes, at the discretion of 
the Board, until a child reaches the age of 
19. Neither of these provisions appears in 
any other provincial Act. In the other 
provinces no compensation may be paid in 
respect of a child, other than an invalid 
child, beyond the age of 18. 

A new and separate allowance, not ex- 
ceeding $75 a month, for a wholly dependent 
mother of a deceased workman was intro- 
duced in Manitoba in 1960. All persons 
in this category in receipt of benefits when 
the amending Act went into force were 
made eligible for the new allowance. Pre- 
viously, a dependent mother was classed 
with other dependants for whom the Board 
is authorized to make a suitable award in 
proportion to the pecuniary loss sustained 
because of the death of the workman. 

Payment of benefits to a common law 
wife under specified conditions and at the 
discretion of the Board was authorized in 
Alberta and Manitoba during the decade. 
In Saskatchewan and Alberta, the duration 
of a common law relationship necessary to 
qualify for benefits under the Act was 
reduced. In British Columbia, in 1959 a 
common law wife in receipt of compensation 
was made eligible for the same benefits as 
a widow on remarriage. 

Allowances for funeral expenses, which 
in 1950 varied between $100 and $175 were 
everywhere increased from time to time, 
and now range from $200 to $400, the 
latter amount being the allowance payable 
in Quebec. During the period, too, the 
Boards in five provinces were empowered 
to pay a further sum where it was necessary 
for a workman's body to be transported 
from the place of death to the place of 
burial. All provinces now provide for such 
an allowance. The Manitoba and Saskat- 
chewan Acts made provision for a grant 
of up to $50 for the purchase of a burial 
plot. This provision has no equivalent in 
the other Acts. 

In 1950 a waiting period of seven days 
was common, and in one province it was 
necessary for a workman to be disabled for 
14 days in order to be paid compensation 
for the first three days of his disability. 

Between 1950 and 1960 a shorter waiting 
period was provided for in all provinces 
except New Brunswick. In New Brunswick, 
the waiting period was reduced, from seven 
to four days, in 1948. In three provinces 
the waiting period was shortened to one 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



14S 



1. pi 



day: Saskatchewan (1950), Alberta (1952) 
and Manitoba (1959). In the remaining 
provinces the waiting period is now three, 
four or five days. 

r— The coverage of the Acts, originally 
comprehensive, has been broadened from 
time to time in all provinces. Originally 
designed to apply to industrial employment, 
the Acts now cover commercial establish- 
ments as well. Retail stores, hospitals, nurs- 
ing homes, hotels, restaurants and radio 
stations have been brought within the scope 
of the Acts in recent years. Shops, hotels 
and restaurants are now covered in all 
provinces except Quebec; hospitals are 
covered in all provinces except Prince 
Edward Island and Qudbec. 

In all provinces there is provision for 
elective coverage of most non-covered em- 
ployment on the application of the em- 
ployer. Provision was made in British 
Columbia in 1954 for elective coverage of 
domestic servants and "independent opera- 
tors," the latter term being chiefly designed 
to cover commercial fishermen. 

New or increased expenditures for rehab- 
ilitation and training were authorized in five 
provinces. The most recent increase was 
in Quebec, where the amount authorized 
was raised from $100,000 to $300,000 in 
1960. In British Columbia in 1952, and 
in Nova Scotia in 1959, former limits on 
annual expenditures were removed, leaving 
the amount that might be spent to the 
discretion of the Board. 

Since the Boards have full authority to 
furnish injured workmen with whatever 
medical care is deemed necessary to pro- 
mote prompt and complete recovery, amend- 
ments in connection with medical aid were 
of detail rather than of principle. Several 
Acts were amended to provide for treatment 
by registered osteopaths, chiropractors, etc., 
subject, as with all medical aid, to the 
supervisory control of the Board. 

In a number of provinces — British Colum- 
bia, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and Mani- 
toba — a medical appeal procedure was 
established, enabling an injured workman 
dissatisfied with the disposition of his claim 
on medical grounds to be re-examined by 
one or more specialists and to have his 
claim reviewed. In Alberta and British 
Columbia, changes were made in the original 
appeal procedure provided. In British 
Columbia, as a result of a 1959 amendment, 
a case in which a workman feels aggrieved 
at a decision of the Board may be reviewed 
by a three-member Medical Review Panel, 
whose decisions are binding on the Board. 
A review may be requested by either the 
workman or his employer. One member 
of the panel is selected by the workman 

146 



and one by his employer from a list of 
specialists prepared by a medical committee 
appointed by Order in Council. A Chair- 
man of Medical Review Panels, appointed 
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, 
serves on each panel as Chairman. 

In a 1960 amendment the Newfoundland 
Board was given authority, subject to the 
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in 
Council, to appoint a committee of medical 
referees to investigate, in relation to any 
claim for compensation, the nature of a 
disease named in the schedule of indus- 
trial diseases, and its relationship to any 
of the work processes listed opposite the 
disease in the schedule. The committee's 
decision is to be final and binding on the 
Board and the claimant as to the medical 
findings in the case. 

Greater administrative discretion was 
given to the Boards through the adoption of 
a broader definition of "accident" in Alberta, 
British Columbia and Manitoba, making it 
possible to allow a claim for any disable- 
ment, including an industrial disease, that 
can be shown to have arisen by reason 
of the nature of the employment. In some 
provinces compensation may be granted for 
a disease not listed in a schedule, either 
by reason of the wider definition of "acci- 
dent" or through the power given to the 
Board to award compensation for any dis- 
ease shown to be peculiar to or characteristic 
of a particular industrial process, trade or 
occupation. A number of new diseases were 
added to the schedule in most provinces in 
the ten-year period. As an example, dis- 
eases due to radiation were made com- 
pensable in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia 
in 1960. In several provinces limitations 
previously imposed on payment of compen- 
sation for silicosis were removed or relaxed. 

In Manitoba, British Columbia and Nova 
Scotia, a Compensation Counsellor was 
named to assist injured workmen with com- 
pensation problems. 

In three additional provinces — Manitoba, 
Newfoundland and Nova Scotia — the Board 
was empowered to establish a Second Injury 
Fund. The purpose of such funds is to 
relieve employers in a class of the total cost 
of a second accident occurring to a work- 
man who had suffered a disability in pre- 
vious employment. 

During the period the two federal com- 
pensation laws were also amended. 

The Merchant Seamen Compensation Act, 
which applies to seamen who are not within 
the scope of a provincial workmen's com- 
pensation law, was amended in 1953 and 
again in 1957 for the purpose of bringing 
benefits into line with those payable under 

(^Continued on page 168) 
THB LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



Older Workers 



White House Conference on Aging 

That arbitrary upper age limits in hiring cannot be justified and should be 
abandoned was one of conclusions emerging from conference, first of Its kind 



"Arbitrary age limits in hiring cannot be 
justified and should be abandoned." This 
was one of the conclusions that emerged 
from the White House Conference on 
Aging, held in Washington last month. 

Some 2,700 delegates attended from all 
States of the Union. In addition, some 
guests were invited from other countries; 
18 attended from Canada. 

The conference, authorized by special 
legislation passed by the U.S. Congress in 
1958, was the first of its kind devoted 
to problems of the aged. The many problems 
explored included: employment security, 
income maintenance, health and medical 
care, rehabilitation, social services, housing, 
education and recreation. 

One section devoted its discussions to 
employment security and retirement. The 
participants agreed that the ever-increasing 
tempo of industrial advance and the rapidly 
growing complexity of technological innova- 
tions have produced a labour market in 
which many older workers find themselves 
without any secure attachment to a job 
or actually displaced and unable to find 
employment. 

This section believed it was "desirable 
that private pension plans contain 'vesting' 
provisions to assure the worker who changes 
jobs of some retirement benefits. Where 
financially feasible, employee rights under 
some existing plans should be liberalized." 
A substantial minority, however, thought 
this was a matter for the independent judg- 
ment of employers and employees. 

It was agreed that, although there are 
significant individual variations in all age 
groups, extensive studies revealed no sound 
basis for the widespread belief that older 
workers as an age group are less productive, 
less reliable and more prone to accidents 
and absenteeism than younger workers. 
Management and organized labour were 
urged to co-operate in reviewing the ob- 
stacles that exist, and develop programs to 
minimize the dislocation of older workers 
on the job. 

From the Conference emerged a declara- 
tion of rights and obligations, a "Senior 
Citizens' Charter," as follows: 

Rights of Senior Citizens: 

Each of our senior citizens, regardless of 
race, color or creed is entitled to: 

1. The right to be useful. 

2. The right to obtain employment, based 
on merit. 



3. The right to freedom from want in old 
age. 

4. The right to a fair share of the com- 
munity's recreational, educational, and medical 
resources. 

5. The right to obtain decent housing suited 
to needs of later years. 

6. The right to the moral and financial 
support of one's family so far as is consistent 
with the best interest of the family. 

7. The right to live independently as one 
chooses. 

8. The right to live and to die with dignity. 

9. The right of access to all knowledge as 
available on how to improve the later years 
of fife. 

Obligations of the Aging: 

The aging, by availing themselves of educa- 
tional opportunities, should endeavour to 
assume the following obligations to the best 
of their ability: 

1. The obligation of each citizen to pre- 
pare himself to become and resolve to remain 
active, alert, capable, self-supporting and useful 
so long as health and circumstances permit 
and to plan ultimate retirement. 

2. The obligation to learn and apply sound 
principles of physical and mental health. 

3. The obligation to seek and develop 
potential avenues of service in the years after 
retirement. 

4. The obligation to make available the bene- 
fits of his experience and knowledge. 

5. The obligation to endeavor to make him- 
self adaptable to the changes added years 
will bring. 

6. The obligation to attempt to maintain 
such relationships with family, neighbours and 
friends as will make him a respected and 
valued counsellor throughout the later years. 

Canada was represented by: Mrs. Jean 
Good, Toronto, and Miss Marie Hamel, 
Ottawa, Canadian Welfare Council; Miss 
Hope Holmsted, Toronto, Canadian Red 
Cross; Dr. Ian MacDonald, Canadian Medi- 
cal Association; Andre Landry, Rev. Father 
Riendeau and Dr. F. Laurendeau, Province 
of Quebec; H. S. Farquhar, Province of 
Nova Scotia; Prof. James Clare, Province of 
Manitoba; Miss Lola Wilson, Province of 
Saskatchewan; Kenneth L. Hawkins and 
Donald Bellamy, Province of Ontario; 
Humphrey Carver, Central Mortgage and 
Housing Corporation; Dr. E. A. Watkinson 
and Mrs. Flora E. Hurst, Department of 
National Health and Welfare; Dr. John N. 
Crawford, Department of Veterans Affairs; 
Ian Campbell, Civilian Rehabilitation 
Branch, Department of Labour; and Pat 
Conroy, Canadian Labour Counsellor, 
Washington. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196 1 



147 



Women's Bureau 



Vocational Training for Girls 



ICFTU Executive Board enunciates principles held to be essential in adequate 
program of vocational training and guidance of girls and women. Ontario Hydro 
Employees Union conducts special basic training courses for 18 women stewards 



A resolution on vocational training and 
guidance for girls and women that was 
passed recently by the Executive Board of 
the International Confederation of Free 
Trade Unions enunciated the principles held 
to be essential in an adequate program in 
this area. They were: 

1. The terms and conditions of access to 
vocational training should be equal for both 
sexes and generally for the same trades and 
occupations, including scientific and tech- 
nical professions. 

2. Proper care should be taken to give 
equal opportunities to young persons of both 
sexes to participate in apprenticeship and 
training programs. 

3. All efforts should be made to give to 
girls the same opportunities for schooling 
as are given to boys; and to ensure that 
they have at their disposal during and after 
their last years at school the same vocational 
guidance facilities. 

4. Vocational training and guidance 
should be adjusted to the needs of a tech- 
nologically progressing economy. 

5. Vocational guidance services should 
take account not only of individual aptitudes 
but also of available employment oppor- 
tunities. 

6. Publicity and information campaigns 
about the vocational guidance services and 
employment opportunities should be carried 
out among girls, parents, teachers, em- 
ployers and trade unions. 

7. Special arrangements should be made 
for the vocational readjustment of women 
who resume employment after an interrup- 
tion lasting several years. 

8. Special attention should be given to 
all these problems in the developing coun- 
tries, where the needs are particularly 
urgent. 

The Executive Board also called upon the 
United Nations and its specialized agencies 
to assist vocational training programs for 
women and girls, particularly in the 
economically developing countries. 

Basic Training for Women Stewards 

Eighteen women stewards from nine divi- 
sions were recently given a special basic 
training course by the Ontario Hydro Em- 
ployees Union. 

In addition to their general responsibilities 
as stewards, the group discussed the role 



of women in building the trade union move- 
ment. Three women, active in the trade 
union movement, led discussions on "How 
can unions help working women?" and 
"How can more women in the OHEU be 
persuaded to take an interest in union 
activities?" 

A "trial grievance" involving the relief 
pay of a woman clerk was acted out through 
its various stages and discussed. 

The women also studied the constitution 
of their union, and union finances, the col- 
lective bargaining and certification proce- 
dure, and the main provisions of the OHEU 
collective agreement. 

U.N. Commission on Status of Women 

The 1961 session of the United Nations 
Commission on the Status of Women will 
be convened at the U.N. European Office in 
Geneva on March 13. During the past three 
years Canada served on the 18-member 
Commission but this year is replaced by 
Australia. 

The agenda of the Commission will fol- 
low its usual pattern. The principal subjects 
to be considered during the three weeks 
of discussion will be: developments in the 
political rights of women; economic rights, 
and phases of the occupational outlook for 
women; the status of women in private law, 
this year having to do especially with the 
minimum age of marriage, consent of the 
parties to the marriage and registration of 
marriages; and the access of women to 
education with special emphasis on the 
position of women in the teaching profes- 
sion. 

New Director of U.S. Women's Bureau 

The appointment of Mrs. Esther Peter- 
son as one of the assistants to the U.S. 
Secretary of Labor and Director of the 
Women's Bureau was announced last month. 

For 15 years she worked for the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, 
first as assistant director of education, and 
later as the union's Washington legislative 
representative. She has served as a member 
of the Department of Labor's Advisory 
Committee of the Women's Bureau and of 
the Minimum Wage Board for the District 
of Columbia. During the past three years 
she has been legislative representative of 
the Industrial Union Department, of the 
AFL-CIO. 



148 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



from the Labour Gazette, February 1911 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Amendments to Quebec Factories' Act effective January 1, 1911 reduced liours of 
work for women and children in cotton and woollen factories from 60 to 58 a 
week. Vancouver printers gain seven-hour day by end of three-year agreement 



A number of changes in wages, hours, 
and conditions of employment were reported 
in the February 1911 number of the Labour 
Gazette. 

Amendments to the Factories' Act of the 
province of Quebec that went into effect on 
January 1 reduced the hours of work for 
women and children in cotton and woollen 
factories from 60 to 58 a week. "In certain 
instances," the Gazette said, the employers 
made no reduction in the weekly earnings 
of the employees affected. 

The Quebec Government announced that 
it would open free employment bureaus in 
Montreal and Quebec, and that other offices 
would be opened later as circumstances 
might require. 

The Gazette's Ottawa correspondent re- 
ported: "The mayor and chief of the fire 
brigade have recommended a change in 
firemen's hours of duty, giving a man every 
eighth day for rest. The present schedule 
allows the members of the brigade one 
day in twelve, and an evening of five hours 
every fourth day. The balance of the time 
they are on duty day and night." 

From Vancouver it was reported that a 
three-year agreement had been signed by 
The World Printing and Publishing Com- 
pany and Local 226 of the International 
Typographical Union that provided a gradu- 
ated reduction from a day of seven and a 
half hours to a day of seven hours. Wages 
were set at $5 a day for day workers and 
$5.50 for night workers. The old rates had 
been $25 for a week of six seven-and-a- 
half-hour days for day work, and $27 for 
a week of the same length for night workers. 

At the same time, another three-year 
agreement signed by the same company and 
Local 88 of the International Stereographers 
and Electrotypers' Union provided for a 
continuance of the eight-hour day, but gave 
a wage increase of $1 a day all round. 
Foremen were to receive $31, and journey- 
men $27 a week. The contract stipulated 
that the foreman was to be a member of 
the union. 

Workmen employed by the City of 
Toronto, including waterworks labourers, 
inspectors, engineers, firemen, oilers and 
tree-trimmers, numbering about 120, were 
given increases in pay ranging from $1.50 
to $3 a week. 



The strike of coal miners at Springhill, 
which began on August 11, 1909, (L.G., 
Aug., 1959, p. 815) was reported to be 
still going on, although "the mines con- 
tinued to be operated to a limited extent." 
The strike, which involved about 1,000 
members of the United Mine Workers, 
resulted from the refusal of the Cumberland 
Railway and Coal Company to recognize 
the union as bargaining agent for the men, 
and to grant wage increases and certain 
improvements in working conditions. 

The conviction on a charge of manslaugh- 
ter of a former signalman in a signal tower 
of the CPR at a siding near Winnipeg was 
reported in the Labour Gazette of February 
1911. The man was said to have been 
"very drunk" while on duty. By throwing 
a switch, he derailed an approaching train. 
The fireman, who jumped out, fell under 
the locomotive and was killed. The watch- 
man was sentenced to four years in Stony 
Mountain penitentiary. 

The Gazette said that during 1910 some 
1,330 miles of new railway had been com- 
pleted in Canada. Of this amount, 500 miles 
had been laid in Saskatchewan. Railway 
building activity in 1911 was expected to 
be equal to, or greater than that of 1910. 

The total number of immigrants who 
arrived in Canada during the period April 
in October 1910 was given in the Labour 
Gazette as 227,775, compared with a total 
of 138,172 during the corresponding period 
of 1909. Of the 1910 total, 85,246 came 
from the United States and the remainder 
through ocean ports. 

A statement presented to a Royal Com- 
mission appointed to inquire into Chinese 
immigration showed that during the first 
two years after the imposition of a $500 
head tax, effective January 1, 1904, Chinese 
immigration practically stopped. Only four 
persons arrived in 1904 and eight in 1905. 
The next year the number rose to 50. 

In the following four years, the totals 
were: 1907—745; 1908—893; 1909—469; 
1910—1,286. The total in the 1904-1910 
period was 3,455. 

In 1909, homestead entries in the Prairie 
Provinces and British Columbia totalled 
37,061; in 1910, the total was 48,257. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



149 



INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



Social Consequences of Coal-Mining Crisis 

ILO tripartite technical meeting, declaring that coal remains most important 
energy source despite appearance of new sources, calls attention to need for 
governments to promote policy to enable industry to maintain place in economy 



"Despite the appearance of new sources 
of energy on a large scale, coal remains, 
and will remain for a long time to come, 
the most important source of energy and 
primary products in the modern economy." 

This statement is among the conclusions 
adopted by the Tripartite Technical Meet- 
ing convened by the International Labour 
Organization to consider the social con- 
sequences of the coal crisis. The meeting, 
held in Geneva from January 16 to 26, was 
called in accordance with a resolution 
adopted in May 1959 by the ILO Coal 
Mines Committee (L.G. 1959, p. 607). 

The meeting noted that the current state 
of crisis, despite its seriousness, in no way 
implies that the existence of the coal-mining 
industry, even in the more distant future, 
may be in question. The meeting believed, 
however, that "the attention of governments 
should be drawn to the paramount need to 
promote, in each country concerned, a 
policy to enable the coal-mining industry 
to maintain an essential position within each 
national economy . . . 

"It is essential for the industry and for 
each of the producing countries to ensure 
that the emergency measures which have 
been or may still be taken to reduce pro- 
duction by means of lower levels of employ- 
ment should not, in any way, damage the 
substance of the coal-mining industry, i.e., 
its manpower and all the other elements 
which ensure its productive capacity." 

The meeting enumerated a series of mea- 
sures, some temporary and others of a 
permanent character, that might be taken 
into consideration in view of the particular 
conditions prevailing in different countries 
and in different mining undertakings. 

The temporary measures are intended to 
mitigate in the short run the effects of lower 
levels of employment on the workers. 

"Others are of a permanent nature; their 
purpose is to counteract the disturbances 
which might have been and may still be 



caused by the exceptional and temporary 
measures taken during the acute stage of the 
crisis; to restore and to maintain the 
confidence of the workers in mining; to 
strengthen the manpower structure of coal 
mines; and to provide for this manpower, 
from the labourer to the engineer, condi- 
tions of employment which are socially 
satisfactory and as stable as possible." 

The meeting insisted that the elaboration 
and application of the temporary measures 
should be facilitated by consultations and 
by co-operation between mine undertakings 
and workers' organizations, and, if appro- 
priate, with the participation of the govern- 
ment. 

The meeting estimated that the measures 
it had recommended can be applied with 
full effectiveness only if efforts are made 
to tackle the main causes of the crisis. 
Believing that it had to limit its role to 
suggesting the general lines which it is 
essential to follow for the restoration of 
the coal-mining industry, the meeting indi- 
cated: 

Without ignoring all other efforts which have 
been or may still be undertaken at different 
levels, the Tripartite Meeting considers that 
particular efforts should be undertaken and 
pursued for the following motives: 

(a) to maintain the coal-mining industry as 
one of the essential elements of each national 
economy, both as a producer of a source of 
energy and as a producer of a raw material 
for new industries or new techniques; 

(b) to proceed, in those countries where the 
need is apparent, to an internal reorganization 
of the coal-mining industry by revising its 
means and possibilities, adjusting its programs 
and improving its internal and external methods 
of organization; 

(c) either to put into effect or to pursue 
systematically a co-ordinated national fuel 
policy in order to establish the best possible 
balance between the coal-mining industry and 
the other sources of energy, and to enable 
the coal-mining industry to adapt itself 
smoothly to the development of other forms 
of energy; 



150 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



(d) to complete national fuel policies, includ- 
ing the co-ordination of various forms of 
energy, in co-operation with the regional and 
international bodies competent in the field; 

(e) to obtain, in the countries where the 
need arises, the assistance of the authorities in 
order to enable the coal-mining industry to 
settle the acute social problems it faces and, 
at the same time, to increase its efficiency and 
improve its productivity so as to withstand the 
competition of other forms of energy. 

The meeting expressed the wish that "the 
Governing Body, after having examined the 
conclusions, will draw the attention of 
governments, the coal-mining industry and 
the international organizations competent to 
deal with economic and social problems to 
the conclusions so that they will take into 
consideration the measures suggested with 
a view to counteracting the social con- 
sequences of the crisis in the coal-mining 
industry." 

The Coal Crisis 

Since the beginning of 1958, the coal- 
mining industry in a number of countries 
has been in serious difficulties, causing acute 
concern to governments as well as to the 
employers and workers directly concerned, 
states a report prepared by the International 
Labour Office for the meeting. 

The ILO report reproduces statistics show- 
ing the trends in the consumption of coal 
from 1950 to 1959 in certain Western 
European countries, in the United States 
and in Japan. 

The report notes that "the fall in coal 
consumption is due to a combination of 
many factors, chief among which are the 
weather and the level of water supplies, 
fluctuations in industrial activity, and struc- 
tural factors such as greater fuel efficiency 
and the displacement of coal by other forms 
of energy . . . The most important reason is 
the influence of structural factors, parti- 
cularly the faster displacement of coal by 
petroleum products — a process which has 
largely been due to the unfavourable shift 
in the ratio of coal and oil prices." 

Examining the social consequences of the 
coal crisis, the report gives statistical infor- 



mation on the reduction in the labour force, 
slackening in recruitment, dismissals, unem- 
ployment, and short-time work. It states that 
"the coal industries in all the countries that 
have been considered (with the exception of 
The Netherlands, where there have been 
no major difficulties) have been forced 
to cut down their labour force, sometimes 
quite substantially. In all countries, normal 
wastage has no longer been made good by 
recruitment, although in some instances, re- 
cruitment had merely been slowed down . . . 

"Problems are due to the difficulty en- 
countered by some classes of miners (for 
purely personal reasons) in moving into 
other occupations or the lack of alternative 
employment in some mining areas, where 
the economic structure is not very diver- 
sified and there are few other opportunities 
available. In some coal-producing coun- 
tries, the mines have had to reduce their 
output and introduce short-time work." 

Concerning the slowing down or complete 
cessation of recruiting, one of the methods 
used to permit reductions in the labour force 
without leading to a major clash, the report 
notes: 

"While this has the advantage of reducing 
the labour force without depriving miners 
of their jobs, it has a number of serious 
long-term drawbacks. Clearly if one par- 
ticular industry ... is in the throes of a 
crisis at a time of general economic expan- 
sion, voluntary wastage is not only likely 
to be greater than the industry can afford 
but may be so indiscriminate as to be a 
threat even to the thoroughly efficient 
mines. The stoppage of recruitment has a 
further danger in that it completely distorts 
the age pyramid of the labour force." 

Participating in the meeting were govern- 
ments, employers and workers from Bel- 
gium, France, the Federal Republic of 
Germany, Great Britain, Japan, The Nether- 
lands and the United States. 

The United Nations, the O.E.E.C. and 
the European Coal and Steel Community 
were represented by observers, as were 
international organizations of employers 
and workers. 



ILO, Euratom Sign Agreement on Protection against Radiation 



David A. Morse, Director-General of the 
International Labour Office, and Heinz L. 
Krekeler, member of the Commission of 
the European Atomic Energy Community, 
last month signed an agreement concerning 
co-operation between the ILO and the 
EAEC in the field of the protection of 
workers against ionizing radiations. 



The agreement calls for consultations on 
questions of mutual interest, the possibility 
of the participation of observers at meetings 
organized by the ILO or the EAEC, the 
exchange of legislative and statistical infor- 
mation, and technical co-operation within 
the scope of the agreement. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196 1 



151 



TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



Savings of $90,000 may be realized by 
the city of Calgary through the success of 
its labour-management "safety push of 
1960." With the city employee accident rate 
down 25 per cent from the 1959 figure, the 
reduction in compensation costs might well 
reach that amount. 

Praising city departments generally for 
their achievement, Public Works Commis- 
sioner John Steel singled out the staff of 
St. George's Island zoo for its 11-year 
record of no lost-time accidents. He pre- 
sented an engraved plaque to zoo curator 
Tom Baines and personally congratulated 
each member of ithe 10-man crew. During 
the past year, the parks department as a 
whole reduced its accidents by almost one- 
third. 

Mr. Steel attributed the 1960 reduction 
in accidents and costs to the $5,000 "safety 
push" staged jointly by management and 
members of Local 37, National Union of 
Public Employees, CLC. The drive was 
directed by city safety supervisor Al Grassick. 
The expected saving of $90,000 is almost 
equal to the total budget of the city's person- 
nel department, which provides employment 
training, safety and classification services. 

Training in fire prevention and fire fight- 
ing is being given to paper machine crews 
and supervision at the Cornwall, Ont., divi- 
sion of Howard Smith Paper Mills. Accord- 
ing to The Paper Mill Log, employee news- 
paper, Cornwall Fire Chief L. A. Carriere 
and paper mill superintendent J. E. Taylor 
are providing the instruction for the courses 
which are aimed at protecting the lives of 
employees and the company's substantial 
investment in equipment. 

Plans are currently being made to extend 
the training program to other departments 
of the mill. 

* * * 

Guests attending the National Pulp and 
Paper Day celebrations of the St. Lawrence 
Corporation's Red Rock Mill in Red Rock, 
Ont., came from as far away as Detroit and 
Chicago. More than 1,000 persons — 530 
students and 523 adults — accepted the com- 
pany's invitation to the September "Open 
House" and plant tour arranged to mark 
the event. Members of the mill's labour- 
management Mutual Interest Committee 
planned and directed the extensive guest 
program. 



Following distribution of informative 
brochures containing a history of the mill 
and a description of pulp and paper making 
processes, visitors were briefed on facts 
pertinent to the plant tour. Mutual interest 
committee members and others guided the 
visitors in groups of 12 along a route which 
covered the entire paper manufacturing 
process from pulp logs to finished product. 

Labour representatives serving on the 
mutual interest committee are members of 
the CLC-affiliated brotherhoods of Pulp, 
Sulphite and Paper Mills Workers, Paper- 
makers and Electrical Workers, and of the 
Operating Engineers. 

* * * 

An idea of the labour-management com- 
mittee operating in the McKellar General 
Hospital at Fort William, Ont., now has the 
superintendent taking a walk one morning 
a week. It all started when the committee 
recommended that a space be reserved on 
patients' charts for comments and sugges- 
tions on how the hospital's service might be 
improved. Response from the patients was 
immediate; the committee has had to set 
aside a portion of its monthly meeting 
time in order to review their ideas. 

One of the proposals, made unanimously 
by four of the patients, suggested that hospi- 
tal Superintendent R. V. Johnston should 
visit the wards to chat with the patients 
more often. Not a man to let the committee 
down, Mr. Johnston now makes his rounds 
one morning a week. The results, he says, 
have been "extremely gratifying." 

Another proposal was that the hospital's 
ice manufacturing unit be fitted with a 
defrosting mechanism. Ultimately it was 
decided that a defroster was unnecessary; 
but during their discussions, LMC members 
requested a series of bacteria tests. Although 
the machine was found to be free of bac- 
teria, the methods used in getting ice 
delivered to the patients were considered 
poor. Shortly thereafter, a better type of 
container was purchased and an improved 
method of handling was devised. 

Bargaining agent for union members of 
the hospital staff is Local 268 of the Build- 
ing Service Employees International Union 
CLC. 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Committees is encouraged and assisted by 
the Labour-Management Co-operation Serv- 
ice, Industrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field representa- 
tives located in key industrial centres, who 
are available to help both managements and 
trade unions, the Service provides various 
aids in the form of booklets, posters and 
films. 



152 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board met 
for four days during December. The Board 
issued two certificates designating bargaining 
agents, ordered one representation vote and 
rejected three applications for certification. 
During the month the Board received 11 
applications for certification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. Warehousemen and Miscellaneous 
Drivers, Local 419 of the International Bro- 
therhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Ware- 
housemen, and Helpers of America, on 
behalf of a unit of mail pick-up and delivery 
drivers employed by John A. Snow, Willow- 
dale, Ont. (L.G., Jan., p. 43). 

2. Civil Service Association of Canada, 
Ottawa-Hull Local Council, on behalf of 
a unit of stationary engineers and firemen 
employed by the Central Mortgage and 
Housing Corporation in Ottawa in heating 
and power plants at the Head Office on 
Montreal Road, the Laurentian Terrace on 
Sussex Street and the Strathcona Heights 
Development on Mann Avenue (L.G., Jan., 
p. 44). 

Representation Vote Ordered 

The Montreal Harbour Police Brother- 
hood (Ind.), applicant and intervener, the 
National Harbour Board Police Brother- 
hood, Montreal, applicant and intervener, 
and the National Harbours Board, respond- 
ent (L.G., Oct. 1960, p. 1029 and Nov. 
1960, p. 1140). The Board directed that 
the names of both organizations be placed 
on the ballot, and that the voting unit com- 
prise employees in the Harbour Police Force 
and the Jacques Cartier Bridge police detail 
at Montreal (Returning Officer: C. E. 
Poirier). 

Applications for Certification Rejected 

1. Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers, Local Union 880, and the 
General Truck Drivers' Union, Local 938 



of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers of America, applicant, and Tank Truck 
Transport Limited Point Edward, Ont., 
respondent (L.G., Dec. 1960, p. 1293). The 
application was rejected because it was not 
supported by a majority of the employees 
eligible to cast ballots in the representation 
vote conducted by the Board. 

2. General Truck Drivers' Union, Local 
938 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, applicant, and Export 
Packers, Toronto, Ont., respondent (L.G., 
Oct. 1960, p. 1029). The application was 
rejected for the reason that the Board 
considered that it lacked jurisdiction. 

3. General Truck Drivers' Union, Local 
879 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, applicant, and Leslie 
Armstrong Mail Service, Owen Sound, Ont., 
respondent (L.G., Jan., p. 43). The applica- 
tion was rejected because it was not sup- 
ported by a majority of the employees 
eligible to cast ballots in the representation 
vote conducted by the Board. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. Seafarers' International Union of 
North America, Canadian District, on behalf 
of a unit of unlicensed personnel employed 
aboard vessels operated by the Sannie Trans- 
portation Co. Ltd., Vancouver (Investigating 
Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

2. International Association of Machinists, 
on behalf of a unit of cafeteria employees 
of Trans Canada Air Lines employed at 
its overhaul base at the Montreal Airport 
(Investigating Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

3. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, on behalf 
of a unit of employees of the Canadian 
National Railways employed in its Pur- 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



153 



chasing and Stores Accounting Centre at 
Winnipeg (Investigating Officer: W. E. 
Sproule). 

4. Seafarers' International Union of North 
America, Canadian District, on behalf of 
a unit of unlicensed personnel employed 
aboard vessels operated by the Northland 
Shipping Co. Ltd. (Investigating Oflficer: 
D. S. Tysoe). 

5. Transport Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers' Union, Local 106 of the Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America, on 
behalf of a unit of employees of Wm. C. 
Norris Ltd., Montreal (Investigating Officer: 
C. E. Poirier). 

6. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, on behalf 
of a unit of employees of the Canadian 
National Railways employed in its Purchases 
and Stores Accounting Centre, LeBer Street, 



Point St. Charles, Que. (Investigating Offi- 
cer: R. L. Fournier). 

8. Seafarers' International Union of North 
America, Canadian District, on behalf of 
a unit of marine engineers employed aboard 
vessels operated by the Abitibi Power & 
Paper Company Limited, Toronto (Investi- 
gating Officer: Remi Duquette). 

9. Seafarers' International Union of North 
America, Canadian District, on behalf of a 
unit of marine engineers employed aboard 
vessels operated by the Dominion Coal 
Company Limited, Sydney, N.S. (Investigat- 
ing Officer: Remi Duquette). 

10. Thunder Bay Lodge No. 10 of the 
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 
Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Sta- 
tion Employees, on behalf of a unit of 
electricians employed by Manitoba Pool 
Elevators in its grain elevator at Port Arthur, 
Ont. (Investigating Officer: J. S. Gunn). 



Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 



Conciliation services under the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
provided by the Minister of Labour through 
the Industrial Relations Branch. The Branch 
also acts as the administration arm of the 
Canada Labour Relations Board, in matters 
under the Act involving the Board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act came into force on Sep- 
tember 1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, 
w^hich became effective in March, 1944, and 
repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, which had been in force from 1907 
until superseded by the Wartime Regulations 
in 1944. Decisions,' orders and certificates 
given under the Wartime Regulations by the 
Minister of Labour and the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board are continued in force and 
effect by the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within 
federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, 
interprovincial and international steamship 
lines and ferries, aerodromes and air trans- 
portation, radio broadcasting stations and 
works declared by Parliament to be for the 
general advantage of Canada or two or 
more of its provinces. Additionally, the Act 
provides that provincial authorities, if they 
so desire, may enact similar legislation for 
application to industries within provincial 
jurisdiction and make mutually satisfactory 
arrangements with the federal Government 
for the administration of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with 
the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of con- 
ciliation officers, conciliation boards, and 
Industrial Inquiry Commissions concerning 
complaints that the Act has been violated 
or that a party has failed to bargain collec- 
tively, and for application for consent to 
prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is 
established under the Act as successor to 



the Wartime Labour Relations Board to 
administer provisions concerning the certi- 
fication of bargaining agents, the writing of 
provisions — for incorporation into collective 
agreements — fixing a procedure for the final 
settlement of disputes concerning the mean- 
ing or violation of such agreements and the 
investigation of complaints referred to it by 
the minister that a party has failed to 
bargain collectively and to make every 
reasonable effort to conclude a collective 
agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of 
Procedure of the Canadian Labour Relations 
Board are available upon request to the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported below under two headings: (1) 
Certification and other Proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board, and 
(2) Conciliation and other Proceedings 
before the Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the De- 
partment of Labour are stationed at Vancou- 
ver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, New- 
foundland. The territory of four officers 
resident in Vancouver comprise British 
Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon and 
Northwest Territories; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the province of Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba and Northwestern 
Ontario; four officers resident in Toronto 
confine their activities to Ontario; five 
officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three 
officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and 
St. John's represent the Department in the 
Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of Industrial Rela- 
tions and staff are situated in Ottawa. 



154 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



11. Thunder Bay Lodge No. 10 of the 
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 
Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Sta- 
tion Employees, on behalf of a unit of 



electricians employed by the Saskatchewan 
Wheat Pool in its Terminal Elevator Divi- 
sion at Fort -William and Port Arthur, Ont. 
(Investigating Officer: J. S. Gunn). 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During December, the Minister of Labour 
appointed conciliation officers to deal with 
the following disputes: 

1. Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited, 
Saskatoon, and Local 342 of the Cereal 
Workers Division of the United Packing- 
house Workers of America (Conciliation 
Officer: J. S. Gunn). 

2. Quebec Central Transportation Com- 
pany, Sherbrooke, Que., and Canadian 
Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and 
General Workers (Conciliation Officer: R. 
Duquette). 

3. Pacific Western Airlines Ltd., Van- 
couver, and Lodge No. 1500 of the Inter- 
national Association of Machinists (Con- 
ciliation Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

4. Consolidated Freightways, North Burn- 
aby, B.C., and Office Employees' Interna- 
tional Union, Local 15 (Conciliation Officer: 
G. R. Currie). 

5. Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited, 
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, and Local 201, 
United Packinghouse Workers of America 
(Conciliation Officer: J. S. Gunn). 



Settlements Reported by Conciliation Officers 

1. Vancouver Barge Transportation Lim- 
ited, Vancouver, and Local 512, Interna- 
tional Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's 
Union (Conciliation Officer: G. R. Currie) 
(L.G., Dec. 1960, p. 1295). 

2. Vancouver Barge Transportation Lim- 
ited, Vancouver, and Marine Engineers 
Local 425 of the Canadian Brotherhood of 
Railway, Transport and General Workers, 
and Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc., 
(Conciliation Officer: G. R. Currie) (L.G., 
Aug. 1960, p. 815). 

3. Holden Sand & Gravel Limited, 
Toronto, and Seafarers' International Union 
of North America, Canadian District (Con- 
ciliation Officer: F. J. Ainsborough) (L.G., 
May 1960, p. 467). 

Settlement after Conciliation Board Procedure 

1. Hull City Transport Ltd., and Hull 
City Transport Employees Union (L.G., 
Dec. 1960, p. 1295). The text of the Board 
report is reproduced below. 



Report of Board In Dispute between 

Hull City Transport Limited, Hull, Que. 

and 

Hull City Transport Employees' Union 



This Board, which was definitely estab- 
lished on October 20, 1960, under the Indus- 
trial Relations Act 1948 c. 54, consisted of 
Jacques Bertrand, representing the em- 
ployer; Jean-Robert Gauthier, representing 
the Union; and, on the joint recommenda- 
tion of these two men, Jean Girouard as 
chairman. 

Public hearings were held in Hull, in the 
Municipal Court premises, on November 21 
and December 1 and 2, 1960. On December 
2 and 3, 1960, meetings of discussion took 



During December, the Minister of Labour 
received the unanimous report of the Board 
of Conciliation and Investigation established 
to deal with a dispute between HuU City 
Transport Ltd., Hull, Que., and the Hull 
City Transport Employees' Union. 

The Board was under the chairmanship 
of Jean Girouard, Montreal, who was 
appointed by the Minister on the joint 
recommendation of the other two members, 
Jacques Bertrand, Hull, Que., and Jean- 
Robert Gauthier, Montreal, nominees of the 
company and union respectively. 

The text of the report is reproduced here. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



155 



place in Hull, and the parties have separ- 
ately consented to so-called conciliation 
interviews. 

The matters in dispute referred to the 
Conciliation Board, according to the report 
made by conciliation officer Remi Duquette, 
were the following: 

Holidays with pay; 

Sick leave; 

Workmen's compensation; 

Weekly rest; 

Paid statutory holidays; 

Wages. 

The only matters in dispute which the 
parties, at the time of the public hearings, 
agreed to submit to this Board were the 
following, in accordance with the draft 
agreement submitted by the union as exhibit 
S-2: 

Section 6.04: Holidays; 

Section 7.01: illness and group insur- 
ance; 

Section 8: policy in case of illness; 

Section 9: work accidents; 

Sectionll: weekly holidays; 

Section 12: paid holidays; 

Section 13: discipline; 

Section 19: wage schedule (drivers); 

Section 20: paragraphs b), c) and d): 
clothing (drivers); 

Section 20.01: working periods; 

Section 20.03: working periods; 

Section 20.09: working periods; 

Section 20.12: regular work week; 

Section 20.13: over-time pay; 

Section 21.00: clothing (garage employ- 
ees); 

Section 21.05: wage schedule (garage 
ployees). 

After having heard the parties and re- 
ceived their respective evidence; after having 
deliberated, and having taken the circum- 
stances into consideration, the Board unan- 
imously arrived at the following conclusions: 

Holidays (section 6.04 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends a clause which 
reads as follows: 

If, on May 1 of a year, the employee 
has twelve years of service, he has the right 
to an annual holiday of twenty-one (21; 
consecutive days, with pay, at the rate of 
6 per cent of wages earned during the 
twelve months preceding the 1st of May 
of each year. 

Illness and Group Insurance (section 7.01 of 
exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends the enforcement 
of section 7.01 of exhibit S-2, as it stands 
at present. 



Policy in case of illness (section 8 of 
exhibit S-2) 

The unanimous recommendation of the 
Board on this subject is contained in the 
following three clauses: 

8.00 In a case of illness, every employee 
with at least a year's service is entitled to 
his regular wages based on the equivalent 
of eight (8) hours a day, for a total equal 
to three quarters (!) of a working day for 
every month's service with the employer. 

8.01 The sick leave which has not been 
taken will be accumulated from year to 
year to the credit of the employee, up to 
a maximum of three (3) months. When 
the employee leaves, he will be paid for 
the accumulated days. 

8.02 Whenever he is absent, the em- 
ployee will inform, or will have someone 
inform his immediate superior as soon as 
possible, and, upon request by his employer, 
he will have to furnish proof of his illness 
and/or undergo examination by a doctor 
designated by the employer. 

Work accidents (section 9 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends that, in the case 
of an accident which occurred or illness 
which was contracted in the course or on 
account of their work, the injured or sick 
employees receive the equivalent of the 
compensation provided for by the Work- 
men's Compensation Act for the Province 
of Quebec. 

Weekly holidays (section 11 of exhibit S~2) 
The Boaord recommends that each em- 
ployee be entitled to a weekly holiday of 
at least twenty-four (24) consecutive hours 
in accordance with the schedule of working 
hours agreed upon by both parties. 

Paid holidays (section 12 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends the enforcement 
of the following text: 

The following days will be paid holidays: 
New Year's Day, Epiphany, Easter, Labour 
Day, Christmas. 

An employee who does not work on 
these days receives the equivalent of eight 
hours of work. All work done during one 
of these days is paid for at the rate of one 
and one half (H) the rate of the employee's 
regular wages. 

Discipline (section 13 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends the enforcement 
of Section 13.00 of exhibit S-2, as it stands 
at present. 



156 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



Wage schedule (drivers) (section 19 of 
exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends the following 
hourly wage schedules: 

(a) Retroactive to August 1, 1960 (the 
previous agreement between the parties hav- 
ing expired on July 31, 1960) 

First six (6) months $1.19 

From 7th to 12th month $1.24 

After one (1) year $1.36 

After two (2) years $1.40 

(b) From the date of the signing of the 
next agreement (and taking into considera- 
tion the reduction of the regular work week 
from 54 to 48 hours) 

First six (6 months $1.39 

From 7th to 12th month $1.45 

After one (1) year $1.61 

After two (2) years $1.63 

(c) From six (6) months after the signing 
of the next agreement: 

First six (6) months $1.44 

From 7th to 12th month $1.50 

After one (1) year $1.66 

After two (2) years $1.68 

XXX — ^The Board unanimously recom- 
mends the abolition of extra pay at $0.10 
an hour for outside routes. 

Clothing (drivers) (section 20, (a), (b) 
(c) and (d) of exhibit S-2 

The Board recommends the following 
clause (b): 

(b) two (2) shirts and one (1) tie in 
the Spring, summer and autumn of each 
year; 

As for the other two clauses (c) and (d) 
of Section 20, the Board states that as a 
rule, the drivers should wear a complete 
outfit provided by the employer. However, 
in view of the circumstances referred to by 
the parties, the Board recommends that the 
parties come to an agreement as soon as 
possible on this subject. 

Working periods (section 20.01, 20.03 and 
20.09 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends the enforcement 
of the following clauses: 
20.01 Except as otherwise agreed upon 
by the parties, the working periods for 
every day with the exception of Saturdays, 
Sundays and the holidays herein stipul- 
ated in section 12.00 should not exceed 
five (5) continuous hours. 
20.03 The working periods out on the 
road will form a total of working hours 
varying from eight hours and fifteen 
minutes to eight hours and forty-five 
minutes (8:15 to 8:45), distributed over 
a maximum period of thirteen (13) hours. 
20.09 For every working period, as well 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



as for all reporting time, compulsory 
or required by the employer, each driver 
(including the supernumeries or "spares" 
who are not regulars) should be paid for 
at least the equivalent of two (2) hours 
of work at straight time. 

Regular work week 

(section 20.12 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends a regular work 
week of forty-eight (48) hours, distributed 
over five and one-half days (5i) for a 
period of seven (7) days. 

Overtime pay 

(section 20.13 of exhibits S-2) 

The Board recommends the enforcement 
of section 20.13 of exhibit S-2 as it stands 
at present, except for the words "46 hours 
and 45 minutes" in the last lines which 
should be replaced by "forty-eight (48) 
hours". 

Clothing (garage employees) 
(section 21.00 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends the following 
clause: 

21.00 The employer will supply at his 
own expense every year: 

(a) two pairs of over-alls to employees 
whose work requires the wearing of such 
clothing. 

(b) two pairs of trousers and two work 
shirts to the other employees. 

All of which will be cleaned at the 
expense of the employer. 

Wage schedules (garage employees) 

(section 21.05 of exhibit S-2) 

The Board recommends, for garage 
employees, wage adjustments similar to 
those recommended above in the case of 
drivers. 

Seeing that precise classifications with 
related wage schedules do not exist yet for 
garage employees, the Board finds it impos- 
sible to take on and consider the case of 
each employee; however it strongly recom- 
mends that the parties correct this state of 
affairs. 

Since the principles which served as a 
base for the above-mentioned conclusions 
concerning drivers' wages apply mutadis 
mutandis, the Board quotes as an example 
the case of helpers receiving $1.03i an 
hour in accordance with the collective agree- 
ment which has expired. 

(a) Retroactive to August 1, 1960: 
$1.03iplus$0.10==$1.13i 

Continued on page 179) 

157 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 



Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench rules buyer of bankrupt business is not bound 
by existing collective agreement, quashes Labour Relations Board's decision. 
Ontario High Court rules that truck carrier comes under federal jurisdiction. 



In Manitoba, the Court of Queen's Bench 
ruled that a buyer of a bankrupt business 
is not bound by the terms of a collective 
agreement which, at the time of purchase, 
was in force between the bankrupt company 
and its employees. 

In Ontario, the High Court granted an 
order prohibiting the Magistrates Court 
from proceeding with a charge laid under 
the Ontario Labour Relations Act and ruled 
that a truck carrier, because some of its 
activities regularly connected Ontario with 
Quebec and extended beyond the limits of 
Ontario, was subject to the federal Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act. 

Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench. . . 

. . . holds purchaser of assets of bankrupt business 
not bound by the existing collective agreement 

On September 19, 1960, Mr. Justice 
Bastin of the Manitoba Court of Queen's 
Bench ruled that a mere buyer of the assets 
of a bankrupt business does not, on the 
strength of his purchase, become a person 
to whom has passed "the ownership of the 
business" within the meaning of Section 
18(1) (c) of the Manitoba Labour Rela- 
tions Act. Therefore he is not bound by 
the collective agreement made previously 
between the bankrupt concern and its em- 
ployees. 

Parkhill Bedding and Furniture Limited 
purchased for cash all the physical assets of 
Trysson Manufacturing Limited, a bankrupt 
company, including its plant, equipment and 
stock, but not its accounts receivable and 
goodwill, and took possession of them on 
March 7, 1960. 

Afterwards, the company engaged some, 
but not all, of the former employees of the 
bankrupt company and reopened the factory. 

The certified bargaining agent of Park- 
hill's employees was Local 35 of the 
Upholsterers' International Union of North 
America, and there was a subsisting collec- 
tive agreement with the union. The certified 



bargaining agent of the former employees 
of the bankrupt company was Local 174 of 
the International Molders' and Foundry 
Workers Union of North America, and it 
had a collective agreement with the em- 
ployer that provided for an increase of 
wages on March 1, 1960. 

On May 12, Local 174 applied to the 
Manitoba Labour Board for a ruling that 
it was the certified bargaining agent of the 
employees in the factory previously operated 
by the bankrupt Trysson company and now 
operated by the Parkhill company, and that 
under Section 18 (1) (c) of the Labour 
Relations Act the collective agreement 
between it and the bankrupt company was 
binding upon the Parkhill company with 
respect to the employees in the factory 
previously owned by the bankrupt company. 
After several hearings the Manitoba 
Labour Board made its order, No. 32 dated 
June 28, 1960, which, in part, reads as 
follows: 

5. After consideration of evidence and argu- 
ment heard the Board found as follows: 

That pursuant to and for the purposes of 
Section 18 (1) (c) of the Act, the business in 
respect of which a certificate and an agree- 
ment existed between Trysson Manufacturing 
Limited and the International Molders & 
Foundry Workers Union of North America, 
Local 174, passed to Parkhill Bedding and 
Furniture Limited and that the said agree- 
ment is in full force and effect and binding 
upon Parkhill Bedding and Furniture Limited 
in respect of its Trysson Division. 

Following this order, the Parkhill com- 
pany applied to the court for an order of 
certiorari to quash the Board's order No. 32. 
Section 18 (1) (c) of the Manitoba La- 
bour Relations Act reads: 

S. 18 (1) A collective agreement entered into 

by a certified bargaining agent is, subject to and 

for the purposes of this Act, binding upon 

(c) any new employer to whom passes the 

ownership of the business of an employer 

who has entered into the agreement or 

on whose behalf the agreement has been 

entered into. 



This section, prepared by the Legislation Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



158 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



The Board based its order upon a finding 
that the business passed to a new employer 
but did not use the words of the statute 
"the ownership of the business," presum- 
ably because the facts before the Board did 
not justify a finding that the ownership 
of the business had passed. 

In Mr. Justice Bastin's opinion, the sale 
in question was of assets and not the sale 
of a business. The Act is quite clear that 
a collective agreement is to be binding on 
a new employer only when the ownership of 
the business has passed to him. Since the 
Board did not make a finding that the 
ownership of the business had passed, it 
was an error in law, evident on the face of 
the record, to order that the collective 
agreement entered into by Trysson should 
bind the Parkhill company. 

Further, Mr. Justice Bastin stated that 
in certain respects the Labour Relations Act 
introduces new rights and duties into the 
relations of master and servant but only 
to the extent that these are clearly ex- 
pressed. In the case of the purchase of an 
ongoing business, the buyer assumes the 
obligations of employer under subsisting 
contracts of employment with individual 
employees. It is reasonable that the buyer 
should also assume the employer's obliga- 
tions under a collective agreement which 
affects the terms of employment of the 
continuing employees. This is the effect of 
Section 18 (1) (c) of the Labour Relations 
Act. 

However, Mr. Justice Bastin added, a 
collective agreement is related to the em- 
ployees of a business and not to its plant, 
goodwill or other assets. The buyer of the 
assets of a bankrupt business does not, on 
the strength of his purchase of these assets, 
assume any obligation toward the former 
employees of the bankrupt business and 
should not be held to have assumed any 
obligations under a collective agreement 
entered into by the bankrupt concern. 

The Court quashed the Manitoba Labour 
Board Order No. 32 on the ground that 
there was an error in law on the face of 
the record. Re Parkhill Furniture and Bed- 
ding Limited, {I960), 33 W.W.R., Part 4, 
p. 176. 

Ontario High Court... 

...rules truck carrier engaged in interconnecting 
undertaking within scope of federal jurisdiction 

On August 2, 1960, Mr. Justice McLen- 
nan of the Ontario High Court held that a 
carrier engaged in an undertaking which 
continuously and regularly connected On- 
tario with Queibec and extended beyond 
the limits of Ontario fell within Section 



92 (10) (a) of the B.N.A. Act, thus being 
subject to the federal Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act; the federal 
jurisdiction was not affected by the fact that 
the interprovincial and international business 
was not the main or substantial part of the 
carrier's undertaking. 

Tank Truck Transport Ltd. is a private 
company incorporated under the Ontario 
Corporations Act with head office in Sarnia, 
Ont. The company has been engaged exclu- 
sively as a common and contract carrier in 
the transportation of industrial fluids and 
chemicals in Ontario and to some extent 
between Ontario and Quebec and from the 
United States to Ontario. 

A local of the International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers of America was certified in 
1954 by the Ontario Labour Relations 
Board under the Ontario Labour Relations 
Act as bargaining agent for the employees 
of the company. A succession of collective 
bargaining agreements were entered into 
between the company and the union. 

Under one of these agreements, arbitra- 
tion proceedings were held and the arbi- 
tration board directed the company to 
re-employ one of its employees and to pay 
him wages as directed in the award. Appar- 
ently the company was not willing to 
comply with the award, because the em- 
ployee concerned, a member of the Team- 
sters union, laid a charge under Section 
32 (4) of the Ontario Labour Relations 
Act against the company in the Magistrates 
Court in Toronto because of the company's 
failure to comply with the award. 

Then the company applied for an order 
prohibiting the Magistrate from proceeding 
with the charge on the ground that the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act did not apply 
to the labour relations between the com- 
pany and its employees, as these relations 
are subject to the federal Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act because the 
company's undertaking fell within the ex- 
clusive jurisdiction of the Parliament of 
Canada under Section 91 (29) and Section 
92 (10) (a) of the B.N.A. Act. 

Section 91 (29) confers on the Parliament 
of Canada legislative authority over the 
exceptions to the powers granted to the 
provinces by Section 92. Section 92 (10) (a) 
gives the provinces legislative power to 
make laws in relation to 

10. Local works and undertakings, other than 
such as are of the following classes: 

(a) Lines of steam or other ships, railways, 
canals, telegraphs, and other works and 
undertakings connecting the Province 
with any other or others of the Prov- 
inces, or extending beyond the limits of 
the Province. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



159 



The company contended that the extent 
of its operations beyond Ontario into Quebec 
and into the United States was such that 
it was a work and undertaking connecting 
Ontario with Quebec beyond the limits of 
Ontario within the meaning of the excep- 
tion in Section 92 (10) (a), and fell within 
the exclusive legislative authority of the 
Parliament of Canada under Section 91 (29). 

Counsel for the employee contended that 
the company's operation was not a "con- 
necting" or "extending" undertaking within 
Section 92 (10) (a) but a local one within 
the meaning of the opening words of 
Section 92 (10), and that the labour rela- 
tions in question were clearly matters relat- 
ing to "Property and Civil Rights in the 
Province" under Section 92 (13), and the 
proper legislative authority to deal with 
them was the Province of Ontario. 

Section 53 of the federal Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act reads, 
in part, as follows: 

S. 53. Part I applies in respect of employees 
who are employed upon or in connection with 
the operation of any work, undertaking or 
business that is within the legislative authority 
of the Parliament of Canada including, but not 
so as to restrict the generality of the foregoing. 

(a) works, undertakings or businesses oper- 
ated or carried on for or in connection 
with navigation and shipping, whether 
inland or maritime, including the oper- 
ation of ships and transportation by ship 
anywhere in Canada; 

(b) railways, canals, telegraphs and other 
works and undertakings connecting a 
province with any other or others of the 
provinces, or extending beyond the limits 
of a province; 

and in respect of the employers of all such 
employees in their relations with such employees 
and in respect of trade unions and employers' 
organizations composed of such employees or 
employers. 

The validity of the federal Act was 
tested in the Stevedores' case {Reference re 
Validity of Industrial Relations and Dis- 
putes Investigation Act (Can.) and Applic- 
ability in Respect of Certain Employees of 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Co. (L.G. 
1955, p. 952); there were some qualifications 
expressed in some of the judgments with 
respect to clause (a) of Section 53, but 
there was no qualification so far as clause 
(b) is concerned and the powers of the 
federal Parliament to legislate in relation to 
the matters set out in that clause are not 
in question. 

In 1959, the company employed 70 
drivers who operated 49 truck units and 
70 tank trailers, and held licences or 
authorizations to carry goods from the 
provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and from 
the Interstate Commerce Commission of 
the U.S.A. 



In 1959, the company completed a total 
of 630 trips between points within Ontario 
and points outside Ontario, of which approx- 
imately 435 were between Ontario and 
Quebec and 195 between Ontario and the 
United States. The trips outside Ontario 
amounted to about 6 per cent of all the 
trips carried out by the company in 1959. 
There were no separate operating divisions 
within the company either as to employees 
or equipment with references to provincial 
or extraprovincial trips. 

The company's operations, so far as Que- 
bec was concerned, were not merely to 
points just over the border between the 
provinces, but for the most part extended 
well into Quebec. The trips were not made 
according to a time-table such as a bus 
service would be, but with reasonable 
regularity over the year. Excluding Sundays 
and holidays, there were approximately 
two trips beyond Ontario each day in the 
year, of which 70 per cent were between 
Ontario and Quebec. 

Certain propositions of law and of fact 
in the case under review were not in 
dispute. Both parties agreed, for instance, 
that the company's undertaking was a single 
and indivisible one, not capable of sever- 
ance, so that one part would fall under the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act and the other 
under the Dominion Act; that the work of 
the employees concerned was an integral 
part of the company's undertaking, and 
that, if the undertaking in question was 
within federal jurisdiction, its labour rela- 
tions were also. 

The company submitted, on the authority 
of the Winner case {A.G. Ont et al. v. 
Winner et al. (L.G. 1954, p. 559)), and on 
the evidence that showed a regular and 
continuous company's operation between 
Quebec and Ontario and between Ontario 
and the United States, that the company's 
undertaking connected Ontario and Quebec 
and extended beyond the limits of Ontario. 

The employee's counsel, while conceding 
that the company's undertaking in a sense 
connected the provinces and in a sense 
extended beyond the limits of Ontario into 
the United States, submitted that for an 
undertaking to fall within Section 92 (10) (a) 
of the B.N. A. Act, either its "connecting" 
or "extending" activity must be its main, 
primary, or essential function, or that under- 
taking must be of national interest and 
concern. 

With respect to the theory as to the main 
or primary function, counsel for the em- 
ployee relied on two main facts; the small 
percentage of extra-provincial activity in 
relation to the whole undertaking, and the 



160 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



limitations in the licences issued to the com- 
pany by the Province of Quebec and the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Mr. Justice McLennan did not agree that 
limitations in these licences were of signi- 
ficance. In the Stevedores' case, the court 
decided that it was what the company 
actually did, not what it had power to do, 
that should be considered. In his opinion, 
the only basis for determining what was 
the main, essential or primary function of 
the company would be the comparative 
volume of activity. The percentage figures 
of the company's activity showed that 94 
per cent was within the province of Ontario 
and only 6 per cent beyond it. Therefore, 
there was no doubt that the extraprovincial 
activity was not the main or primary func- 
tion of the undertaking. 

Counsel for the employee argued that 
if the relative volume of activity were 
ignored, it would mean that any extra- 
provincial transportation, however slight and 
insignificant a portion of the total, would 
bring such an undertaking under federal 
jurisdiction, with a corresponding invasion 
of civil rights within the province. 

Counsel for the company argued that 
the question was not the relative amount of 
intraprovincial and extraprovincial activity, 
but rather whether in fact there was a 
"connecting" or "extending" activity regard- 
less of whether the activity in the province 
was large or small by comparison. 

In the Winner case, the company oper- 
ated a bus service providing a daily service 
from Boston, Mass., through New Bruns- 
wick to Glace Bay, N.S., and points between. 
The Supreme Court of Canada and the 
Privy Council held that the operation of 
the bus line was an undertaking connecting 
New Brunswick with Nova Scotia and ex- 
tending beyond the limits of New Brunswick 
and therefore was an undertaking within 
head 10 (a) of S. 92 and thus within 
federal jurisdiction. The Supreme Court 
of Canada held that a distinction could be 
drawn between what was essential, i.e., the 
interprovincial and international component 
of the company's activity on the one hand, 
and the incidental intraprovincial com- 
ponent on the other, and that the incidental 
part of the company's activity was within 
provincial jurisdiction. But the Privy Coun- 
cil came to a different conclusion and held 
that no valid distinction could be drawn 
between what was essential and what was 
incidental; that in interpreting Section 92 
(10) (a) of the B.N.A. Act, the question 
is not what portions of the undertaking 
could be stripped from it without interfering 
with the activity altogether, but what is 
the undertaking which is in fact being 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196 1 

92006-6—5 



carried on. The Privy Council came to the 
conclusion that the undertaking in question 
was in fact one and indivisible and the fact 
that it might have been carried on differently 
did not make it or any part of it any the 
less an interconnecting undertaking. Con- 
sequently, the whole undertaking was held 
to be within federal jurisdiction. 

Mr. Justice McLennan noted that in the 
Winner case the substantial or essential part 
of the undertaking was interprovincial and 
international while the incidental part was 
provincial. In the case at bar, the situation 
was reversed. Based on this factual dis- 
tinction, Counsel for the employee argued 
that the Winner case was authority for the 
proposition that if an undertaking was either 
essentially extraprovincial or essentially pro- 
vincial, then the incidental part of such an 
undertaking, if it is an indivisible one, 
should go along with the essential part. 

In support of this argument, he relied 
on the following passage from the judgment 
of Lord Porter in the Winner case: 

In coming to this conclusion their Lordships 
must not be supposed to lend any countenance 
to the suggestion that a carrier who is substan- 
tially an internal carrier can put himself outside 
provincial jurisdiction by starting his activities 
a few miles over the border. Such a subterfuge 
would not avaU him. The question is whether in 
truth and in fact there is an internal activity 
prolonged over the border in order to enable 
the owner to evade provincial jurisdiction or 
whether in pith and substances it is inter- 
provincial. Just as the question whether there 
is an interconnecting undertaking is one depend- 
ing on all the circumstances of the case so the 
question whether it is camouflaged local under- 
taking masquerading as an interconnecting one 
must also depend on the facts of each case 
and on a determination of what is the pith 
and substance of an Act or Regulation. 

Counsel for the employee conceded that 
the quotation dealt with "subterfuge" and 
"camouflaged local undertaking," but he also 
argued that it supported his contention as 
to the real meaning of the decision. 

Mr. Justice McLennan did not agree with 
this interpretation. In his opinion, the quota- 
tion means that a carrier cannot evade 
provincial jurisdiction by creating an appear- 
ance of an interconnecting undertaking by 
extending his activities for that purpose 
across a provincial border. In such a case, 
comparative volume would undoubtedly be 
significant, along with other factors, to show 
what the real situation was. 

In Mr. Justice McLennan's opinion, the 
Winner case does not support the con- 
tention that the interconnecting operation 
must be the main function of the under- 
taking to come within Section 92 (10) (a) 
of the B.N.A. Act. In his opinion, the 
inference from the Winner case seems to be 



161 



the other way; apart from a camouflaged 
local undertaking, the only question is 
whether there is one undertaking, and as a 
part of that undertaking, does the company 
carry goods beyond the province so as to 
connect Ontario and Quebec or extend 
beyond the limits of Ontario into the United 
States. 

In the Stevedores' case, the employees of 
the company at Toronto were exclusively 
engaged in loading and unloading ships 
operated on a regular schedule between 
ports in Canada and foreign ports. In this 
respect, the Supreme Court of Canada held 
that since the business of the company was 
stevedoring ships, operating as described, 
that business was an essential part of 
shipping either under Section 91 (10) "Navi- 
gation and Shipping" or within Section 
92 (10) (a) and (b) and, therefore, the 
labour relations between the company and 
its employees fell within the federal Indus- 
trial Relations and Disputes Investigation 
Act. 

In the case at bar, Counsel for the 
employee argued that the decision in the 
Stevedores' case was based on the fact that 
the employees were exclusively engaged in 
services forming an integral part of ship- 
ping, which is under federal jurisdiction, 
and that the result might well have been 
different had they been engaged partly in 
or substantially in local shipping in the 
same way as the employees in the case 
under review were substantially engaged 
in local transportation. In support of this 
argument. Counsel pointed out that several 
of the judgments in the Stevedores' case 
indicated that the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act would not apply 
to "local shipping." 

Mr. Justice McLennan did not agree with 
that argument. In his opinion, the judg- 
ments referred to discussed the validity of 
Section 53 (a) of the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act in its refer- 
ence to "inland shipping" and not the 
question of the applicability of the federal 
legislation to the stevedores. However, Mr. 
Justice McLennan agreed with the Counsel 
for the employee that the question may 
still be open as to which is the appropriate 
jurisdiction in a case involving stevedores 
engaged partly on foreign shipping and 
partly on local shipping where such steve- 
dores are employed, not by the shipping 
companies, but by an independent con- 
tractor. However, this uncertainty did not 



help the employee's counsel. It could only 
arise when the business and undertaking, 
while necessarily incidental to the operation 
of the steamships, was separated by a con- 
tract from the primary undertaking of 
shipping. In Mr. Justice McLennan's opinion, 
a more accurate analogy with the case at 
bar would be as to whether employees of 
a shipping company engaged partly in 
foreign and partly in local shipping were 
to be governed in their labour relations by 
the federal or provincial law. 

In the opinion of Mr. Justice McLennan, 
not every undertaking capable of connect- 
ing provinces or capable of extending 
beyond the limits of a province does so in 
fact. The words "connecting" and "extend- 
ing" used in Section 92 (10) (a) of the 
B.N.A. Act must be given some significance. 
For example, a trucking company or a 
taxicab company taking goods or passengers 
occasionally and at irregular intervals from 
one province to another could hardly be 
said to be an undertaking falling within 
Section 92 (10) (a). But, if the facts show 
that a particular undertaking involves "con- 
necting" and "extending" activity which is 
continuous and regular, as the undertaking 
is in the case under review, then it does in 
fact connect or extend and falls within 
Section 92 (10) (a) regardless of whether 
it is greater or less in etxent than that which 
is carried on within the province. 

Another point relied on by counsel for 
the employee was that in the case under 
review there was no question of national 
interest or concern involved and that under- 
takings, ■ in order to fall under Section 
92 (10) (a), must be of national importance 
or concern. Mr. Justice McLennan rejected 
this argument and was of the opinion that 
there is no requirement under Section 
92(10) (a) that the undertaking be of 
national importance or concern. 

In conclusion, the court held that the 
carrier's whole undertaking fell within Sec- 
tion 92 (10) (a) of the B.N.A. Act and the 
company's labour relations were subject to 
the federal Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act, and not to the Ontario 
Labour Relations Act. Consequently, an 
order was being issued prohibiting the 
Magistrates in Toronto from conducting any 
proceedings against the company under 
Section 32 (4) of the Ontario Labour Rela- 
tions Act. Re Tank Truck Transport Ltd. 
(1960), 25 D.L.R. (2d), Part 3, p. 161. 



162 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

Ontario amends apprenticeship regulations for the motor vehicle repair trade. 
Newfoundland adopts CSA Electrical Code as regulations under Fire Prevention Act 



In Ontario, amendments to the regulations 
for the motor vehicle repair trade established 
a term of apprenticeship of five years for 
the motor mechanic branch and of four 
years for the body repair, and electrical and 
fuel system repair branches of the trade. 

Newfoundland has adopted the seventh 
edition of the Canadian Electrical Code, 
Part I, (C.S.A. C22. 1-1958) as regulations 
under the Fire Prevention Act, 1954. 

British Columbi=i Health Act 

British Columbia amended the regulations 
for the sanitary control of industrial camps, 
issued under the Health Act. The new 
regulation, B.C. Reg. 247/60, gazetted 
December 29, amends B.C. Reg. 152/59. 

Formerly, the Minister of Health and 
Welfare v/as empowered to exempt for any 
specified period mobile camps or any speci- 
fied camp or place from the application of 
the regulations. This authority no longer 
exists. 

A trailer used as sleeping quarters for 
two persons must have a net floor area of 
at least 96 square feet and a cubic air space 
of not less than 768 cubic feet. For each 
additional person, it must have an additional 
floor area of at least 48 square feet and an 
additional cubic space of not less than 336 
cubic feet. 

British Columbia Hours of Work Act 

The British Columbia Board of Industrial 
Relations granted its usual Christmas exemp- 
tion to the mercantile trade. An order 
gazetted December 1 (B.C. Reg. 217/60) 
permitted employees in retail stores to work 
two hours in excess of the daily limit on 
any two days during the two-week period 
ending December 24, 1960. 

Ontario Workmen's Compensation Act 

Regulations made by the Ontario Work- 
men's Compensation Board amending the 
Schedule of Industries under the collective 
liability section of the Act, approved by 
O. Reg. 309/60, were gazetted December 3 
and went into force January 1. ^ 

Among other changes, cross cutting and 
drifting in or for mines, the manufacturing 
of metal pipe and metal tube, operating 
automotive machine shops and the blending 
or packaging of tea were added to the list of 
industries in which employers are required 
to contribute to the accident fund. 



There were also some changes in classes 
and some industries previously listed were 
redefined. 

Manitoba Mines Act 

Manitoba has issued Reg. 66/60 under 
the Mines Act, amending Reg. 57/45. The 
amendment was gazetted December 24. 

It provides that no person may use an 
explosive other than a Fume Class 1 explo- 
sive underground in a mine, except with the 
permission of the director. This type of 
explosive is defined as one that has been so 
classified by the Explosives Division of the 
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys. 

Ontario Apprenticeship Act 

The Ontario Industry and Labour Board 
and the Provincial Advisory Committee 
have amended their regulations respecting 
the motor vehicle repair trade. The pro- 
visions in the general apprenticeship regula- 
tions relating to wages of apprentices in the 
motor vehicle repair trade were also 
amended to conform with these changes. 
The new regulations were gazetted Decem- 
ber 24 as O. Reg. 326 to 328/60. 

The motor vehicle repair trade is now 
composd of three branches instead of four. 
The branches, lettered A, B and C, are 
the trades of motor mechanic, body repairer, 
and electrical and fuel system repairer. The 
previous regulations provided for a fourth 
branch, that of metal worker. 

There has been no change in the opera- 
tions that may be performed by persons 
engaged in any of the three branches of the 
trade except that testing for and correcting 
faulty alignment of wheels, axles and steer- 
ing mechanisms are no longer included 
among the duties of a body repairer. 

The regulations continue to exclude per- 
sons who do minor repair or servicing jobs, 
specifically exempting some employees not 
previously listed. These include persons en- 
gaged in balancing wheels and tires, lubri- 
cating the front wheel bearings and drive 
shaft, replacing mufilers, tail pipes and 
exhaust pipes. Persons who install defrosting 
apparatus are no longer included among 
the exemptions. 

There has been no change in the outline 
of the course of study required to be 
covered. The specifications for the trade of 
motor mechanic are in line with the national 
standards that have been developed. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



163 



In the motor mechanic trade, the term 
of apprenticeship remains five years but in 
the body repair and electrical and fuel 
system repair trades it is now four years 
instead of five. (The three-month proba- 
tionary period provided in the Act is in- 
cluded in all oases.) 

An exception is again made for persons 
with vocational training. In the motor 
mechanic and electrical and fuel system 
repair trades, the apprenticeship period is 
three years if the apprentice holds a second- 
ary school graduation diploma for auto 
mechanics (general). In the body repair 
trade, the term may also be reduced to 
three years if the apprentice holds a second- 
ary school graduation diploma in body 
repair. 

The provision regarding final examina- 
tions has been amended to conform with 
this change. Apprentices in the motor 
mechanics branch will continue to try their 
final examinations in the fifth year but those 
in the other two branches will be examined 
in the fourth year of their apprenticeship. 

Rates of wages are again established for 
apprentices in the motor vehicle repair 
trade. In the motor mechanics branch, the 
minimum payable to an apprentice is 50 per 
cent of a journeyman's wage during the 
first year, increasing by 10 per cent each 
year to a minimum of 90 per cent during 
the fifth year. An apprentice who has quali- 
fied for a three-year apprenticeship must 
now be paid at least 70 per cent of a 
journeyman's rate the first year, 80 per cent 
the second year and 90 per cent in the final 
year. In the other two branches of the 
trade, where the term of apprenticeship is 
now four years, the rates are 50, 60, 70 
and 80 per cent, respectively. Where the 
term of apprenticeship has been reduced to 
three years, the minimum is 60 per cent 
the first year, 70 the second year and 80 the 
last year. Previously, the minimum ranged 
from 40 to 80 per cent in the three branches 
of the trade. For apprentices serving a three- 
year term, the minimum ranged from 60 to 
80 per cent. 

As before, every person engaged in the 
motor vehicle repair trade except a regis- 
tered apprentice or a person employed for 



a probationary period must hold a certificate 
of qualification. A new provision permits 
an exception to be made in cases of emer- 
gency. A person who does not hold a cer- 
tificate of qualification and who normally 
does only minor repair and servicing jobs 
which do not come within the scope of the 
regulations may, in an emergency, do the 
work of a motor mechanic, body repairman 
or electrical and fuel system repairer, pro- 
vided no licensed tradesman is available. 

Newfoundland Fire Prevention Act, 1954 

Newfoundland has issued an order, gaz- 
etted December 6, adopting as regulations 
under the Fire Prevention Act, 1954, the 
Seventh Edition of the Canadian Electrical 
Code, Part 1, designated as C.S.A. C22.1- 
1958. 

Quebec Electricians' and Electrical Installations 
Act 

In Quebec, O.C 2289 was issued under 
the Electricians' and Electrical Installations 
Act, and gazetted December 31. It amends 
O.C. 2780, gazetted August 3, 1940, as 
amended. 

The amendment provides mainly for in- 
creased fees, but also deals with some other 
matters. The former provision that no 
person over 27 years of age could register as 
an apprentice electrician has been deleted. 
The order also sets out in more detail 
the requirements for obtaining an electrical 
installation permit. In addition, it includes 
a specific provision authorizing the Board 
of Examiners of Electricians to refuse to 
issue a new permit to the holder of an 
"A", "A-2" or "B" licence who has neglected 
or refused to repair defects pointed out in 
previous installations. 

Saskatchewan Gas Inspection and Licensing Act 

In Saskatchewan, O.C. 2201/60, issued 
under the Gas Inspection and Licensing Act, 
was gazetted December 16. It amends O.C. 
2244/57. The amendment repeals the pro- 
visions which formerly required a bond of 
$2,000 to be furnished by supply houses, 
and also by employers engaging staff to take 
charge of gas installations on their own 
premises. 



A law recently passed by Delaware, with penalties for violation, prohibits discrimina- 
tion in employment because of race, creed, colour, origin, and against workers aged 
45 to 65. 

A special division against discrimination was created in the state's Labor Commission 
to receive complaints and issue regulations under the new enactment. 

In 1960 also, Alaska, which has a Fair Employment Practices Act, passed a separate 
law covering older workers. 



164 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



Annual Report of U.K. Chief Inspector of Factories 



The number of reported accidents in 
premises under the United Kingdom Fac- 
tories Acts increased by 3.8 per cent from 
167,697 in 1958 to 174,071 in 1959, the 
Chief Inspector of Factories states in his 
Annual Report for 1959. An accident must 
be reported if it causes loss of life to a 
person employed in premises subject to the 
Factories Act or disables him for more 
than three days from earning full wages at 
the work at which he is employed. 

The number of fatal accidents, however, 
declined by 10 per cent from 665 to 598, 
the lowest number of fatalities in this 
century. 

The Chief Inspector attributes the increase 
in the total number of accidents partially 
to the marked rise in the level of industrial 
production in 1959 and the accompanying 
increase in the number of persons employed 
and hours worked. He does not consider 
that these reasons apply, however, to the 
disturbing increase, from 9,838 to 11,001, 
in the number of accidents to young persons. 

The Report incorporates a number of 
important changes in the analysis and classi- 
fication of accident statistics which should 
make them more effective for accident pre- 
vention purposes. A new table gives accident 
incidence rates for manufacturing industries. 

The Chief Inspector considers that the 
wearing of protective clothing would reduce 
the large number of accidents to the head 
and neck, eyes, feet and ankles, and hands. 

The final chapter of the Report concerns 
the activities of the Department. It includes 
information on publications and publicity; 
departmental, interdepartmental and joint 
committees; safety organizations; the Indus- 
trial Health and Safety Centre; and the 
Intelligence Section of the Inspectorate, 
which collects and disseminates information 
on industrial safety, health and welfare. 

This Report, as in 1957 and 1958, includes 
two chapters dealing with particular sub- 
jects. The subjects in the 1959 Report: the 
designing of machinery for safe operation, 
and the prevention of accidents to young 
persons. 

The Factories Act, 1959, was passed 
during the year (L.G. 1959, p. 1188). 

Accident Statistics and Trends 

At the end of 1959 there were 222,117 
registered factories, compared with 223,085 
at the end of 1958. This decline, a continua- 
tion of the trend since the war, occurred 
almost entirely in the number of factories 
without mechanical power. 

The increase in the number of accidents 
in 1959 reversed the consistent downward 



trend of the preceding three years, but the 
total is still the lowest for the ten-year 
period ending in 1959, with the exception 
of 1958. 

Although the number of fatal accidents 
has shown a marked decrease during the 
decade, the number of fatalities in building 
operations and works of engineering con- 
struction has fluctuated; in these industries, 
the substantial decline experienced in fac- 
tories, docks and warehouses has not been 
attained. 

The accident incidence rates table, incor- 
porated in the Report for the first time, 
shows the number of accidents in each 
manufacturing industry per 1,000 workers 
subject to the Factories Act. It will therefore 
be possible in future years to make year-to- 
year comparisons of accident incidence rates 
in individual manufacturing industries, tak- 
ing into account changes in the number of 
persons employed. 

The Report includes an appendix giving 
an analysis by process and cause of all 
reported accidents. A modified causation 
code for classifying reported accidents was 
introduced in 1959. This brings a more 
definite relationship between the cause of 
the accident and measures that might have 
prevented its occurrence. Comparison of 
figures in this appendix, however, can be 
made only with those for future years. 

The largest single category for factory 
accidents in 1959 was "handling goods"; 
26.2 per cent of the accidents were in this 
category. Other categories and the per- 
centage of accidents in them were: machin- 
ery in motion under power, 15.8; falls of 
persons, 15.1; struck by falling objects, 7.9; 
use of hand tools, 7.9; stepping on or 
striking against objects, 7.7; and transport 
other than rail, 6.1. 

An appendix to the Report analyses acci- 
dents in manufacturing by each industrial 
process, giving the nature and site of injury. 
This table, together with another one that 
analyses accidents by process and primary 
causation, permits an analysis of the causes 
and results of accidents in any manufactur- 
ing process. 

Accidents on building operations and 
works of engineering construction are 
analysed in much greater detail in this 
Report than previously. The number of 
accidents on building operations in 1959 
was 15,410, the highest total since the war. 
There were 169 fatal accidents, fewer than 
in 1958 and the average for the last ten 
yeais. The 2,875 reported accidents on 
works of engineering construction in 1959, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



165 



also the highest since the war, compares 
with 2,329 in 1958. Fatalities numbered 48, 
slightly lower than in 1958. 

Electrical accidents in 1959 numbered 
738, of which 34 were fatal, compared with 
714 accidents and 38 fatalities in 1958. (The 
causes and prevention of electrical accidents 
are discussed in detail in Electrical Acci- 
dents and their Causes 1959, another publi- 
cation of the Inspectorate.) 

Dangerous occurrences must be reported 
under the Factories Act, 1937. In 1959, 
there were 1,298 of them, compared with 
1,243 in 1958. 

Review of the Year 

This year the Report again deals with 
certain industrial developments relating to 
the safety, health and welfare of factory 
workers. It also refers to some of the efforts 
made in different industries, by voluntary 
organizations, and by schools and technical 
colleges in respect to problems of safety 
and health. 

With respect to electrical developments, 
there are discussions devoted to protection 
from fire and explosion in the petroleum 
industry, safety precautions in large am- 
monia compressor houses, and to electronics. 

Engineering developments dealt with in 
the Report concern the use of disc brakes 
on two-roll mills in rubber works, the 
introduction of power presses into the cloth- 
ing industry, the use of hydraulic power 
for leather machinery, and the use of 
automatic-feed mechanisms in the printing 
industry. 

In regard to foundry developments, the 
Report refers to a method of controlling 
fumes in non-ferrous foundries by the use 
of exhaust air of high velocity, and to a 
new type of reverberatory furnace. In iron 
foundries, work has been done on the 
drying of ladles by electrical energy and 
by gas. Two hot fettling processes have 
been introduced into steel foundries to mini- 
mize the production of dust containing 
dangerous free silica. There is also a dis- 
cussion involving power-operated doors on 
heavy duty lifts. 

Chemical developments included in the 
Report relate to the application of protec- 
tive coatings containing toxic solvents to 
the internal surfaces of vessels, and the use 
of ammonium nitrate in the manufacture of 
silica bricks of low porosity. 

In the building and civil engineering 
industries, developments in connection with 
maintenance and repair work on high build- 
ings and the risk of collision between jibs 
of tower cranes are discussed. 

Other developments dealt with concern 
the shipbuilding industry and the modifica- 
tion of textile machinery. 



Efforts were continued in 1959 to have 
instruction in safe working practices incor- 
porated in the curricula of technical col- 
leges and schools. In this respect, further 
discussions were held between Inspectors 
of Factories and of Schools and principals 
and teachers of technical colleges. 

During the year there was an extension of 
training courses in accident prevention for 
foremen and chargehands in the building 
industry. Similar courses have also been 
developed by the civil engineers for their 
foremen. 

Designing Machinery for Safe Operation 

The Report points out that many dangers 
of machinery can be avoided if the manu- 
facturer incorporates safety features when 
it is being designed. Since 1937 a provision 
in the Factories Act has required any per- 
son who sells a machine for use in a factory 
in the United Kingdom to meet certain 
minimum standards with respect to guard- 
ing, thus establishing the principle that the 
manufacturer of machinery as well as the 
user had a legal responsibility. A great 
deal has also been done on a voluntary 
basis, and the Inspectorate, manufacturers, 
users and unions have collaborated toward 
the designing of safe machinery. 

Agreement between employers and unions 
with respect to effective measures for 
machine guarding in a particular industry 
is one way of influencing machinery manu- 
facturers. Over the years, committees com- 
prised of representatives of these groups 
and the Inspectorate have made important 
contributions to the safe design of machin- 
ery in various industries, including the 
textile, printing and papermaking industries. 

Some types of machines, such as power 
presses and milling machines, are used in 
several industries. In these cases, technical 
advisory committees representatives of the 
principle makers and users have been estab- 
lished to deal with safety problems respect- 
ing their design. 

Another important agency contributing 
to machine safety is the British Standards 
Institution, which has as its main objective 
the co-ordination of the efforts of producers 
and users for the improvement, standardiza- 
tion and simplification of engineering and 
industrial products. Its standards bring to 
the attention of manufacturers important 
safety principles that should be incorporated 
in the design of machinery. Factory inspec- 
tors have served on about 400 of its com- 
mittees. 

The Report refers to five important 
general safety principles that manufacturers 
and designers should observe in connection 
with all types of machines. 



166 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 9 FEBRUARY 1967 



One of these principles is the importance 
of ensuring that the machine operator is 
safe during maintenance and cleaning of 
the machine, as well as when he is operating 
it. In this respect, safe methods of lubrica- 
tion can be designed, interlocking of guards 
may be employed, and "stop and lock" 
buttons may be used. 

The designer should try to eliminate 
dangerous moving parts of machinery, make 
them inaccessible or safe by position, or 
make it unnecessary for the operator to 
work in the danger area. The electric motor 
and the use of automatic-feed mechanisms 
for printing machines are examples where 
these principles have been applied. If com- 
plete enclosure or elimination of dangerous 
parts is impossible, the designer should try 
to achieve a built-in system of enclosures 
forming an integral part of the machine. 

Another important safety principle is that 
of "failure to safety." Measures should be 
taken so that if a machine breaks down or 
a safety device fails to function properly a 
dangerous situation will not arise. 

The provision of safe control devices is 
also a principle which the designer of a 
machine should observe. These should be so 
placed and arranged that they cannot be 
operated accidentally. The different kinds 
of control should be easily distinguishable. 
"Stop" buttons should stand out clearly, 
have a mushroom head, and be red. "Start" 
buttons should be sunk or shrouded to 
prevent accidental starting of the machine. 

In addition, the designer should so design 
a machine that unnecessary fatigue of the 
operator is eliminated, and thereby assist in 
avoiding accidents. 

Prevention of Accidents to Young Workers 

The Report states that young workers, 
especially during their first year of employ- 
ment, are more likely to have an accident 
than older, more experienced workers. Con- 
sequently, special safety measures for 
young workers should be promoted by the 
Government, colleges and schools, and em- 
ployers. 

Since 1937, legislation concerning young 
persons has been enacted which: prohibits 
or restricts employment in dangerous or 
unhealthy trades; prohibits employment on 
certain types of dangerous machinery and 
in carrying or lifting excessive weights; 
limits hours of work; and provides for 
medical supervision. 

The Chief Inspector considers that young 
persons in colleges and technical schools 
should receive safety training not as a 
special subject, but as an integral part of 
the courses normally taught. In this way, 
the young worker can learn how tools should 
be maintained and used, and machines 



properly guarded. The teacher can instil 
the safety consciousness and acceptance of 
discipline in the use of machines and tools 
that is very important in factory life. 

A number of conferences on safety train- 
ing in technical colleges and schools have 
been attended by principals, department 
heads and teachers, and addressed by senior 
members of the Factory Inspectorate. One 
of these conferences, held in Glasgow, 
favoured the following suggestions: the 
publication of a safety code for each col- 
lege; the appointment of one teacher to be 
specially responsible for safety matters; the 
inclusion of questions on safety in examina- 
tions; and close liaison between technical 
colleges and inspectors of factories, who 
can lecture and advise on safety. 

The Chief Inspector states that the em- 
ployer must take special safety precautions 
for young workers in his employ, and dis- 
cusses selection and supervision, and induc- 
tion and training as important measures in 
this respect. 

Care in selecting the young worker for a 
specific job is essential. Careful and constant 
supervision is necessary during the trial 
period. If he shows that he can not do the 
job safely he should be transferred. If a 
person is provisionally considered com- 
petent to do a job, there should be a check 
made for some time on his method and 
manner of working and on any accidents he 
may have. 

With respect to induction and training, 
all young workers, when first employed, 
should be instructed in safe working prac- 
tices and warned against behaviour that 
may cause accidents. They should be taught 
safety consciousness, and the dangers of, for 
example, loose clothing and footwear that 
does not protect the feet. 

In training schemes for young persons, 

(a) the young worker should be shown 
where he will work, the main dangers and 
their causes, and how to avoid them; 

(b) a competent adult should personally 
supervise the young person's work during 
initial training; 

(c) the proper way to operate his 
machine should be shown in deail, and the 
dangers of undesirable methods of operation 
explained; 

(d) there should be a clear policy for 
departmental managers and supervisors on 
accident prevention and close control of 
the work of young persons under their 
jurisdiction; 

(e) strict discipline should be enforced 
to ensure safe methods of working; 

(f) special safety propaganda should em- 
phasize the importance which the employer 
and supervisors attach to safety principles. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



167 



Annual Report on Industrial Health 



The Annual Report of the Chief Inspector 
of Factories on Industrial Health for 1959, 
published separately as in the two previous 
years, contains three main chapters. One 
of these reviews the year's developments; a 
second deals with industrial diseases, poison- 
ing and gassing; and the third is a special 
chapter on dusts and their effects on the 
lungs. 

Among the matters referred to in the 
first chapter is the publication of the Report 
of the Committee of Inquiry on Anthrax. 
This Committee was appointed by the 
Minister of Labour in 1957. Also, the Indus- 
trial Health Advisory Committee approved 
the publication of a booklet entitled Toxic 
Substances in Factory Atmospheres. It was 
published in 1960. 



The second chapter discusses specific cases 
of industrial diseases, poisoning and gassing, 
including their diagnosis, treatment, and 
measures taken to prevent their recurrence. 
These discussions relate to cases of lead 
poisoning, chronic benzene poisoning, com- 
pressed air illness, anthrax, chrome ulcera- 
tion, epitheliomatous ulceration, pneumo- 
coniosis, industrial dermatitis, over-exposure 
to ionizing radiations, and gassing. 

The special chapter deals with the effects 
of dust on the lungs, dusts causing fibrosis 
of the lungs, inert dusts which do not cause 
fibrosis of the lungs, dusts causing inflam- 
mation of the lungs, vegetable dusts, dusts 
predisposing to lung cancer, and protection 
against inhalation of dust. 



Labour Legislation of Past Decade 

{Continued from page 146) 

the provincial Acts. Compensation under 
the Act is paid by the employer (the ship- 
ping company), who is required to carry 
accident insurance to cover his liability. 

The 1953 amendments reduced the wait- 
ing period from seven to four days, in- 
creased the maximum annual earnings on 
which compensation is based from $2,500 
to $3,600 and raised the benefits payable 
in death cases. 

In 1957 maximum annual earnings were 
increased to $4,500, and the percentage of 
average earnings used in computing com- 
pensation for disability was raised from 
661 to 75. Further increases were provided 
in death benefits, making a widow eligible 
for an immediate lump sum of $200, a 
monthly pension of $75, and an allowance 
of $25 a month for each child under 18 
years. A payment of $35 a month was 
provided for an orphan child. A maximum 
of $200 is allowed for funeral expenses, 
together with a further sum, if required, 
for transportation of the body to the place 
of interment. 



The amendments made to the Govern- 
ment Employees Compensation Act involved 
no changes in benefits. Under this Act 
an employee of the Crown who is disabled 
by accident or industrial disease arising 
out of his employment is eligible for the 
benefits payable under the workmen's com- 
pensation law of the province in which 
he is usually employed. Provision for pay- 
ment of compensation in accordance with 
the Workmen's Compensation Act of the 
province where the employee is usually 
employed was made in 1955 amendments. 
Under the previous wording, compensation 
was paid according to the law of the pro- 
vince in which the accident occurred or the 
industrial disease was contracted. By a 
further amendment, the Minister of Labour 
was given authority to promote accident 
prevention programs in the Public Service 
of Canada. 

Claims under the Government Employees 
Compensation Act are adjudicated by the 
provincial Workmen's Compensation Board, 
which acts as the agent of the federal 
Government. 



168 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Claimants for unemployment insurance benefit at end of November number 485,200, 
Increase of 47 per cent over end of October total, of 16 per cent over figure 
year before, statistics* show. Men account for 85 per cent of month's increase 



Claimants t for unemployment insurance 
benefit on November 30 numbered 485,200, 
an increase of 47 per cent over the total 
of 330,200 on October 31, and 16 per cent 
higher than the figure of 417,500 on Novem- 
ber 30, 1959. 

Males accounted for more than 85 per 
cent of the increase during the month, and 
comprised 75 per cent of the total on 
November 30. 

Of the claimants at the end of November, 
some 15,000 were classified as seasonal 
benefit applicants, compared with a total 
of 5,000 seasonal claimants at the same time 
in 1959. 

The number of those on claim for two 
weeks or less increased by 81 per cent over 
October 31, the males in this category 
increasing by 91 per cent and the females 
by 49 per cent. 

The average period of time on claim on 
November 30 was estimated to have been a 
little more than seven weeks, compared with 
six and a half weeks at November 30, 1959. 

The number of those on claim for more 
than three months was substantially greater 
than at the same time in 1959, and this 
applied especially to males. 

Initial and Renewal Claims 

Initial and renewal claims for benefit 
during November numbered 304,400, which 
was 70 per cent more than the October 
total of 178,200 and about 10 per cent 
above the total of 278,600 in November 
1959. 

The month-to-month increase in initial 
claims was 100 per cent; renewal claims 
were up by 31 per cent. During the latter 
part of November, claims failing the regular 
contribution requirements are considered 

*See Tables E-1 to E-4 at back of this issue. 

t A claimant's unemployment register is placed in 
the "live file" at the local office as soon as the claim 
is forwarded for computation. As a result, the count 
of claimants at any given time inevitably includes 
some whose claims are in process. 



In a comparison of current employment 
statistics with those for a previous period, 
consideration should be given to relevant 
factors other than numbers, such as the 
opening and closing of seasonal industries, 
increase in area population, influence of 
weather conditions, and the general employ- 
ment situation. 

Claimants should not be interpreted either 
as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total 
job applicants". 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

92006-6—6 



• FEBRUARY 1961 



under the seasonal benefit provisions, al- 
though benefit may not be paid until the 
Monday of the week in which December 1 
falls. This explains, in part, the relatively 
larger increase in initial claims. 

Compared with the previous year's figures, 
renewal claims were 14 per cent higher. 
Initial claims increased by 7 per cent. 

The average weekly number of benefi- 
ciaries was estimated at 272,900 for Novem- 
ber, 225,900 for October and 209,600 for 
November 1959. 

Benefit payments totalled $26,600,000 for 
November, $20,700,000 for October and 
$17,500,000 for November 1959. 

The average weekly benefit payment was 
$23.19 in November, $22.86 in October, and 
$20.85 in November 1959. 

Insurance Registrations 

Reports received from local offices of the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission for 
November showed that insurance books or 
contribution cards had been issued to 
4,907,700 employees who had made con- 
tributions to the Unemployment Insurance 
Fund since April 1, 1960. 

At November 30, 1960 employers regis- 
tered numbered 332,001, a decrease of 148 
since October 31. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During November 1960, investigations 
conducted by enforcement officers across 
Canada numbered 6,162. Of these, 2,095 
were spot checks of postal and counter 

169 



claims to verify the fulfilment of statutory 
conditions and 231 were miscellaneous 
investigations. The remaining 3,836 were 
investigations in connection with claimants 
suspected of making false statements to 
obtain benefit. 

Prosecutions were begun in 305 cases, 48 
against employers and 257 against claim- 
ants.* Punitive disqualifications as a result 
of claimants' making false statements or 
misrepresentations numbered 3,599.* 



Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received in November totalled 
$29,214,672.56 compared with $30,246,- 
976.09 in October and $27,823,610.54 in 
November 1959. Benefits paid in November 
totalled $26,583,609.14 compared with $20,- 
650,922.40 in October and $17,479,376.35 in 
November 1959. 

The balance in the Fund on November 
30 was $331,703,558.88; on October 31 it 
was $329,072,495.46 and on November 30, 
1959, it was $475,178,655.52. 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB- 1792, November 8, 1960 

(Translation) 

Summary of the Main Facts — A married 
woman, 25 years of age, worked as a spinner 
for Bruck Mills Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que., 
from February 15 to April 11, 1960. When 
she filed an initial application for benefit 
on May 25, she stated that she had left 
that employment for the following reasons: 

I had to leave to take a rest on my doctor's 
orders. I am pregnant and am expecting the 
birth of a child around the end of October 
1960. I am prepared to work, but at a job 
where I can sit down. 

The employer stated that the claimant's 
employment had terminated owing to ill 
health. 

The claimant furnished the local office 
with a medical certificate dated May 25, 
which read: "The above-mentioned person, 
now under my care, can certainly return 
to work, provided it is work that can be 
done sitting down." 

On June 15, the insurance officer dis- 
qualified the claimant from receipt of benefit 
from May 22, because in his opinion she 
was not available for work within the mean- 
ing of section 54 (2) (a) of the Act. 

On June 17, the claimant appealed to the 
board of referees from the insurance offi- 
cer's decision. On July 27, the board of 
referees unanimously gave a decision, in 
part as follows: 

... In her statement to the board of referees, 
the claimant said that the work she was doing 
was too hard for her to do in her physical 
condition. She asked her employer for a lighter 
job and as all the jobs were filled she was 
forced to leave her employment. . 

The board of referees is of the opinion that 
the work performed by the claimant was cer- 
tainly too hard for her in her condition. The 
board of referees doubts very much whether an 

♦These do not necessarily relate to the investiga- 
tions conducted during this period. 



employer would be interested in hiring her in 
her condition. Furthermore, the claimant is 
not supporting a family. 

The board of referees, after studying the 
record, can only maintain the decision of the 
insurance officer. 

On August 9, with leave from the chair- 
man of the board of referees, the claimant 
appealed to the Umpire in the following 
terms: 

1. I have never refused employment; 

2. There has never been any doubt about my 
desire to obtain a job; 

3. There is a contradiction in the reasons, 
since they doubt whether an employer would 
be willing to hire me in my condition; 

4. If there is any doubt that an employer 
would be willing to hire me it is evident that 
I am available for work and that I have always 
wanted to obtain work. 

Considerations and Conclusions: Accord- 
ing to the evidence, the claimant, who at 
that time had been pregnant 2i months, 
left her employment as a spinner to take a 
rest, and her employer stated that the 
employment had terminated owing to ill 
health. This differs greatly from the reason 
which she gave before the board of referees, 
namely: "She asked her employer for a 
lighter job and as all the jobs were filled 
she was forced to leave her employment." 

I prefer to believe her first version, which 
she is supported, moreover, by the statement 
of the employer and by her withdrawal from 
the labour market for more than six weeks 
after the termination of her employment. 

The termination of the claimant's em- 
ployment in order to take a rest makes 
it very doubtful whether she really intended 
to work when she filed her application for 
benefit at the local office, especially if we 
consider also that she was registered only 
for work that could be done sitting dov!^n 
and that, as she had been pregnant for 
about four months, she could expect at the 
very rnost to obtain temporary jobs of short 
duration in that kind of work. 



170 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



In view of the serious doubt which 
attaches to the claimant's intention to work 
and the conditions of a particularly restric- 
tive nature on which she intended to re-enter 
the labour market, I consider that for all 
practical purposes the claimant was not 
available within the meaning of section 
54 (2) (a) of the Act, commencing May 22, 
1960. 

I therefore decide to dismiss the claimant's 
appeal. 

Decision CUB- 1800, December 7, 1960 

Summary of the Main Facts — ^The claim- 
ant, who resides in London, Ont., filed a 
renewal application for benefit on May 3, 
1960, and was registered for employment as 
a cafeteria worker. She stated that she had 
worked ... as a cafeteria worker from July 
1959 to April 28, 1960, when she was laid 
off because of a shortage of work. Her rate 
of pay at the time of the termination of 
her employment was $155 a month. 

The employer gave as the reason for 
separation "disagreement with supervisor. 
(The claimant) was not asked to leave." 

On May 10, the local office asked the 
claimant to comment on the reason given 
by the employer. She stated, in part, in a 
letter dated May 12: "... Re Disagreement 
with Supervisor . . . His general attitude I 
thought most unfair a number of times and 
felt quite justified in quitting . . ." 

The insurance officer disqualified the 
claimant from receipt of benefit for the 
period May 1, 1960, to June 4, 1960, inclu- 
sive, because, in his opinion, she had 
voluntarily left her employment without just 
cause (section 60 (1) of the Act). 

The claimant appealed to a board of 
referees and stated: 

... I feel justified under the conditions in 
leaving my last employment. Being placed in 
charge, as supervisor of the female staff on the 
morning shift (no less vi^ork) (no more money). 
Found this added responsibility "tough" due 
to lack of co-operation or support of senior 
supervisors. "Asked to be relieved from this 
responsibility". However, continued under these 
conditions, until I found it too difficult to 
carry on . . . 

The board of referees which heard the 
case in London, Ont., on June 16, by a 
majority decision dismissed the claimant's 
appeal. In reaching this decision, the major- 
ity members took cognizance of the fol- 
lowing: 

. . . (The) Manager, Food Services of (the 
employer), advised the local office today that 
she was not employed in a supervisory capa- 
city — she was a senior employee on the shift. 
He strongly indicated that she has stirred up 
considerable trouble during her period of 
employment and voluntarily separated on her 
own accord . . . 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

92006-G— G^ 



• FEBRUARY 7967 



The dissenting member of the board was 
of the opinion that the claimant was fully 
justified in leaving her employment "before 
a health condition appeared" as a conse- 
quence of her not being relieved of the 
supervisory part of her job. 

The claimant appealed to the Umpire 
on the same grounds as those contained in 
her appeal to the board of referees. In view 
of the claimant's appeal to the Umpire, the 
manager of the local office wrote to the 
employer on July 7 for information as to 
whether or not any change had been made 
in the claimant's duties, what work she 
was performing, details regarding the dis- 
agreement with the supervisor and whether 
or not the claimant attempted to have her 
alleged grievance rectified. (The employer) 
replied as follows: 

An attempt to answer your letter of July 7 
at this time is rather difficult as (the) Super- 
visor ... is on vacation. 

(The claimant) was engaged by us as a 
Cafeteria Assistant, and during the time that 
she was employed . . . there was no official 
change made in her status. Any thought that 
she was a supervisor was entirely in her own 
mind. As far as we are concerned any Em- 
ployee who shows qualities of Leadership would 
be encouraged by us and eventually we would 
promote them. 

Unfortunately (the claimant) possessed the 
unhappy faculty of fostering trouble among the 
people with whom she worked and also for 
herself. Any problem that existed with (the 
claimant) while employed . . . was not taken up 
by her with me. 

It is my understanding that on the day (the 
claimant) left, she approached her Supervisor 
regarding a decision on a problem, and as he 
was busy with other duties at the time attempted 
to delay the matter, whereupon (the claimant) 
made the abrupt comment — "Make up your 
mind" and walked off the job. 

I hope this letter is of some help to you 
in clearing up this matter, also it is not my 
wish to in any way hinder (the claimant), as 
her work was excellent, her manner was 
something else. 

The claimant also requested and was 
granted an oral hearing of her case before 
the Umpire, which was to be held in 
Toronto on November 24. However, prior to 
that date, the claimant withdrew her request 
for a hearing because of the expense she 
would have to bear by attending the hearing 
and as a consequence it was not held. 

Considerations and Conclusions — Under 
section 60 (1) of the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act, "an insured person is disqualified 
from receiving benefit if he . . . voluntarily 
left his employment without just cause." 

In this case, as the record shows that the 
claimant voluntarily quit her employment 
because of some dissatisfaction with her 
conditions of employment, in order to show 
just cause she should have, according to the 

{Continued on page 177) 

171 



LABOUR CONDITIONS IN FEDERAL 
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS 



Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during December 
Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During December the Department of Labour prepared 179 wage schedules for 
inclusion in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Government 
and its Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, 
remodelling, repair or demolition. In the same period, a total of 230 contracts in these 
categories was awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to 
trade unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of 
the contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under the heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practice; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in December for the manufacture of supplies and equipment 
were as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Defence Production 116 $696,322.00 

Post Office 7 87,122.00 

RCMP 11 28,368.74 



The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour These wage schedules are thereupon in- 
legislation of the federal Government has eluded with other relevant labour condi- 
the purpose of insuring that all Government tions as terms of such contracts to be 
contracts for works of construction and for observed by the contractors, 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment Wage schedules are not included in con- 
contain provisions to secure the payment of tracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
wages generally accepted as fair and reason- equipment because it is not possible to 
able in each trade or classification employed determine in advance the classification to 
in the district where the work is being per- be employed in the execution of a contract, 
formed. A statement of the labour conditions which 

The practice of Government departments must be observed in every such contract 

and those Crown corporations to which the is however, included therein and is of the 

legislation applies, before entering into con- same nature and effect as those which apply 

tracts for any work of construction, re- in works of construction, 
modelling, repair or demolition, is to obtain Copies of the federal Government's Fair 

wage schedules from the Department of Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 

Labour showing the applicable wage rate may be had upon request to the Industrial 

for each classification of workmen deemed Relations Branch of the Department of 

to be required in the execution of the work. Labour, Ottawa. 



172 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equip- 
ment provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate; but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

(b) the working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, 
or if there be no such custom, then fair and reasonable hours; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made during December 

During December the sum of $14,253.91 was collected from 9 contractors for wage 
arrears due their employees arising out of the failure of the contractors, or their sub- 
contractors, to apply the wage rates and other conditions of employment required by the 
schedule of labour conditions forming part of their contract. This amount is for distribution 
to the 313 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded during December 

(The labour conditions of the contracts marked (*) contain the General Fair Wages 
Clause providing for the observance of current or fair and reasonable rates of wages and 
hours of labour not in excess of eight per day and 44 per week, and also empower the 
Minister of Labour to deal with any question which may arise with regard thereto.) 

Department of Agriculture 

Fredericton N B: Wendell McFadzen, relocation of house No. 69, Experimental 
Station. Elbow Sask: Nick Linden Construction (Medicine Hat) Ltd, supply of gravel 
type material & depositing same in stockpile & on No. 19 Highway from its junction 
with No 42 Highway. Outlook Sask: W F Botkin Construction Ltd, supply & stockpiling of 
gravel type material on No 45 Highway from Birsey to South Saskatchewan River Damsite. 
near Castor Alta: Filipenko & Sons, construction of revisions & improvements to Parr 
Reservoir, near Hillspring Alta: Emil Anderson Construction Co Ltd, Square M Construc- 
tion Ltd, Coleman Collieries Ltd, construction of earth embankment to form Waterton 
Dam & upper portion of reinforced concrete access shaft for diversion tunnel on 
Waterton River. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Chalk River Ont: J A McGregor (Renfrew) Ltd, *plastering of ceiling & walls, 
addition to Bldg 150; Carl J Lehman & Sons Ltd, *extension to Bldg 100, Plant Site. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

St John's Nfld: Benson Builders Ltd, *repairs to prefabricated units (Vets 1/49). 
Gagetown N B: Forbes & Sloat Ltd, construction of additional access roads & house walks 
(Job 69/54). London Ont: Max A Crump, site improvement & planting for 100 housing 
units (FP 4/57). Trenton Ont: Tatham Co Ltd, construction of stage 4 extension to school 
(DND 7/60). 

Department of Citizensliip and Immigration 

Sioux Lookout Indian Agency Ont: James Ratchford Plumbing & Heating, improve- 
ment to washroom facilities, Sioux Lookout IRS. Six Nations Indian Agency Ont: Cayuga 
Quarries Ltd, construction of Boston Creek Bridge No 5 located on road No 273; Brenzil 
Construction Co, construction of Fish Creek Bridge No 3 located on road No 151. 
Clandeboye Indian Agency Man: F W Sawatzky Ltd, construction of one classroom 
prefabricated day school. Little Black River Reserve. Portage la Prairie Indian Agency 
Man: Relf Plumbing & Heating Ltd, conversion from coal to natural gas firing of 
boilers & furnace, Brandon IRS. Battleford Indian Agency Sask: Hahn Construction, 
construction of two classroom Indian Day school, Moosomin Reserve. Edmonton Indian 
Agency Alta: Hillas Electric Co, electrical re-wiring of Edmonton IRS. Kwawkewlth 
Indian Agency B C: K Moore & Co Ltd, construction of dormitory washrooms, etc. 
Alert Bay. Vancouver Indian Agency B C: Trysson & Son Iron Works, erection of fire 
escapes & building renovations, Sechelt IRS. Yukon Indian Agency Y T: Whitehorse 
Construction Co Ltd, installation of floor tile & linoleum, Carcross & Lower Post IRS. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 173 



Defence Construction (1951) Limited 

Torbay Nfld: Wm Lovelace Ltd, fire retardant coating, Bldg No 25 including leantos, 
RCAF Station. Chezzetcook N S: Vacon Construction Ltd, construction of control bldg, 
bombing range. Cornwallis N S: Cardinal Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, interior painting 
of 49 DND married quarters & 12 bldgs, HMCS Cornwallis. Dartmouth N S: L E Powell 
& Co Ltd, repairs to quay wall & wharf, RCN Armament Depot. Halifax N S: Dynamic 
Construction Ltd, construction of new sub-station. Gloucester Ont: L Zuccarini Con- 
struction, construction of maintenance workshop. Prince Albert Sask: T L Smith Con- 
struction Co Ltd, *supply & erection of extensions to existing Butler Bldg — DRB. Chilliwack 
B C: K Moore & Co Ltd, improvement to water distribution system. Camp. Esquimalt 

5 C; G H Wheaton Ltd, extension to Combined Technical Training Establishment. 

Building and Maintenance 

Camp Gagetown N B: E S Stephenson & Co Ltd, supply & installation of elevator 

6 erection of hoistway, CHP Bldg B-11. Longue Point Que: Daniels & Mannard Ltd, 
interior renovations to bldgs 143 & 145, No 25 COD. Barriefield Ont: Kingston Painting 
& Decorating Service, interior painting of 13 bldgs, RCEME School. Camp Borden Ont: 
F W Jackson & Sons Ltd, interior painting of bldg A 142, RCAF Station. Downsview Ont: 
E P Electric Products Co Ltd, installation of fire alarm system, RCAF Station. Winnipeg 
Man: Buhle Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, painting of 100 rental units, RCAF Station; 
Canadian Comstock Co Ltd, alterations to underground electrical distribution system. 

Department of Defence Production 

Summerside P E I: Maritime Asphalt Products Ltd, renovations to Barrack Blocks 
3, 4, 5 & 6. Albro Lake N S: Canadian Comstock Co Ltd, installation of underground 
power cable for Micro-wave Relay Station. Greenwood N S: Fred T Cleveland, interior 
painting of married quarters, RCAF Station. Halifax N S: Dominion Sound Equipment 
Ltd, installation of acoustic tile. Punch Card Machine Room, Bldg No D40A, HMC 
Dockyard; Webb Engineering Ltd, renewal of distribution line, HMC Dockyard. Sydney 
N S: Guildfords Ltd, machinery & pipe insulation, HMCS Lanark, Point Edward Naval 
Base. Quebec Que: Toitex Inc, replacement of galvanized roof covering, including insula- 
tion at 59-61 St Louis St PMQs. St Hubert Que: L Potvin Enrg, excavation & replacement 
of cables & potheads, RCAF Station. Angus Ont: Les Bertram & Sons, construction of 
sewage disposal field, 13X Depot, RCAF Station. Alexandria Ont: J L Lou Bray Ltd, 
removal of existing heating system & chimneys, etc. Armoury. Downsview Ont: Weather- 
proofing Ltd, replacement of pipe sleeves in all inlet entrances to manholes, RCAF Station. 
London Ont: Cardinal Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, painting interior of PMQs, Oxford 
& Highbury Ave; J V McDonnell Electrical Construction Co Ltd, installation of automatic 
fire detection system in No 5 Hangar, RCAF Depot. Fort Churchill Man: S E Gage Co 
Ltd, application of sprayed asbestos insulation to interior of RCE Garage, Bldg D-18. 
Shilo Man: Fort Rouge Decoration & Sandblasting Co, interior painting of bldgs LI 04 
& L67, Military Camp. Lancaster Park Alta: B & E Painting & Decorating Ltd, repainting 
interior of Bldg 222, RCAF Station, Namao. Whitehorse Y T: Nelson's Ltd, partial renewal 
of heating system in Bldg No 200, HQNWHS & OR's Quarters, Camp Takhini. 

Department of Justice 

St Vincent de Paul Que: Douglas Bremner Contractors & Builders Ltd, construction 
of Vocational Training Bldg No 20, Federal Training Centre. 

Department of Mines and Tecfinical Surveys 

Halifax N S: Halifax Shipyards, *docking & underwater repairs, CGS Baffin; Halifax 
Shipyards, * docking & underwater repairs, CGS Kapuskasing. Pictou N S: Ferguson Indus- 
tries Ltd, *docking & underwater repairs, CGS Cartier; Ferguson Industries Ltd, *docking 
& underwater repairs, CGS Acadia. Victoria B C: Yarrows Ltd, *docking & underwater 
repairs, CGS Marabelle; McKay-Cormack Ltd, *construction of echo sounding launch; 
Point Hope Shipyards Ltd, * docking & underwater repairs, CGS Parry; Yarrows Ltd, 
* docking & underwater repairs, CGS Wm J Stewart; McKay-Cormack Ltd, * annual refit 
of CGS Parry; McKay-Cormack Ltd, *annual refit of CGS Marabell. 

174 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



National Harbours Board 

Montreal Que: Forested Products Ltd, modifications to Marine Towers, Elevator 
No 1. 

Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources 

Baddeck N S: Alphonse MacPhee, *masonry construction for Silver Dart Memorial, 
Alexander Graham Bell Museum. Cape Breton Highlands National Park N S: Hopper 
Bros, *well drilling at Broad Cove Campground. Louisbourg N S: Mark Connington, 
*supply & installation of automatic stoker for Museum & Custodian's residence, Fortress 
of Louisbourg. Port Royal N S: H B Mitchell Ltd, *supply & installation of heating 
system for Port Royal Habitation. Fort Beausejour N B: Sackville Builders Ltd, construc- 
tion of addition to Custodian's residence. Fundy National Park N B: New Brunswick 
Electric Power Commission, * construction of transformer bank in trailer park. Saint John 
N B: Stirling Electric Ltd, ^electrical installation, Martello Tower; Harold Peer Ltd, 
♦installation of forced warm air heating system, Martello Tower. Great Whale River Que: 
Tyver Ltd, supply & installation of underground services. Quebec Que: Tri-Bec Inc, *supply 
& installation of floodlights for St John's Gate. Amherstburg Ont: Ranta Enterprises 
(Amherstburg) Ltd, *repairs to river frontage. Fort Maiden National Historic Park. 
Georgian Bay Islands National Park Ont: Ernie Bates, * electrification of equipment storage 
bldg & painting of storage & fire equipment sheds, Beausoleil Island. Point Pelee National 
Park Ont: Noble's Cartage, *supply & placing of rock rip-rap along shorelines. Riding 
Mountain National Park Man: Brandon Plumbing & Heating Ltd, *plumbing & heating 
installations in duplex residence. Prince Albert National Park Sask: Saskatchewan Power 
Corporation, *construction of 25 KV single phase line to pumphouse & heater house. 
Banff National Park Alta: Hodgett's Plastering Ltd, *lathing, plastering, etc in residence, 
Healey Creek Warden Station. Elk Island National Park Alta: International Water Supply 
Ltd, test drilling & drilling of four wells. Mount Revelstoke National Park B C: Astra 
Construction Co Ltd, reconstruction of access road from Mile 2 to Mile 8, inclusive. Yoho 
National Park B C: Don Young Plumbing & Heating, * supply & installation of heating 
system in Warden's residence, Leanchoil; Hodgett's Plastering Ltd, * lathing & plastering 
work in Warden's residence near Leanchoil. 

Department of Public Works 

Fortune Nfld: McNamara Construction of Newfoundland Ltd, harbour improvements. 
Sweet Bay Nfld: Benson Builders Ltd, construction of landing wharf. Charlottetown P E I: 
Berken Painting Co, interior painting & redecorating of Dominion Bldg. Tignish Harbour 
P E I: Ralph Ford, breakwater replacement. West Arichat N S: Albert MacDonald, wharf 
construction. Lord's Cove N B: Diamond Construction (1955) Ltd, wharf repairs. Lorne- 
ville N B: Robert Lloyd Galbraith, harbour improvements. Middle Caraquet N B: Comeau 
& Savoie Construction Ltd, wharf repairs. New Mills N B: Comeau & Savoie Construction 
Ltd, wharf repairs. Caughnawaga Indian Agency Que: Simeon Marcil, construction of 
teachers' residence. Contrecoeur Que: Les Entreprises Sorel Enrg, repairs to retaining 
wall on lot P-99. Lauzon Que: Theriault & Beland Inc, replacement of cast iron bollards 
at Lome Dry Dock. Les Escoumains Que: Lucien Cote, Enr, construction of post office. 
Mistassini Que: Verga Construction Ltee, construction of post office. Montreal Que: 
J Lamontagne Ltee, construction of despatching platform, first floor. Postal Terminal, 715 
Windsor St; Edgar Milot Inc, interior alterations (new office accommodation), Customs 
House; B K Johl Inc, installation of metal office partitioning. National Revenue Bldg; 
Daniels & Mannard Ltd, alterations to Youville Postal Station. Ormstown Que: Simeon 
Marcil, construction of post office. Quebec Que: C Jobin Ltee, alterations to screen line 
& night lobby at Upper Town post office. Rimouski Que: Leopold Tremblay, repairs to 
lighting system. St Francois du Lac Que: Roy & Trottier Inc, reconstruction of retaining 
wall. St Germain de Grantham Que: Robert Lemire, construction of post office. St Lin 
(Laurentides) Que: Sauve Construction Ltee, construction of post office. Three Rivers Que: 
Lajeunesse & Freres Inc, interior painting of federal bldg. Thurso Que: Dufort & Lavoie 
Enrg, addition & alterations, federal bldg. Angus Ont: J M Fuller Ltd, construction of post 
office. Downsview Ont: Purton Construction Co Ltd, erection of federal bldg. Dundas Ont: 
Frank Owens, repairs to federal bldg. Falconbridge Ont: Fielding Construction (Sudbury) 
Ltd, construction of post office. Finch Ont: Menard Bros Ltd, construction of post office. 
Ingersoll Ont: Ellis-Don Ltd, construction of federal bldg. Kenora Ont: S Flostrand, subway 
wharf repairs. New Hamburg Ont: L Riehl & Son, construction of post office. North Bay 
Ont: Gap Construction Co Ltd, wharf improvements. Ottawa Ont: Sanco Ltd, cleaning 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 175 



interior of new Surveys & Mapping Bldg, Booth St; A G Reed, installation of lighting 
system at Plouffe Park, Preston St; Oakes Mechanical Contracting Co, installation of 
cooling towers. Food & Drug Laboratory & Standards Testing Laboratory, Tunney's Pasture; 
Earle K Midkiff, redecoration of interior, No 2 Temporary Bldg, Wellington St; Presley 
Painting & Decorating Co Ltd, redecoration of Food & Drug Bldg, Tunney's Pasture; 
Hill the Mover, moving of furniture, equipment, etc, from post office workshops. Sparks 
& Elgin Sts 310-312 Slater St, & Woods Bldg, Hull, Que, to new post office bldg. Riverside 
Drive. Port Arthur-Fort William Ont: McNamara Construction Ltd, harbour improvements, 
stage 5 (structures). Port Carting Ont: Norman Young & Sons, construction of post office. 
Swastika Ont: Pulsifer Construction Ltd, construction of post office. Thorndale Ont: Frank 
Van Bussel & Sons Ltd, construction of post office. Toronto Ont: Canadian Dredge & 
Dock Co Ltd, reconstruction of West Pier (South End), Eastern Entrance of Harbour. 
Churchill Man: Matheson Bros Ltd, construction of water supply sewage collection & 
disposal facilities for Eskimo Camp 20. Rapid City Man: Jaska Construction Ltd, con- 
struction of post office. Winnipeg Man: J S Quinn Construction Co Ltd, wharf repairs 
(Alexander Ave wharf). Fillmore Sask: Weyburn Builders & Supplies Ltd, construction 
of post office. St Brieux Sask: C M Miners Construction Co Ltd, construction of post 
office. Calmar Alta: Gustav A Larson, construction of post office. Empress Aha: Greene 
Construction Co, construction of post office. Rocky ford Alta: Bird Construction Co Ltd, 
construction of post office. Tofield Alta: H D C Construction Co Ltd, construction of 
post office. Wildwood Alta: Gustav A Larson, construction of post office. Alert Bay B C: 
Walden Bros Sawmills Ltd, float renewal. Departure Bay B C: Hume & Rumble Ltd, 
installation of electrical distribution system (Nanaimo Biological Station). Douglas B C: 
H Jones & Son, construction of inspection station, parking facilities & landscaping. Customs 
& Immigration Bldg. Field B C: Universal Construction Co Ltd, construction of post 
office. Gibson's Landing B C: Pacific Piledriving Co Ltd, wharf repairs. Lund B C: 
Greenlees Piledriving Co Ltd, float renewal. Nanaimo B C: The Eraser River Pile Driving 
Co Ltd, reconstruction of Assembly Wharf. Oliver B C: Pollock & Taylor Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of federal bldg. Parksville B C: G E Millhouse Construction Co 
Ltd, construction of post office. Steveston B C: Seaforth Construction Ltd, reconstruction 
of boat house. Vananda B C: W J Dick Ltd, construction of post office. Vancouver B C: 
Kennett Construction Ltd, alterations to fourth floor of Old Examining Warehouse. 
Victoria B C: Ove Pedersen, alterations & additions to third floor, federal bldg. 

Contracts Contaiiimg the General Fair Wages Clause 

Halifax N S: James F Lahey Ltd, interior painting, federal bldg. Little River N S: 
Shelburne Contracting Ltd, dredging. Pictou N S: Kipling MacKenzie,, interior painting, 
federal bldg. Shelburne N S: Shelburne Contracting Ltd, interior painting, federal bldg. 
Sydney N S: Maritime Builders Ltd, repairs to ceiling, UIC Bldg, St Andrews N B: 
Delbert Rigby, general alterations to federal bldg. Amos Que: H O Perron, plaster 
repairs & painting, federal bldg. Arvida Que: Adelard Drolet, interior painting, federal bldg. 
Dolbeau Que: Ange-Emil Boivin, supply & installation of lock boxes, federal bldg. 
Hull Que: W Sparks & Son Ltd, moving furniture from Connor Bldg to PWD Stores; 
Louis G Fortin, erection of chain link fence. Federal Match Bldg. Longueuil Que: Paul 
Carriere, general alterations to federal bldg. Louiseville Que: Bernard Loranger, interior 
painting, federal bldg. Mont-Joli Que: Marc-Aurele Morissette, interior repainting, federal 
bldg. Montreal Que: Baillie Mcintosh, alterations to National Revenue Bldg; Jos Dufour, 
plaster repairs & painting. Postal Station "C"; Harmony Painting & Decorating, plaster 
repairs & painting. Postal Terminal; Canadian-Fairbanks-Morse Co Ltd, supply & installa- 
tion of air compressor, National Film Board. St Hyacinthe Que: Paul Brodeur, demolition 
of Lorette Convent. St Roch Que: Tremblay & Freres Ltd, interior repainting, federal 
bldg. St Sauveur Que: Adrien Hebert Ltd, basement repairs, federal bldg. Shawville Que: 
Percy Belsher, construction of screenline & installation of lock boxes, federal bldg. 
Thetford Mines Que: Marius Rouleau, interior repainting, federal bldg. Atikokan Ont: 
Alex Zoldy, general repairs to Post Office. Gore Bay Ont: Lawrence Clarke, repairs & 
interior painting, federal bldg. Hamilton Ont: John Kenyon, interior painting. National 
Revenue Bldg. Moosonee Ont: Pulsifer Construction Ltd, construction of screenline & 
installation of lock boxes, federal bldg. Ottawa Ont: A Bruce Benson Ltd, construction 
of foundation for parapet wall, Tunney's Pasture; Hugh H Grant Ltd, demolition of 
bldg at Tunney's Pasture; Unicrete Co Ltd, general alterations to "C" Bldg, Cartier 
Square; H R Hills, general alterations, Royal Canadian Mint; Rene Cleroux, installation 
of steam heaters, plastic greenhouses, Experimental Farm; J R Statham Construction Ltd, 
general repairs to pumphouse. Experimental Farm; F J Esson Co Ltd, renewal of 

176 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



concrete walks, RCMP HQ, Overbrook; S Morin, redecorating 92 rooms, No 5 Temporary 
Bldg; Aerodyne Ltd, installation of exhaust systems, Plouffe Park Bldg; A Lanctot Ltd, 
general alterations to Norlite Bldg; Jas Patterson & Sons, construction of counters in 
Sir Charles Tupper Bldg; R & R Construction, general redecoration. Plaza Bldg; Stradwick 
Tile & Flooring, floor repairs. No 3 Temporary Bldg; R & R Construction, general altera- 
tions to No 4 Temporary Bldg. South Porcupine Out: Aldo Varono, alterations to federal 
bldg. Walkerville Ont: T Drew, interior painting, federal bldg. Windsor Ont: Herbert Winch 
& Son, various repairs to UIC Bldg. Winnipeg Man: Otis Elevator Co Ltd, elevator repairs, 
federal bldg; Kummen Shipman Electric Co, elevator repairs, federal bldg. Regina Sask: 
Johnny's Painting & Decorating, interior painting. Post Office. Edmonton Alta: MacCosham 
Van Lines Ltd, moving furniture from leased bldgs to UIC Bldg. Princeton B C: Stan 
Mills, general repairs & painting, federal bldg. New Westminster B C: F V Moberg, 
redecoration of Indian & Fisheries Bldg. Sydney B C: Island Craft Woodworkers, redecora- 
tion of federal bldg. Vancouver B C: C J Seamer & Sons, general repairs & painting, 
Mariners' Clinic; McKenzie Barge & Marine Ways Ltd, overhaul of Snagboat Samson V. 
Victoria B C: J J Roos & Son, interior painting, Observatory. Whitehorse Y T: Territorial 
Construction, carpentry repairs to Northern housing. 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 

Beauharnois Que: Defresne Engineering Co Ltd, construction of steel sheet pile 
closure wall, upper south entrance wall. Upper Beauharnois Lock. Port Weller & Thorold 
Que: Moir Construction Co Ltd, construction of entrance wall fenders. Locks 1, 4, 6 & 7, 
Welland Canal. St Catharines Ont: Niagara Structural Steel Painting, painting structural 
steel & metal work of lock gates exterior, Welland Canal; Russel-Hipwell Engines Ltd, 
supply & installation of standby diesel engines for vertical lift bridges, Welland Canal. 
St Catharines, Thorold & Merritton Ont: McLean-Peister Ltd, seeding, sodding & 
Shriner's culvert connection. Second Welland Canal. Sault Ste Marie Ont: S D Adams 
Welded Products Ltd, supply & installation of steel machinery hood covers for motor 
houses, Sault Ste Marie Canal. 

Department ot Transport 

Charlottetown P E I: M F Schurman Co Ltd, installation of water supply system, 
Airport. Halifax N S: A S Wheaton, improvements in terminal area, International Airport; 
Steen Mechanical Contractors Ltd, installation of underground steam distribution system, 
International Airport. Moncton N B: Nordbec Construction Inc, construction of instrument 
landing system (ILS). Seven Islands, Natashquan, Port Menier (Anticosti Island) Que & 
Shippegan Island N B: The Tower Co Ltd, construction of Decca navigation chain 
installations. Sorel Que: Marine Industries Ltd, *general repairs & conversion of DOT 
79 for service as Class 1 dry cargo vessel; Marine Industries Ltd, *general repairs & 
conversion of DOT 80 for service as Class 1 dry cargo vessel, near Valleyfield Que: 
Trudeau & Fils Ltee, replacement of bridges No 3, 4 & 5 on Soulanges Canal by gravel 
fill. Erieau Ont: Erieau Shipbuilding & Drydock Co Ltd, *construction of steel workboat. 
Midland Bay Ont: Waubaushene Navigation Ltd, *removal of wrecks along shore. Nine 
Mile Point Ont: Fort Construction & Equipment Ltd, construction of two single dwellings, 
drilling of two wells & installation of pumps & waterlines & demolition of old dwelling. 
North Bay Ont: Conbrad Ltd, trenching for cables for AASR. Point Petre Ont: Fort 
Construction & Equipment Ltd, construction of single dwelling. Uplands Ont: Universal 
Electric, rehabilitation of low & high intensity approach lights to Runway 32, Airport 
Prince Rupert B C: F B Stewart & Co Ltd, installation of airport lighting facilities. 



Decisions of Umpire 

{Continued from page 171) 

established jurisprudence, adduced evidence As no such evidence is contained in the 

to prove that her grievance was a reasonable record, she has failed to show just cause 

one under the circumstances, and that she for her action. 

had taken all the available means of having I consequently decide to dismiss her 

the grievance remedied. appeal. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 177 

92006-6—7 



PRICES AND THE COST OF LIVING 



Consumer Price Index, January 1961 

The consumer price index (1949 = 100) 
declined 0.3 per cent from 129.6 to 129.2 
between December 1960 and January 1961. 
A year ago the index was 127.5.* 

The decrease was largely the result of 
a 0.7-per-cent drop in the food index, 
combined with declines in the clothing 
index and the household operation index 
of 0.9 per cent and 0.2 per cent, respec- 
tively. The other commodities and services 
index was unchanged and the shelter index 
rose a fractional 0.1 per cent. 

The food index moved from 125.3 to 
124.4 as egg and fresh tomato prices were 
substantially lower and price declines were 
reported also for citrus fruits, bananas and 
canned tomatoes. Prices were higher for 
most other fresh fruits and vegetables, and 
meats. 

The slight rise in the shelter index from 
144.6 to 144.7 reflected similar movements 
in both the rent and home-ownership com- 
ponents. 

The drop in the clothing index from 112.6 
to 111.6 reflected widespread January sales 
affecting, in particular, men's overcoats, 
women's fur and cloth coats, boys' parkas, 
and girls' winter coats and cotton dresses. 

The household operation index declined 
from 123.5 to 123.3 as- household appliance 
prices continued to move downward. Sale 
prices were still a factor in prices of fur- 
niture and textiles, but prices of floor 
coverings and household supplies and serv- 
ices were at higher levels. 

The other commodities and services index 
was unchanged at 138.3 as slightly lower 
prices for new passenger cars balanced 
minor increases for some personal care and 
recreation items. 

Group indexes one year earlier (January 
1960) were: food 121.6, shelter 142.8, cloth- 
ing 110.2, household operation 123.3, and 
other commodities and services 136.9. 

City Consumer Price Indexes, December 1960 

Consumer price indexes (1949=100) 
declined in five of ten regional cities between 
November and December, t Decreases rang- 
ed from 0.1 per cent to 0.3 per cent. 
Indexes were higher in three of the five 
other regional cities and unchanged in the 
remaining two. 

*See Table F-1 at back of book. 
tSee Table F-2 at back of book. 



Food indexes declined in seven of the 
ten regional cities and were higher in the 
remaining three cities. Shelter indexes 
showed mixed results: four indexes were 
higher, two lower and four unchanged. 
Clothing indexes were higher in five regional 
cities, unchanged in four cities and down 
fractionally in the remaining city. House- 
hold operation indexes were higher in six 
of ten regional cities, unchanged in two 
and down in the other two cities. Other 
commodities and services indexes were un- 
changed in seven of ten regional cities, 
up fractionally in two cities and down 
slightly in the remaining city. 

Regional consumer price index point 
changes between November and December 
were as follows: Edmonton-Calgary —0.4 
to 125.3; Ottawa —0.1 to 130.1; Toronto 
—0.1 to 131.8; Saskatoon-Regina —0.1 to 
125.4; Vancouver —0.1 to 130.7; St. John's 
+ 0.4 to 116.3*. Saint John +0.3 to 130.3; 
Winnipeg +0.1 to 127.8. Halifax and Mont- 
real remained unchanged at 128.4 and 129.7 
respectively. 

Wholesale Price Index, December 1960 

Canada's general wholesale price index 
(1935-39 = 100) for December 1960 reached 
230.1, up 0.2 per cent from the November 
1960 figure of 229.7. 

The index stood at 229.7 in December 
1959. 

Three major group indexes moved higher 
between November and December, four 
were lower, and the non-ferrous metals 
group index was unchanged at 174.9. 

The animal products group index rose 
1.9 per cent from 251.1 to 255.8, and was 
the chief cause for the rise in the general 
index. The non-metallic minerals group 
index edged up slightly from 184.9 to 
185.1, and the chemical products group 
index from 187.8 to 188.0. 

The vegetable products group index de- 
clined 0.4 per cent from 199.6 to 198.7, 
the wood products group index edged down 
from 300.7 to 300.2, the iron products 
group index from 255.2 to 254.6, and the 
textile products group index from 229.8 to 
229.6. 

Wholesale Price Index, November 1960 

Canada's general wholesale price index 
(1935-39=100) in November 1960 was 



*0n base June 1951=100. 



178 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 



Index 1949=100 



Index 1949=100 



t 




' 


I 
1 


1 




1 
! 
1 




SHELTER 


^ 


















...>•"""' 




















..^-"^^ER COMMODITIES 
: AND SERVICES ...- 


••^"^ 


\, i ■ 


u^ 


/J:::^'i\ 1 \^ 








u. -rr 


^.,: -^ 


^ 


FOOD 

1 1 




/^^' 


.--• -^ 


**v^ 








, ..1 .•\,.>.-../> 


A 


#' 






—•— --li- 


CLOTHING 1 


HOUSEHOLD OPERATION 


1 I 


] 


! 




MJ 


1 

i 



150 



140 



130 



120 



110 



100 



-H 150 



140 



130 



120 



110 



90 



1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 
Yearly Average Monthly Indexes 



229.7, down 0.3 per cent from the October 
index of 230.3 and down 0.2 per cent from 
the 1959 November figure of 230.2. 

Four of the eight major group indexes 
declined in November and three were higher. 
The chemical products group index was 
unchanged at 187.8. 

The vegetable products group index re- 
corded the largest decrease, 0.9 per cent, 
declining from 201.5 to 199.6. The wood 
products group index fell 0.4 per cent from 
301.8 to 300.7; the non-ferrous metals 
group index 0.3 per cent from 175.5 to 
174.9. The iron products group index eased 
off from 255.6 to 255.2. 

The textile products group index rose 0.3 
per cent from 229.2 to 229.8, and the non- 
metallic minerals group index also increased 
0.3 per cent from 184.3 to 184.9. The animal 



products group index edged up from 251.0 
to 251.1. 

U.S. Consumer Price Index, December 1960 

The United States consumer price index 
(1947-49=100) rose to a record in Decem- 
ber for the fourth consecutive month. 
Higher food and housing costs pushed the 
index up from 127.4 in mid-November 
1960 to 127.5 in mid-December 1960. It 
was the 17th advance in the past 21 months. 

U.K. Index of Retail Prices, November 1960 

The United Kingdom index of retail 
prices (Jan. 17, 1956=100) rose 0.5 per 
cent from 111.4 to 111.9 between mid- 
October and mid-November 1960. This 
brought the index exactly two full points 
above the January 1960 index of 109.9. 



Report of Board 

{Continued from page 157) 

(b) From the date of the signing of the 
next agreement (and taking into con- 
sideration the reduction of the regu- 
lar work week from 48 to 44 hours): 
$1.13^x48 

=$1.26 plus $0.05=$1.31 

44 

(c) From six (6) months after the signing 
of the next agreement: $1.36 



The Board recommends that the parties 
conclude an agreement which will last one 
(1) year from the date on which it is 
signed, 

HULL, December 8, 1960. 

{Sgd.) Jean Girouard, 
Chairman. 
{Sgd.) Jacques Bertrand, 
Member. 
(Sgd.) Jean-Robert Gauthier, 
Member. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

92006-6— 7i 



• FEBRUARY 7961 



179 



Publications Recently Received 

In Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not for 
sale by the Department of Labour. Persons 
wishing to purchase them should com- 
municate with the publishers. Publications 
listed may be borrowed by making applica- 
tion to the Librarian, Department of Labour, 
Ottawa. Students must apply through the 
library of their institution. Applications for 
loans should give the number (numeral) of 
the publication desired and the month in 
which it was listed in the Labour Gazette. 

List No. 148 

Accident Prevention 

1. PREsroENT's Conference on Occupa- 
tional Safety. 7th, Washington, D.C, 
1960. Proceedings, March 1-3, 1960. Wash- 
ington. U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of 
Labor Standards, 1960. Pp. 269. 

2. U.S. Bureau of Labor Standards. 
Mechanical Handling of Materials. Washing- 
ton, GPO, 1960. Pp. 29. 

"Safety in Industry; Mechanical and Phy- 
sical Hazards No. 2." 

Annual Reports 

3. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Economics and Research Branch. Work- 
ing Conditions in Canadian Industry, 1959. 
Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1960. Pp. 78. 

4. Great Britain. Advisory Council on 
Scientific Policy. Annual Report, 1959- 
1960. London, HMSO, 1960. Pp. 32. 

5. Newfoundland. Workmen's Compen- 
sation Board. Annual Report, 1959. St. 
John's 1960. Pp. 44. 

6. United Nations. Economic and 
Social Council. Report, 1 August 1959-5 
August 1960. New York, United Nations, 
1960. Pp. 91. 

7. U.S. Bureau of Labor Standards. 
Annual Digest of State and Federal Labor 
Legislation, 1959. Washington, GPO, 1960. 
Pp. 184. 

Automation 

8. American Management Association. 
Data Processing today, a Progress Report; 
New Concepts, Techniques, and Applica- 
tions. New York, cl960. Pp. 143. 

Contains articles on management and data 
processing, advances in data-processing tech- 
nology, six case studies of electronic computer 
applications in various industries, and, infor- 
mation processing in the Chrysler Corporation. 

9. Welford, Alan Traviss. Ergonomics 
of Automation. London, HMSO, 1960. Pp. 
60. 

This booklet is about the designing of auto- 
matic equipment and the human problems 
likely to arise from automation. 



Canada at Worl( Broadcasts 

The following four talks were given in 
1960 and published by the Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour in Ottawa. 

10. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Home and Farm Improvement Loans, by 
F. F. Field, H. J. MacBurney, and G. G. 
Blackburn. Pp. 5. 

In these interviews, F. F. Field, Director of 
the Information Division of the Central Mort- 
gage and Housing Corporation discussed the 
Home Improvement Loan Plan under the 
National Housing Act, and H. J. MacBurney, 
Supervisor of the Farm Improvement Loans 
Division of the Department of Finance spoke 
about the Farm Improvement Loan Plan under 
the Farm Improvement Loans Act. 

11. Drinkwater, William S. "The 
Labour Gazette". Pp. 5. 

The present Editor of the Labour Gazette, 
on the occasion of its 60th Anniversary, tells 
something about its history and its contents. 

12. McCallum, Frank. Winter Employ- 
ment. Pp. 4. 

The speaker, chairman of the National Em- 
ployment Committee, spoke in connection with 
the "Do It Now" campaigns to provide winter 
employment. 

13. Starr, Michael. Winter Employment. 
Pp. 4. 

The Federal Minister of Labour discussed 
the "Do It Now" campaigns. 

Industrial Relations 

14. Elkouri, Frank. How Arbitration 
works, by Frank Elkouri and Edna Elkouri. 
Rev. [i.e. 2d] ed. Washington, Bureau of 
National Affairs, 1960. Pp. 498. 

Partial Contents: Arbitration and its Setting. 
Legal Status of Arbitration. Grievances — Pre- 
lude to Arbitration. Arbitration Procedures and 
Techniques. Evidence. Management Rights. 
Seniority. Discharge and Discipline. 

15. Horowitz, Morris Aaron. The New 
York Hotel Industry; a Labor Relations 
Study. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Univer- 
sity Press, 1960. Pp. 265. 

"The focus of this study is the relationship 
between the Hotel Association of New York 
City and the New York Hotel Trades Council, 
and its results." 

International Labour Organization 

16. International Labour Office. Acci- 
dent Prevention in Mines Other than Coal 
Mines. Second item on the agenda. Geneva, 
1957. Pp. 102. 

At head of title: Report 2. International 
Labour Organization. Tripartite Technical 
Meeting on Mines Other Than Coal Mines, 
Geneva, 1957. 

17. International Labour Office. Ef- 
fects of Technological Developments on 



180 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



Wages and on Conditions and Level of 
Employment in the Textile Industry. Third 
item on the agenda. Geneva, 1958. Pp. 167. 
At head of title: Report 3. International 
Labour Organization. Textiles Committee. 
6th sess., 1958. 

18. International Labour Office. Gen- 
eral Examination of the Social Problems 
arising in Mines Other than Coal Mines. 
General Report. First item on the agenda. 
Geneva, 1957. Pp. 176. 

At head of title: Report 1. International 
Labour Organization. Tripartite Technical 
Meeting for Mines Other Than Coal Mines. 
Geneva, 1957. 

19. International Labor Office. Gen- 
eral Report [for the Textiles Committee] 
First item on the agenda. Geneva, 1958. 
2 parts. 

At head of title: Report 1, item 1 (a) and 
(b) [and 1 (c)] International Labour Or- 
ganization. Textiles Committee. 6th sess., 
1958. 

Contents: [1] Effect given to the Conclu- 
sions of the Previous Sessions. [2] Recent 
Events and Developments in the Textile Indus- 
try. 

20. International Labour Office. In- 
dustrial Relations in Mines Other than Coal 
Mines. Fourth item on the agenda. Geneva, 
1957. Pp. 40. 

At head of title: Report 4. International 
Labour Organization. Tripartite Technical 
Meeting for Mines Other Than Coal Mines. 
Geneva, 1957. 

21. International Labour Office. Re- 
port of the Director-General [to the African 
Regional Conference] First item on the 
agenda. Geneva, 1960. Pp. 90. 

At head of title: Report L International 
Labour Organization. 1st African Regional 
Conference, 1960. 

22. International Labour Office. 
Working Conditions in the Textile Industry. 
Second item on the agenda. Geneva, 1958. 
Pp. 51. 

At head of title: Report 2. International 
Labour Organization. Textile Committee. 
6th sess., 1958. 

Labour Organization 

23. Karnik, V. B. Communist Ministry 
and Trade Unions in Kerala; Impact of the 
Communist Ministry on the Trade Union 
Movement in Kerala. New Delhi, Interna- 
tional Confederation of Free Trade Unions, 
Asian Regional Organization, 1959. Pp. 61. 

"... A short report on the impact of the 
Communist Ministry in Kerala [India] on the 
trade union movement in the State." The Com- 
munist Party took office in Kerala on April 1, 
1957. The non-Communist trade unions helped 
to unseat the Communist Government in July 
1959. 



24. Warmington, W. A. A West African 
Trade Union; a Case Study of the Came- 
roons Development Corporation Workers' 
Union and its Relations with the Employers. 
London, Published for the Nigerian Institute 
of Social and Economic Research by Oxford 
University Press, 1960. Pp. 150. 

Looks into the development of a Nigerian 
trade union (one of the largest in British West 
Africa) up to the end of 1956; outlines its 
development; examines its administration and 
its relations with the employer; and discusses 
the impact of the union on its membership. 

Labour Supply 

25. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Economics and Research Branch. Trends 
in the Agricultural Labour Force in Canada 
from 1921 to 1959. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 
1960. Pp. 69. 

Contents: The Agricultural Labour Force. 
Characteristics of the Agricultural Labour 
Force. Seasonality of Employment in Agricul- 
ture. Conditions of Employment in Agriculture. 
Trends and Characteristics of the Farm Popu- 
lation Other Trends in the Agricultural Indus- 
try. Conclusions 

26. U.S. Employment Service. District 
OF Columbia. Outlook for Professional, 
Scientific and Technical Personnel in the 
Nation's Capital. A Report on Estimated 
Employment in 79 Selected Professional, 
Scientific and Technical Occupations in the 
Washington Metropolitan Area, December 
1957; and Employment Prospects in the 
Metropolitan Area and in These Selected 
Occupations for 1962. Washington, GPO, 
1960. Pp. 88. 

Labouring Classes 

27. European Economic Community. 
Commission. Expose sur la situation sociale 
dans la Communaute, a V entree en vigueur 
du Traite instituant la Communaute econo- 
mique europeenne. [Luxembourg? Service 
des publications des communautes euro- 
peennes] 1958. Pp. 129. 

"Le present expose est joint au rapport gene- 
ral soumis par la Commission a lAssemblee 
parlementaire europeenne a sa session ordinaire 
d'octobre 1958." 

28. Harrison, Martin. Trade Unions and 
the Labour Party since 1945. London, Allen 
& Unwin, 1960. Pp. 360. 

An examination of the alliance between the 
trade union members and the purely political 
members of the Labour Party shows that there 
is some incompatibility in the relationship. 

29. International Labour Office. Why 
Labour leaves the Land; a Comparative 
Study of the Movement of Labour out of 
Agriculture. Geneva, 1960. Pp. 229. 

"The object of this study is to consider the 
causes of the movement of labour out of 
agriculture into other occupations, the prob- 
lems which arise from it, and the policies which 
have been adopted to deal with these prob- 
lems." 



THf LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



181 



30. Ontario. Operating Engineering 
Board. Operating Engineers Handbook. Rev. 
ed. Toronto, Ontario Dept. of Labour, 1960. 
Pp. 104. 

Contains information about the Operating 
Engineer's Act of Ontario; explains how exam- 
inations and the issuance of certificates have 
contributed to the safety and efficiency of the 
operation of power plants; tells how to become 
an operating engineer, experience needed, etc. 

31. Parmer, Jess Norman. Colonial 
Labor Policy and Administration: a History 
of Labor in the Rubber Plantation Industry 
in Malaya, cl 9 10-1 941. Locust Valley, N.Y., 
Published for the Association for Asian 
Studies by J. J. Augustin, 1960. Pp. 294. 

"The object of this study is to set out and 
evaluate colonial labor policy in the rubber 
plantation industry; to find the sources of 
policy; to study the relations between govern- 
ment officials and rubber planting employers 
as they concerned labor and to indicate briefly 
some of the effects of British labor policy and 
administration in Malaya." 

32. Paterson, John F. Silicosis in Hard- 
rock Miners in Ontario. Toronto, Queen's 
Printer, 1959. Pp. 47. 

33. U.S. Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training. Employee Training in New Jer- 
sey Industry; a Study of Efforts to improve 
the Job Skill and Technical Knowledge of 
Workers in New Jersey Establishments with 
Four or More Employees. Washington, 
GPO, 1960. Pp. 46. 

34. U.S. Department of Labor. The 
American Workers' Fact Book. 2d ed. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 355, 40. 

Some of the many topics discussed in this 
book are the labour force, productivity, wages 
and hours, industrial safety, workmen's com- 
pensation, labour legislation, collective bargain- 
ing, and labour unions. An appendix provides 
information on the functions of the Department 
of Labor and its branches. 

Unemployment 

35. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Economics and Research Branch. Seasonal 
Unemployment in Canada. Ottawa, Queen's 
Printer, 1960. Pp. 32. 

Deals with ". . . some of the economic prob- 
lems associated with seasonal unemployment, 
with the extent of seasonal variations in employ- 
ment and unemployment in Canada and its five 
regions, with the characteristics of the season- 
ally unemployed workers, some of the steps 
taken to reduce their numbers, and some of 
the problems associated with finding a long-term 
solution to seasonal unemployment." 

36. U.S. Congress. House. Committee 
on Banking and Currency. Legislation to 
relieve Unemployment. Hearings before the 
Committee on Banking and Currency, House 
of Representatives, Eighty-fifth Congress, 
Second Session on Community Facilities, 
Area Redevelopment, and Small-Business 
Financing Bills . . . Washington, GPO, 1958. 
Pp. 1349. 



Hearings held April 14-May 22, 1958. 

A number of State Governors, Members of 
the House of Representatives, Mayors, and 
others presented views and suggestions on the 
unemployment situation in the U.S. Among 
those presenting statements was former Presi- 
dent Harry S. Truman. 

Wages and Hours 

37. Robertson, Donald J. Factory Wage 
Structures and National Agreements. Cam- 
bridge [Eng.] University Press, 1960. Pp. 
260. 

"This is a survey of the structure of factory 
wages in Great Britain. Three case-studies from 
engineering and shipbuilding lead into a general 
discussion of wage structures in these indus- 
tries. The author considers the uses and abuses 
of systems of payment by results, and parti- 
cularly their effects on relative payments to 
different grades of workers. Overtime payments 
are similarly considered, especially their attrac- 
tion to workers and their cost to managements. 
Finally, the effects of these components of the 
pay packet are discussed in relation to the 
attitudes of trade unions and managements, and 
to wage policies and theories." 

38. U.S. Department of Labour. Wage 
AND Hour and Public Contracts Divi- 
sions. Report submitted to the Congress in 
Accordance with the Requirements of Sec- 
tion 4 (d) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, 
1958. Washington, 1959. 5 Volumes in 1. 

Contents: (1) Administration of the Fair 
Labor Standards and Public Contracts Act, 
Fiscal Year 1958. (2) Studies of the Economic 
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage. Effects in 
Selected Low Wage Industries and Localities. 
(3) Studies of the Economic Effects of the $1 
Minimum Wage; Interim Report. (4) Factory 
Workers' Earnings, May 1958. Distribution of 
Production Workers in Manufacturing Indus- 
tries by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings. (5) 
Earnings in Wholesale Trade, June 1958. 

Women 

39. Joint ICFTU/ITS Consultative 
Committee for Women Workers' Ques- 
tions. Enquiry into the Status of the 
Woman Worker Organization. Brussels, In- 
ternational Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions, 1958. Pp. 25. 

40. National Conference of Labour 
Women. Report of the Thirty-seventh Na- 
tional Conference of Labour Women . . . 
Southsea, April 5, 6 and 7, 1960. London, 
Labour Party, 1960. Pp. 50. 

41. National Council of Women of 
Canada. Year Book, 1960. [Ottawa] 1960. 
Pp. 160. 

42. Sengupta, Padmini (Sathianadhan). 
Women Workers of India. New York, Asia 
Publishing House, 1960. Pp. 296. 

Miscellaneous 

43. Canada. Bureau of Statistics. Sur- 
vey of Adult Education, 1957/58. Ottawa, 
Queen's Printer, 1960. Pp. 71. 



182 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



Page 

Tables A-1 to A-2— Labour Force 183 

Table B-1— Labour Income 184 

Tables C-1 to C-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 185 

Tables D-1 to D-5— Employment Service Statistics 189 

Tables E-1 to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance 195 

Tables F-1 and F-2— Prices 198 

Tables G-1 to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts 199 



A — Labour Force 

TABLE A-1— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 12, 1960 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 





Canada 


Atlantic 
Region 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Region 


British 
Columbia 


The Labour Force 


6.458 

4,748 
1,710 

607 

795 

2,971 

1,856 

229 

6,029 

4,385 
1,644 

649 
5,380 

4,924 

3,439 
1,485 

429 

363 
66 

5,420 
1,171 
4,249 


583 

442 
141 

64 
80 
242 
171 
26 

530 

392 
138 

53 

477 

432 

309 
123 

53 

50 

611 
154 
457 


1.807 

1,350 
457 

212 
258 
827 
461 
49 

1,664 

1,229 
435 

128 
1,536 

1,398 

1,000 
398 

143 

121 
22 

1,561 
313 

1,248 


2,384 

1,699 
685 

191 

261 

1,128 

716 

88 

2,257 

1,595 

662 

178 
2,079 

1,925 

1.322 
603 

127 

104 
23 

1,795 

365 

1,430 


1,101 

821 
280 

101 
132 
495 
327 
46 

1,052 

781 
271 

261 
791 

723 

488 
235 

49 

40 

* 

930 
212 
718 


583 


Men 


436 


Women 


147 


14 — 19 years 


39 


20 — 24 years 


64 


25 — 44 years 


279 


45—64 years 


181 


65 years and. over . . . . 


20 


Employed 


526 


Men 


388 




138 




29 


Non-Agricultural 


497 


Paid Workers 


446 


Men 


320 




126 


Unemployed .... 


57 


Men 


48 


Women 


* 


Persons Not in the Labour Force 


523 


Men 


127 




396 







Less than 10,000. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



18$ 



TABLE A-2— UNEMPLOYED 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



November 
1960 



October 



November 
1959 



Total Unemployed 

On Temporary layoff up to 30 days 
Without work and seeking work — 

Seeking full-time work 

Seeking part-time work 

Seeking under 1 month 

Seeking 1 — 3 months 

Seeking 4 — 6 months 

Seeking more than 6 months. . . 



429 

28 
401 

380 
21 

127 
158 
62 
54 



368 

21 
347 

332 
15 

120 
125 
53 
49 



317 

21 
296 

280 
16 

129 
104 
32 
31 



B — Labour Income 

Note: The estimates of labour income in this table have been revised in accordance with recent revisions to the 
National Accounts. Note particularly the use of annual totals instead of monthly averajies, and the introduction of 
quarterly instead of monthly totals for some industries. Monthly and quarterly figures mayjnot add to annual totals 
because of rounding. 

TABLE B-1— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Totals 


Quarterly Totals> 




Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation, 

Storage 

and 

Communi- 

cation2 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
Utilities 


Trade 


Finance 
Services 
(includ- 
ing 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
Income 


Totals^ 


195.5— Total. . . . 
1956— Total. . . . 
1957— Total.... 
1958— Total. . . . 
1959-Total. . . . 

1959— Nov 

Dec. 


432 
498 
535 
526 
552 

47.1 
46.1 

46.0 
46.7 
46.7 
44.7 
45.2 
46.8 
46.4 
46.7 
47.0 
45.8 
45.4 


4,148 
4,586 
4.805 
4,745 
5.018 

421.0 
419.9 

418.8 
418.8 
421.2 
422.9 
429.7 
434.8 
429.6 
430.3 
434.3 
429.9 
425.3 


1,396 
1,560 
1.658 
1.664 
1,756 

148.0 
142.5 

140.3 
141.3 
138.7 
145. 
147.9 
150.7 
153.6 
152.9 
151.6 
149.6 
147.0 


329 
371 
336 
271 
288 

94.2 


925 
1.210 
1.316 
1.336 
1.463 

371.4 


204 
239 
363 
285 
302 

77.4 


1,870 
2,069 
2,263 
2,356 
2,527 

661.0 


3,211 
3.546 
3.954 
4.334 
4,821 

1,230.1 


538 
617 
673 

717 
770 

197.3 


13,223 
14,890 
15 996 
16,434 
17.717 

1,510.8 
1,482.1 


1960— Jan. 














1,458.7 


Feb 

March... 


73.4 


296.5 


74.7 


634.7 


1,234.3 


204.4 


1,461.1 
1,462.6 


April 














1,486.9 


May 


71.7 


356.1 


77.7 


656.5 


1.297.1 


209.8 


1,532.6 
1,576.8 


July 














1,564.1 


Aue; 

Sept 

Oct.*.... 


88.4 


417. 6t 


81.lt 


663. 7t 


1.300.6t 


213. 9t 


1.574.5 
1.603.9 














1.582.5 


Nov.t . 














1,555.7 



















1 Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 

2 Includes post office wages and salaries. 

2 Figures in this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining columns 
of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. (See also headnote.) 
* Revised, 
t Preliminary. 



184 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



C — ^Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-1 to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees— at November, 1960 em- 
ployers in the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total employment of 3,810,150. Tables C-4 (every 
second month) and C-*) are based on reports from a somewhat smaller number of firms than Tables C-1 to C-3. 
They relate only to wage earners for whom statistics of hours of work are also available whereas Tables C-1 toIC-3 
relate to salaried employees as well as to all wage earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-1— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949 =100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 





Industrial Composite 


Manufacturing 




Index Numbers (1949 = 100)1 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Index Numbers (1949 = 100) 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Year and Month 


Employ- 
ment 


*Myrff 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
Payrolls 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Averages 

1955 


112.9 
.. 120.7 


161.2 
182.0 
194.7 
194.1 
205.7 

211.6 
200.0 

202.2 
202.0 
201.5 
204.1 
209.8 
217.7 
217.8 
219.0 
220.7 
218.2 
214.7 


142.1 
150.0 
158.1 
163.9 
171.0 

172.8 
168.6 

174.9 

175.4 
175.4 
176.9 
175.4 
176.1 
177.6 
176.8 
178.2 
178.3 
177.9 


$ 

61.05 
64.44 
67.93 
70.43 
73.47 

74.23 
72.41 

75.13 
75.35 

75.37 
75.98 
75.36 
75.67 
76.28 
75.94 
76.55 
76.60 
76.43 


109.8 
115.8 
115.8 
109.8 
111.1 

110.6 
108.4 

108.6 
108.9 
109.0 
108.8 
110.6 
112.1 
110.2 
111.7 
111.6 
109.6 
108.2 


159.5 
176.8 
185.3 
182.7 
193.3 

195.3 
187.1 

194.4 
194.4 
195.5 
196.3 
198.1 
201.8 
198.4 
199.7 
201.6 
199.4 
195.3 


144.4 
151.7 
159.1 
165.3 
172.5 

174.8 
170.9 

177.2 
176.6 

177.5 
178.5 
176.9 
177.8 
177.8 
176.5 
178.2 
179.6 
178.0 


S 
63.48 


1956 


66 71 


1957 


122.6 
117.9 
119.7 

121.8 
118.1 

115.1 
114.6 
114.2 
114.8 
118.9 
122.8 
121.9 
123.1 
123.1 
121.5 
119.8 


69.94 


1958 


72.67 


1959 


75.84 


1959 

November 


76.86 




75.14 


1960 


77,90 


February . . . 


77 68 


March 


78.04 


April 


78.48 


May 


77.80 


June . . 


78.16 


July 


78.18 


Aug. :::. 


77.62 


Sept 


78.37 


Oct.* 


78.95 


Nov.t 


78.28 







1 Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8)Finance. 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service, (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and 
recreational service). 

Technical Note — A change has been made in the method of dating the statistics published in Tables C-1 to C-6 to 
conform with the usual practice of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. In the past, statistics for the last pay period in 
a month were labelled "pay period preceding" the first day of the following month. From now on, statistics for the last 
pay period in a month will be labelled for that month. Another change is that average hourly earnings formerly expressed 
in cents carried to one decimal place, are now published in dollars and cents. 

* Revised. 

t Preliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



185 



TABLE C-2— AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 



Area 


Employment 
Index Numbers 


Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries, in Dollars 


Oct. 

1960 


Sept. 
I960 


Oct. 

1959 


Oct. 
1960 


Sept. 
1960 


Oct. 
1959 


Provinces 

Newfoundland 


148.1 
138.5 
95.6 
106.7 
123.4 
120.5 
114.4 
131.2 
155.0 
115.3 

niA 

140.2 

90.3 
118.5 
104.6 
103.7 
115.9 
111.4 

99.0 
105.7 
113.0 

78.5 
125.7 
126.1 
114.6 

92.1 
170.4 
131.8 
110.9 
109.1 
101.4 

80.4 
121.7 
117.5 
124.6 
148.7 

94.5 
126.6 
125.6 

75.4 
146.2 
114.8 
H4.2 
134.9 
144.3 
188.5 
173.7 
112.3 
109.7 


151.4 
144.8 
97.9 
108.1 
124.2 
121.8 
115.9 
134.0 
159.8 
118.9 

123.1 

143.8 

96.0 
117.9 
101.9 
107.0 
120.7 
112.6 
104.6 
109.9 
113.2 

78.4 
125.5 
127.0 
112.9 

93.6 
165.4 
131.4 
111.4 
111.6 
113.3 

79.3 
122.7 
119.7 
124.5 
147.8 

94.3 
126.4 
126.9 

76.4 
145.1 
115.4 
115.0 
135.6 
147.1 
192.1 
176.9 
115.0 
113.0 


141.5 
139.1 
100.2 
104.3 
124.1 
125.0 
116.4 
135.2 
160.3 
120.3 

134.4 

144.8 

93.1 
115.9 
105.0 
100.1 
117.2 
113.6 
103.5 
105.6 
122.7 

79.3 
127.5 
129.8 
111.5 
101.9 
178.7 
135.0 
116.3 
116.2 
101.8 

90.4 
129.1 
113.9 
127.1 
141.5 

96.6 
127.7 
128.3 

82.0 
155.3 
113.8 
115.6 
134.9 
145.5 
195.9 
176.5 
119.3 
115.8 


$ 

70.24 
54.77 
63.28 
62.45 
73.32 
79.78 
72.49 
73.92 
79.47 
84.26 

76.65 

55.93 
76.95 
62.18 
59.67 
61.54 
93.65 
64.09 
62.85 
83.02 
71.76 
60.85 
75.02 
71.82 
76.52 
84.31 
88.38 
79.84 
85.20 
85.70 
79.01 
72.73 
70.16 
69.03 
73.31 
89.59 
68.65 
73.22 
100.81 
85.75 
96.85 
81.50 
69.31 
71.49 
69.24 
74.27 
74.72 
82.03 
75.33 


$ 

69.41 
53.73 
63.33 
62.67 
73.71 
79.58 
72.76 
73.42 
78.18 
83.63 

76.55 

55.12 
76.71 
62.28 
60.41 
63.72 
95.62 
65.20 
64.04 
83.12 
72.69 
61.42 
75.32 
71.93 
74.92 
85.27 
90.14 
80.08 
85.06 
85.91 
76.38 
71.68 
71.35 
69.22 
72.01 
89.52 
68.93 
73.54 
99.61 
84.42 
95.49 
80.45 
69.31 
71.23 
68.76 
73.94 
74.34 
81.53 
74.45 


64.34 


Prince Edward Island 


55.20 


Nova Scotia 


61.69 


New Brunswick 


60.85 




71.81 


Ontario 


77.47 


Manitoba 


71.06 




71.54 


Alberta (including Northwest Territories) 


76.57 




82.35 


Canada 


74.66 


Urban Areas 

St. John's 


52.81 


Sydney 


75.52 


Halifax 


60.46 


Moncton 


57.91 


Saint John 


57.84 




88.67 


Quebec 


63.28 




60.14 


Shawinigan 


81.40 


Three Rivers 


68.41 




59.24 


Montreal 


73.54 


Ottawa— Hull 


68.65 




71.37 


Peterborough . 


83.99 


Oshawa 


85.18 


Toronto 


77.22 




83.63 


St. Catharines 


84.49 


Niagara Falls 


76.83 


Brantford 


70.54 


Guelph 


69.60 


Gait 


67.71 


Mitchener 


71.38 


Sudbury . ' 


87.28 




66.66 


London .... . . . 


70.77 




95.78 


Windsor 


86.65 


Sault ate. Marie 


96.32 


Ft. William— Pt. Arthur 


76.74 


Winnipeg . . . 


67.63 




67.75 


Saskatoon 


67.63 




71.45 


Calgary 


72.02 


Vancouver 


80.47 




72.49 







TABLE C-4— HOURS IN MANUFACTURING BY PROVINCES 

This table is published every second month. 



186 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 

Note: Information for other industries is given ia "Employment and Payrolls" 



Industry 



Employment 
Index Numbers 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries, in Dollars 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Iron 

Uranium , 

Fuels , 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas. 
Non-metal , 



Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables . 

Grain miU products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicles parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery 

Telecommunication equipment 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and drycleaning plants 

Industrial composite 



120.0 

135.1 

72.8 

193.1 

265.8 



48.1 
263.8 
142.6 

109.6 

110.4 
108.9 
120.0 
139.7 
129.8 
103.6 
112.6 
106.5 
80.0 
101.0 
84.0 
90.8 
77.4 



63.5 
83.7 
91.9 
91.4 
99.7 
76.6 
102.3 
102.3 
113.2 
81.2 
125.6 
126.4 
123.7 
125.1 
102.9 
56.7 
146.2 
98.3 
97.6 
89.4 
112.8 
116.4 
110.3 
113.4 
103.4 
248.8 
99.8 
100.2 



59.0 
116.9 
129.2 
147.0 
102.6 
150.6 
130.9 
101.9 
215.3 
141.7 

86.4 
152.5 
138.0 
141.1 
131.9 
116.6 
156.8 
134.6 

138.9 

135.3 



144. 
134. 

143. 

129. 
115. 

131. 



123.2 

138.0 

73.4 

198.1 

287.3 



91.9 

50.9 

268.3 

147.8 

111.6 

111.6 

111.7 

129.9 

139.4 

207.9 

105.0 

113.4 

105.3 

78.8 

102.7 

85.8 

93.5 

77.4 

67.7 

64.0 

83.9 

92.5 

92.2 

100.7 

75.7 

106.0 

107.3 

114.0 

84.6 

127.5 

128.9 

124.1 

124.5 

102.7 

53.5 

136.3 

98.5 

96.8 

89.9 

113.6 

117.3 

111.8 

115.8 

103.4 

244.7 

98.2 

100.6 

60.3 

119.8 

130.4 

146.7 

102.3 

153.5 

133.0 

103.9 

217.2 

144.3 

89.7 

151.7 

140.0 

143.1 

133.4 

116.6 

160.7 

132.8 

144.3 

139.5 
152.2 
135.1 

147.6 

135.0 
115 7 

123.1 



124.9 

141.7 

73.9 

204.9 

247.4 



94.7 

51.8 

279.6 

137.6 

113.9 

119.1 

109.6 

121.0 

144.8 

125.2 

104.7 

111.9 

113.5 

85.0 

109.9 

87.4 

92.4 

78.1 

65.5 

64.8 

84.1 

94.2 

94.5 

97.9 

80.0 

108.7 

109.8 

116.3 

88.8 

125.2 

125.8 

123.7 

124.0 

113.6 

78.8 

162.2 

102.9 

114.4 

102.9 

120.7 

126.0 

114.5 

121.5 

113.3 

250.3 

112.7 

109.6 

71.1 

124.3 

129.3 

149.8 

110.0 

144.7 

140.7 

114.4 

221.0 

149.6 

104.8 

152.8 

136.3 

138. 1 

131.6 

121.3 

148.7 

131.5 

146.5 

146.2 
147.0 
132.7 

141.5 

129.0 
114.1 

134.4 



% 
93.97 

95.17 
76.33 
101.80 
114.32 
110.63 
95.71 
74.62 
112.28 
85.65 

78.95 

85.24 
73.61 
68.72 
77.87 
54.92 
77.99 
66.30 
96.19 
77.88 
80.49 
52.64 
49.16 
63.16 
59.06 
59.68 
69.37 
49.92 
48.18 
50.87 
50.37 
69.45 
71.72 
67.39 
61.38 
93.55 

101.06 
75.48 
85.36 
89.59 
89.69 
86.34 
79.83 
78.51 
85.18 
86.83 

103.96 
87.65 
88.79 
89.38 
94.80 
99.63 
85.74 
80.76 
80.48 
90.97 
88.19 
84.77 
98.00 
85.60 
92.98 
84.44 
83.08 
76.73 
79.24 

117.90 

118.80 
91.84 
81.52 

103.09 
71.05 

83.00 

90.93 
70.83 
81.54 

53.98 

41.80 
47.63 

76.65 



$ 
93.63 

95.85 
76.53 
102.52 
113.42 
112.07 
93.48 
73.95 
109.43 
84.45 

78.37 
85.09 
72.75 
66.57 
78.12 
52.17 
77.45 
66.01 
93.28 
82.25 
80.83 
52.90 
50.41 
63.02 
59.30 
59.32 
69.56 
49.00 
47.31 
49.91 
49.63 
69.07 
71.01 
67.27 
62.09 
93.30 

100.83 
74.89 
85.75 
89.68 
89.04 
89.99 
80.05 
77.98 
84.42 
86.66 

102.66 
91.31 
87.55 
89.77 
94.73 

100.73 
86.62 
79.89 
82.34 
90.65 
87.23 
85.56 
98.15 
85.34 
93.59 
84.01 
82.65 
74.55 
79.15 

116.24 

117.09 
91.46 
81.03 

102.10 
69.87 

84.37 

92.06 
72.53 
81.20 

53.39 

41.53 
47.26 

76.55 



$ 
91.89 

93.53 
74.55 
99.91 
105.90 
106.47 
92.40 
74.50 
106.67 
83.19 

77.07 

83.41 
71.25 
67.62 
78.47 
53.07 
75.80 
65.92 
89.60 
76.34 
81.18 
51.45 
48.98 
62.00 
68.70 
58.33 
68.37 
48.28 
47.23 
49.04 
47.83 
67.75 
69.99 
65.78 
59.58 
89.16 
95.67 
72.64 
83.70 
88.57 
84.68 
87.42 
79.19 
76.83 
85.36 
84.54 
104.65 
86.03 
89.98 
87.50 
92.41 
96.85 
84.59 
79.50 
80.59 
87.14 
83.98 
80.64 
95.44 
82.30 
88.82 
79.16 
80.77 
75.56 
76.00 
111.10 
112.03 
88.09 
77.56 
99.61 
67.98 

79.30 

85.86 
68.43 
79.12 

51.33 

40.27 
45.53 

74.66 



THB LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



187 



TABLE C-5— HOURS AND EARNINGS BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry 



Average Weekly 


Average Hourly 


Average Weekly 




Hours 




Earnings 




Wages 




Oct. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Oct. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Oct. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


1960 


1960 


1959 


1960 


1960 


1969 


1960 


1960 


1959 


no. 


no. 


no. 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


S 


41.8 


42.1 


43.1 


2.09 


2.07 


2.04 


87.50 


87.35 


86.17 


41.6 


42.3 


42.0 


2.17 


2.16 


2.13 


90.23 


91.32 


89.36 


42.2 


43.0 


42.9 


1.68 


1.65 


1.62 


70.91 


71.16 


69.64 


41.3 


42.0 


41.7 


2.36 


2.36 


2.32 


97.66 


98.95 


96.64 


41.5 


40.7 


41.4 


1.97 


1.94 


1.93 


82.01 


79.19 


79.86 


41.3 


41.4 


41.6 


1.78 


1.76 


1.76 


73.47 


72.84 


73.17 


41.9 


39.5 


41.2 


2.34 


2.31 


2.23 


98.09 


91.45 


91.80 


43.5 


43.5 


43.9 


1.90 


1.87 


1.83 


82.76 


81.29 


80.46 


40.7 


40.9 


41..? 


1.78 


1.77 


1.74 


72.62 


72.37 


71.68 


40.9 


41.1 


41.7 


1.94 


1.94 


1.89 


79.51 


79.63 


78.76 


40.5 


40.6 


40.9 


1.64 


1.62 


1.69 


66.53 


66.06 


64.86 


40.5 


41.0 


40.7 


1.56 


1.50 


1.53 


63.10 


61.35 


62.33 


40.2 


40.6 


41.2 


1.82 


1.81 


1.83 


73.30 


73.70 


75.56 


39.3 


43.2 


38.3 


1.24 


1.14 


1.20 


48.78 


49.01 


45.87 


42.7 


42.7 


42.9 


1.73 


1.73 


1.68 


73.84 


73.98 


71.98 


41.8 


41.9 


42.2 


1.46 


1.45 


1.41 


61.13 


60.93 


69.56 


41.7 


40.4 


40.5 


2.00 


1.99 


1.83 


83.65 


80.54 


74.28 


38.5 


39.0 


39.8 


2.30 


2.23 


2.20 


88.51 


86.81 


87.50 


40.0 


41.9 


40.4 


1.81 


1.85 


1.74 


72.28 


77.37 


70.54 


41.2 


41.5 


42.2 


1.81 


1.82 


1.82 


74.67 


75.27 


76.53 


39.4 


40.3 


39.5 


1.21 


1.20 


1.19 


47.86 


48.61 


47.07 


38.4 


40.1 


38.8 


1.16 


1.16 


1.15 


44.45 


46.38 


44.75 


41.8 


40.8 


40.9 


1.33 


1.31 


1.27 


55.54 


53.48 


62.01 


42.1 


42.1 


43.1 


1.35 


1.34 


1.30 


66.71 


56.63 


66.05 


40.1 


40.3 


41.4 


1.36 


1.36 


1.30 


54.51 


64.77 


63.85 


43.3 


43.6 


44.2 


1.26 


1.25 


1.22 


54.61 


54.35 


53.84 


43.2 


43.5 


44.5 


1.43 


1.43 


1.38 


61.79 


62.16 


61.63 


38.8 


38.2 


39.0 


1.15 


1.15 


1.11 


44.80 


43.86 


43.49 


37.9 


37.4 


38.0 


1.16 


1.15 


1.14 


43.89 


43.08 


43.25 


37.2 


36.6 


37.5 


1.22 


1.21 


1.16 


45.33 


44.25 


43.68 


42.0 


41.4 


41.9 


1.08 


1.08 


1.04 


45.54 


44.91 


43.50 


41.5 


41.8 


42.6 


1.69 


1.68 


1.53 


65.95 


66.99 


65.39 


40.6 


40.7 


42.0 


1.70 


1.69 


1.63 


68.93 


68.82 


68.62 


43.5 


43.4 


44.4 


1.45 


1.45 


1.40 


63.23 


63.02 


61.95 


41.8 


43.5 


42.0 


1.34 


1.32 


1.32 


65.97 


67.30 


.66.55 


41.7 


41.8 


41.7 


2.11 


2.10 


2.01 


87.70 


87.93 


83.64 


41.7 


42.0 


41.6 


2.28 


2.26 


2.16 


94.90 


94.99 


89.78 


41.6 


41.5 


42.0 


1.64 


1.65 


1.68 


68.35 


68.66 


66.59 


39.2 


39.3 


40.1 


2.16 


2.18 


2.10 


84.72 


86.66 


83.91 


40.6 


40.8 


41.8 


2.09 


2.09 


2.04 


84.93 


85.18 


85.28 


39.0 


38.8 


39.2 


2.02 


2.01 


2.00 


78.82 


78.24 


78.32 


38.0 


41.4 


41.0 


2.07 


2.01 


1.97 


78.86 


83.15 


80.63 


41.5 


41.6 


42.3 


1.77 


1.78 


1.76 


73.37 


73.95 


74.44 


41.4 


40.9 


42.6 


1.7? 


1.78 


1.73 


73.41 


72.68 


73. 80 


40.8 


40.6 


42.2 


1.98 


1.96 


1.95 


80.62 


79.87 


82.26 


41.4 


41.6 


41.9 


1.96 


1.95 


1.91 


81.18 


81.02 


SO. 03 


40.1 


39.7 


42.2 


ii.50 


2.49 


2.42 


100.25 


98.91 


102.24 


40.9 


42.2 


41.9 


2.0? 


2.07 


1.97 


82.60 


87.60 


82.71 


40.8 


40.5 


42.4 


2.03 


2.02 


2.02 


82.68 


81.70 


85.81 


40.5 


40.7 


40.6 


2.05 


2.06 


2.02 


82.96 


83.78 


82.01 


41.9 


42.0 


42.8 


2.07 


2.07 


2.00 


86.78 


87.01 


86.78 


40.8 


41.2 


39.7 


2.24 


2.26 


2.24 


91.41 


93.26 


89.07 


39.6 


40.1 


40.5 


2.00 


2.01 


1.96 


79.24 


80.69 


79.63 


40.0 


39.5 


39.7 


1.96 


1.96 


1.95 


78.32 


77.35 


77.41 


39.4 


40.3 


40.5 


1.98 


2.00 


1.93 


78.25 


80.72 


78.46 


40.9 


40.8 


41.0 


2.09 


2.08 


1.99 


85.61 


85.01 


81.46 


43.8 


43.4 


43.1 


1.84 


1.82 


1.76 


80.67 


78.82 


76.44 


39.9 


40.0 


40.3 


1.98 


1.98 


1.86 


79.28 


79.42 


75.15 


40.3 


40.3 


40.4 


2.31 


2.30 


2.22 


93.13 


92.62 


89.74 


40.6 


40.7 


41.1 


1.84 


1.85 


1.78 


74.67 


75.02 


73.06 


40.4 


41.0 


40.5 


2.05 


2.06 


1.99 


82.81 


84.71 


80.64 


40.8 


40.6 


40.8 


1.68 


1.68 


1.69 


68.54 


68.23 


66.05 


40.2 


39.9 


41.2 


1.88 


1.88 


1.80 


75.62 


74.93 


73.95 


40.9 


39.8 


42.9 


2.03 


2.06 


1.97 


82.93 


82.04 


84.28 


40.7 


40.9 


41.0 


1.73 


1.73 


1.68 


70.37 


70.89 


68.85 


42.8 


42.9 


44.2 


1.82 


1.81 


1.74 


77.99 


77.81 


77.03 


43.0 


42.0 


43.6 


1.64 


1.63 


1.63 


70.40 


68.62 


70. 9S 


40.7 


40.9 


42.3 


1.83 


1.83 


1.71 


74.65 


74.70 


72.27 


41.5 


40.8 


41.1 


2.55 


2.66 


2.46 


105.93 


103.89 


100.68 


40.3 


40.6 


41.1 


2.00 


1.99 


1.90 


80.74 


80.96 


78.23 


39.8 


39.5 


40.4 


1.63 


1.63 


1.46 


60.91 


60.58 


68.41 


40.2 


40.4 


41.3 


2.31 


2.28 


2.20 


92.79 


92.08 


90.88 


42.2 


41.9 


42.3 


1.45 


1.45 


1.41 


61.31 


60.73 


59.62 


41.9 


43.1 


41.5 


1.95 


1.94 


1.87 


81.70 


83.56 


77.81 


41.7 


42.7 


41.0 


2.14 


2.12 


2.04 


89.30 


90.69 


83.62 


42.1 


43.7 


42.4 


1.62 


1.63 


1.57 


68.20 


71.17 


66. 8C 


43.4 


43.6 


44.6 


1.85 


1.85 


1.77 


80.43 


80.60 


78. 8C 


38.9 


39.0 


39.5 


1.06 


1.05 


1.01 


41.22 


40.91 


39.86 


38.8 


39.2 


39.4 


1.04 


1.02 


0.99 


40.12 


39.90 


39.07 


40.1 


39.7 


40.5 


1.02 


1.01 


0.98 


40.73 


40.29 


39.55 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables. 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt Uquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (text'le and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

•Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

*Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

♦Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

*Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

•Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment' 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and appli- 
ances 

Wire and cable 

Miscellaneous electrical products 

•Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkahs and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

* Durable manufactured goods industries. 



188 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBHUARY 1961 



TABLE C-6— EARNINGS AND HOURS OF HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS 



Period 



Average 

Hours 

Worked 

Per Week 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



Index Number of 
Average Weekly 
Wages (1949 = 100) 



Current 1949 

Dollars Dollars 



Monthly Average 1955 
Monthly Average 1956 
Monthly Average 1957 
Monthly Average 1958 
Monthly Average 1959 

Last Pay Period in : 

1959 November... 
December 

1960 January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

Octobert ■ 

Novembert. . 



No. 

41.0 
41.0 
40.4 
40.2 
40.7 



40.9 
38.4* 

40.7 
40.4 
40.5 
40.5 
40.1 
40.4 
40.6 
40.5 
40.9 
40.6 



1.45 
1.52 
1.61 
1.66 
1.72 



1.74 
1.78 

1.77 
1.77 
1.78 
1.79 
1.79 
1.79 
1.77 
1.76 
1.77 
1.78 
1.79 



59.45 
62.40 



66.77 
70.16 



71.08 
68.48* 

71.89 

71.49 

71.94 

72.37 

71.69 

72.19 

72.01t 

17.46 

72.37 

72.66 

72.80 



No. 

142.4 
149.5 
155.6 
160.0 
168.1 



170.3 
164.1 

172.2 
171.3 
172.4 
173.4 
171.8 
173.0 
172.5 
171.2 
173.4 
174.1 
174.4 



122.4 
126.3 
127.4 
127.7 
132.8 



133.1 

128.7 

135.4 
135.0 
135.2 
136.1 
134.6 
135.6 
134.9 
133.3 
134.0 
134.3 
134.6 



Note: The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wages in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, DBS, page ii. 

* December 1959 figures adjusted for the holidays are 40.8 hours and 171.52. 

t Revised. 

t Latest figures subject to revision. 



D — ^National Employment Service Statistics 

Tables D-1 to D-5 are based on regular statistical reports from local offices of the 
National Employment Service. These statistics are compiled from two different reporting 
forms, UIC 751: statistical report on employment operations by industry, and UIC 757: 
inventory of registrations and vacancies by occupation. The data on applicants and 
vacancies in these two reporting forms are not identical. 

TABLE D-1-UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Period 


Unfilled Vacancies* 


Registrations for Employment 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Date Nearest: 

January 1, 1955 


8,420 
17,986 
19,784 
7,450 
8,643 

9,097 

8,206 
8,431 
10,402 
15,913 
21,772 
17,227 
14,673 
13,748 
12,239 
11,944 
15,932 

9,859 


7,776 
12,111 
13,440 
7,270 
8,549 

9,779 

10,325 
10,676 
11,830 
14,487 
17,210 
15,875 
12,594 
14,427 
13,796 
10,866 
10,799 

7,996 


16,196 
30,097 
33,224 
14,720 
17,192 

18,876 

18,531 
19,107 
22,232 
30,400 
38,982 
33,102 
27,267 
28,175 
26,035 
22,810 
26.731 

17,855 


371,959 
312,066 
343,956 
596,104 
562,257 

522,206 

606,165 
634,332 
652,107 
581,558 
389,576 
258,719 
242,582 
236,969 
228,632 
281,484 
393,856 

570,789 


93,805 
84,815 
92,207 
147,349 
158,163 

157,962 

180,129 
182,721 
182,883 
174,874 
152,848 
131,936 
128,062 
117,044 
115,358 
124,255 
144,123 

163,893 


465,764 


January 1, 1956 


396,881 


January 1,1957 


436,163 


January 1, 1958 


743,453 


January 1,1959 


720,420 


January 1, 1960 


680,168 


February 1,1960 


786,294 


March 1,1960 


817,053 


April 1,1960 


834,990 


May 1,1960 


756,432 


June 1, 1960 


542,424 


July 1,1960 


390,655 


August 1,1960 


370,644 


September 1, 1960 ... 


354,013 


October. . . 1, 1960 


343,990 


November 1, 1960 

December 1, 1960 


405,739 
537,979 


January 1,19610) 


734,682 







0) Latest figures subject to revision. 

• Current Vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1967 



189 



TABLE D-2— UNFILLED VACANCIES BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX AS AT 

NOVEMBER 30, 1960(0 

(Souece: Form U.I.C. 751) 



Industry 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Change from 



October 
31, 1960 



November 
30, 1959 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping 

Foresty 

Mining, Quarrying and OU Wells 

Metal Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal Mining 

Quarrying, Clay and Sand Pits 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Foods and Beverages 

Tobacco and Tobacco Products 

Rubber Products 

Leather Products 

Textile Products (except clothing) 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Wood Products 

Paper Products 

Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries. . . , 

Iron and Steel Products 

Transportation Equipment 

Non-Ferrous Metal Products 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 

Products of Petroleum and Coal 

Chemical Products 

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 

Construction 

General Contractors 

Special Trade Contractors 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 

Public UtUity Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail v 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

Community or Public Service 

Government Service 

Recreation Service 

Business Service 

Personal Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



178 
595 

337 

234 
63 



1,967 

120 

46 

21 

44 

35 

65 

137 

283 

116 

274 

271 

102 

178 

41 

23 

128 



408 
400 

436 

270 

5 

161 

53 

1,639 

510 
1,129 

iU 

9,766 

285 

8,827 

25 

309 

320 



66 
6 

ISO 

7 
6 

1 
1 
5 

1,130 

136 

5 

12 

62 

57 

449 
31 
31 
73 
51 
44 
17 
50 
19 
7 
41 
45 

30 

14 
16 

103 

46 

5 

52 

17 

1,576 

243 
1,333 

343 

7,662 

1,494 

2,399 

32 

237 

3,500 



244 
601 

357 

241 
69 
10 
3 
34 

3,097 

256 
51 
33 
106 
92 
514 
168 
314 
189 
325 
315 
119 



30 



422 
416 

539 

316 

10 

213 



3,215 

753 
2,462 

767 

17,428 

1,779 

11,226 

67 

546 
3,820 



- 150 

- 451 

- 102 

- 34 
71 

- 15 

- 1 
+ 19 



754 

160 

39 

3 

45 
24 

188 

95 

3 

43 

149 
12 
24 
25 
2 
14 
77 
49 



472 

319 
153 

54 

8 

18 
44 



752 

153 
599 



+ 6,952 

- 119 
+ 8,133 

40 

- 251 

- 771 



56 

- 798 

23 



- 11 
+ 3 



781 

31 

9 

2 

32 

72 

210 

107 

216 

63 

222 

133 

55 

20 

46 

4 

12 



433 

395 



145 

159 
14 
28 



- 398 

- 148 

- 250 

- 143 

+ 2,610 

- 104 
+ 3,954 

32 

- 151 

- 1,057 



16,202 



10,953 



27,155 



+ 4,124 



- 193 



(0 Preliminary— subject to revision. 

Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



190 



THE LABOUR GAZBTTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



TABLE D-3— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 
BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX AS AT DECEMBER 1, 1960(0 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Occupational Group 



Professional and Managerial Workers 

Clerical Workers 

Sales Workers 

Personal and Domestic Service Workers. 

Seamen 

Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.) 

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers. ...... 

Food and kindred products (incl. 

tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Stone, clay and glass products 

Metalworking 

Electrical. 

Transportation and equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) 

Communications and public utility. . 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

GRAND TOTAL 



Unfilled Vacancies(2) 



Male 



1,424 

5,894 

1,128 

414 



164 



34 
65 

674 
81 
31 
16 
336 
168 
7 

78 

501 

413 

15 

104 

699 

38 

38 



63 

67 

39 

,686 

751 



15,933 



Female 



1,174 
3,696 
1,097 
3.817 



11 
739 



555 

2 



265 

65 

4 

3 



193 



10,799 



Total 



2,598 
9,590 
2,225 
4,231 
4 
175 
4,037 

43 

620 

676 

87 

82 

16 

344 

175 

7 

78 

502 

418 

16 

179 

713 

42 

39 

3,871 

128 

71 

42 

2,686 

944 



26,731 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



7,385 
18,194 

7,597 
34,949 

2,235 

5,098 

179,776 

1,696 
3,528 

15,878 

1,225 

1,348 

636 

22,179 
3,419 
1,177 
2,121 

49,182 

33,246 

840 

6,194 

26,947 
3,634 
6,526 

138,622 

5,177 

15,699 

9,882 

68,605 

39,259 



393,856 



Female 



49,663 

14,660 

26,696 

17 

685 

24,321 

533 

15,307 

158 

610 

1,464 

46 

1,024 

1,261 

31 



7 

171 

16 

2,253 

1,151 

285 



26,165 

6,734 

515 

660 

1 

18,255 



144,123 



Total 



9,301 

67,857 

22,257 

61,645 

2,252 

5,783 

204,097 

2,229 

18,835 

16,036 

1,835 

2,812 

682 

23,203 

4,680 

1,208 

2,121 

49,189 

33,417 

856 

8,447 

28,098 

3,919 

6,530 

164,787 
11,911 
16,214 
10,542 
68,606 
57,514 



537,979 



(1) Preliminary— subject to revision. 

(2) Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7967 



191 



TABLE D-4— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS AT DECEMBER 1, 1960 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 





Unfilled Vacancies(2) 


Registrations 


Office 


0) 

Dec. 1, 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Nov. 3. 

1960 


Previous 

Year 

Dec. 3. 

1959 


0) 

Dec. 1. 
1960 


Previous 

Month 

Nov. 3, 

1960 


Previous 

Year 

Dec. 3. 

1959 




285 

16 

5 

264 

71 

44 
27 

1,232 

15 

13 

961 


306 

16 

7 
283 

137 

48 
89 

1,233 

13 

21 

1.017 


391 

26 

12 

353 

89 

61 

28 

1,159 

15 
11 

891 


15,278 

3,018 

1.533 

10,727 

2,543 

1.509 
1,034 

20,922 

968 
1,234 
5,265 

389 
2,023 

509 
2,509 

981 
3,960 
1,439 
1,645 

20,072 

2,600 
1,620 
1,129 
1,579 

473 
4,796 
1,512 
3,422 
1,315 

571 
1,055 

154,840 

1,342 

652 

533 

1,170 

984 

1,023 

647 

1,936 

380 

1,054 

2,147 

575 

336 

835 

2,330 

3,526 

3,625 

2,523 

8C9 

1,020 

649 

3,339 

1,115 

656 

760 

923 

989 

758 

1,165 

60,156 

1,144 

605 

11,068 

2,574 

2,499 

1,049 

2,183 

801 

958 

2,208 

2,098 

2,098 

2,626 

1,748 

3,313 

4,446 

1,981 

1,458 

4.163 


7,534 

1,673 

860 

5,001 

1,288 
745 
543 

15,978 

571 

831 
4,628 

208 
1,300 

413 
1,838 

878 
3,085 
1,104 
1.122 

13,341 

1.196 

1.317 
579 

1.321 
426 

3.108 
923 

2.700 
828 
365 
578 

115,628 

1,097 

383 

377 

746 

710 

788 

242 

1.623 

324 

668 

1,454 

434 

217 

316 

1.607 

2.421 

2,568 

1.828 

550 

499 

512 

2,307 

748 

511 

420 

488 

504 

411 

626 

49,002 

403 

386 

8.434 

1,484 

1,412 

720 

1,766 

572 

745 

1.635 

1.537 

1.716 

1.382 

1,030 

2,459 

4,071 

1,601 

936 

3.123 


12,686 




2.523 
1,232 
8.931 

3,028 

1.997 


Grand Falls 




Prince Edward Island 




Summerside 


1,031 
20,035 


Nova Scotia 


Amherst 


815 




1,259 
5 212 


Halifax 




545 




69 

8 
28 


68 
18 
13 


58 
6 
16 


1,685 


Liverpool 


495 




2,587 


Springhill 


1 205 




72 
25 
41 

1,032 

19 

80 

8 

154 
50 

296 
13 

316 
22 
16 
58 

5,081 

13 

18 

27 

13 

23 

141 

52 

95 

26 

83 

57 

8 

1 

2 

5 

76 

37 

23 

11 

50 

97 

22 

35 

5 

11 

24 

53 

13 

9 

1.874 

109 

2 

388 

68 

18 

49 

169 

69 

48 

17 

31 

89 

56 

181 

79 

228 

74 

25 

79 


45 

9 

29 

1,236 

18 

27 

17 

120 

118 

750 

3 

129 

36 

10 

8 

5,263 

8 

17 

31 

26 

22 

78 

6 

145 

25 

19 

43 

10 

4 

5 

21 

42 

43 

20 

18 

29 

179 

28 

15 

6 

7 

9 

22 

20 

12 

1.976 

66 

5 

455 

51 

8 

57 

128 

54 

73 

19 

25 

50 

31 

294 

41 

284 

54 

30 

179 


57 
33 

72 

1,071 

9 
40 
30 

130 
42 

397 
2 

271 
35 
45 
70 

5,005 

5 

2 
109 
14 
10 
210 
22 
99 
13 

2 
34 

7 
77 

2 
16 
21 
97 
12 
26 

6 

518 

31 

7 

2 
11 
26 


3,247 


Truro 


1,339 




1,646 


New Brunswick 


19,967 




2,809 


Campbellton 


1 118 




1,170 




1,723 


Minto 


454 




4,979 


Newcastle . ... 


1 875 




2,494 


St Stephen 


1 647 




544 


Woodstock 


1,154 


Quebec 


146,282 

2,043 
629 


Alma 




Baie Comeau . . . . 


560 




1,092 


Buckingham 


914 




961 


Chandler 


830 




1,584 




428 


Dolbeau . . . ' 


801 




1,984 


Famham 


692 


Forestville 


473 


Gaspe 


904 




1,392 


Hull 


3,283 


Joliette 


3,657 


Jonqui^re 


2,203 




623 


La Malbaie 


1.143 


La Tuque 


798 


L6vis 


2.900 


Louise ville 


923 




672 


Maniwaki 


514 


Matane 


1.352 


M6gantic 


962 




31 

5 

1.805 

10 

2 

295 

78 

7 

15 

109 

48 

63 

26 

67 

64 

93 

177 

188 

137 

34 

74 

147 


569 




1,156 


Montreal. . , 


54,708 




1,112 


Port Alfred 


547 


Quebec 


11,319 


Bimouski 


2,745 




2,577 


Roberval 


826 


Rouyn 


2,027 


Ste. Agathe 


896 


Ste. Anne de Bellevue 


942 


Ste. Th^r^se 


2,171 


St. Hyacinthe 


2,189 


St. Jean 


2,062 


St. Jerome 


1,762 


Sept-Iles 


1,094 




3,371 




4,594 


Sorel 


2,326 


Thetford Mines 


1,643 


Trois-Rivi^res 


4,333 



192 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7961 



TABLE D-4-UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS AT DECEMBER 1, 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



1960 



Office 



Quebec— Cont'd. 

Vald'Or 

Valley field 

Victoriaville 

Ville St. Georges. 

Ontario 

Arnprior 

Barrie 

Belleville 

Bracebridge 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brock ville , 

Carle ton Place.... 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Cornwall 

Elliot Lake 

Fort Erie 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Gananoque 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Hawkesbury 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Kirkland Lake... 

Kitchener 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

London 

Long Branch 

Midland 

Napanee 

Newmarket 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Oakville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound .... 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Colbome . . . , 

Prescott 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines.. . , 

St. Thomas 

Samia 

Sault Ste. Marie.. 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 

Smiths Falls 

Stratford 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 

Tillsonburg 

Timmins 

Toronto 

Trenton 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Welland 

Weston 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Manitoba 

Brandon , 

Dauphin 

Flin Flon 

Portage la Prairie. 

The Pas 

Winnipeg 



Unfilled Vacancies (2) 



0) 



Dec. 1, 
1960 



57 

14 

88 

239 

10,605 

24 

7 

251 

79 

17 

49 

41 

12 

76 

47 

1 

109 

42 

4 

10 

64 

165 



110 

647 

7 

8 

8 

77 

69 

100 

19 

8 

32 

1,150 

107 

25 

6 

35 
156 
34 
94 
7 
82 
765 
35 



59 

16 

37 

3 

269 
50 
20 
15 
95 
91 
65 

130 
90 
10 
1 
36 
14 

494 
18 
27 
3,354 
58 
23 
14 
74 

173 

764 
17 

3,579 

179 
17 
47 
58 
57 
3,221 



Pre'ious 
Month 
Nov. 3. 



47 

12 

25 

389 

,200 

43 
19 
29 
18 
56 
43 
33 
10 
29 
43 
3 

104 
38 
4 
13 
76 
54 
3 
17 
29 

896 
12 
20 
16 

129 
34 

124 

21 

8 

43 

462 

105 
6 
5 
41 
35 
28 
92 
12 
69 

807 
51 



70 

19 

36 

6 

156 
9 
14 
13 

118 
36 
94 

131 
77 
4 
7 

65 
22 

334 
23 
30 
2,702 
64 
36 
15 
64 

165 

193 
17 

1,732 

162 
15 
25 
55 
49 
1,426 



Previous 

Year 

Dec. 3, 

1959 



43 
19 
12 

77 

10,915 

92 
10 
36 
28 
30 
87 
42 

4 
48 
21 

6 
113 
38 

2 

23 
139 
81 

5 

11 

50 

727 

17 

8 
12 
59 
97 



29 

15 

1,067 

90 

20 

4 

27 

221 

12 

145 

23 

108 

1,671 

94 

2 

52 

18 

42 

7 

300 



1 

222 

13 

69 

3,428 

62 

26 

4 

47 

100 

329 

26 

3,909 

183 
11 
40 
69 
59 
3,547 



Registrations 



0) 

Dec. 1, 
1960 



1,850 

2,214 

2,156 

1,643 

182,266 

278 

1,281 

1,891 

1,083 

1,394 

3,342 

730 

257 

2,080 

968 

882 

3,303 

317 

809 

603 

2,319 

1,872 

336 

631 

1,996 

16,218 

741 

957 

841 

2,110 

1,439 

3,088 

1,036 

591 

362 

5,469 

4,209 

810 

529 

1,369 

2,789 

1,865 

1,031 

1,180 

4,471 

6,058 

1,526 

380 

1,758 

575 

3,339 

391 

3,401 

1,051 

734 

451 

3,998 

1,396 

3,048 

3,480 

906 

186 

449 

810 

906 

4,002 

323 

2,031 

43,391 

809 

846 

666 

2,508 

3,754 

10,309 

1,307 

22,540 

2,028 
1,366 

267 
1,002 

335 
17,542 



Previous 

Month 

Nov. 3, 

1960 



1,420 
1,640 
1,530 
1,245 

148,423 

203 

1,145 

1,552 

691 

1,259 

2,813 

630 

131 

1,651 

641 

564 

2,750 

249 

553 

313 

1,655 

1,704 

215 

421 

1,659 

13,428 

433 

796 

485 

1,737 

1,013 

2,208 

975 

460 

246 

4,681 

3,582 

498 

356 

1,031 

2,071 

1,352 

907 

917 

5,000 

5,013 

1,100 

317 

1,299 

422 

2,910 

272 

2,298 

796 

553 

309 

3,360 

1,221 

2,195 

2,048 

892 

109 

338 

589 

621 

2,827 

355 

1,644 

38,104 

699 

548 

488 

2,013 

3,209 

7,804 

1,095 

15,034 

1,133 

648 

200 

556 

244 

12,253 



Previous 

Year 

Dec. 3. 

1959 



1,582 
1,837 
1,899 
1,678 

176,818 

278 

1,311 

1,614 

1,141 

1,584 

2,692 

520 

341 

1,838 

1,062 

585 

2,927 

367 

732 

518 

2,520 

1,364 

295 

513 

1,574 

12,708 

754 

677 

788 

2,174 

1,281 

1,998 

1,248 

833 

337 

4,925 

3,697 

937 

603 

1,390 

2,528 

1,570 

828 

1,019 

10,808 

6,064 

1,508 

496 

1,692 

524 

3,063 

524 

3,280 

961 

758 

568 

6,122 

1,512 

2,175 

1,659 

1,067 

188 

425 

825 

892 

3,697 

397 

1,993 

39,758 

855 

707 

731 

1,633 

3,764 

13,019 

1,082 

19,278 

2,098 
1,431 

271 
1,118 

336 
14,024 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



193 



TABLE D-4-UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS AT DECEMBER 1, 1960 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Office 



Unfilled Vacancies(2) 



0) 
Dec. 1, 



Previous 

Month 

Nov. 3, 

1960 



Previous 

Year 

Dec. 3, 



Registrations 



0) 
Dec. 1, 



Previous 

Month 
Nov. 3, 



Previous 

Year 

Dec. 3, 

1959 



Saskatchewan 

Estevan 

Lloydminster 

Moose Jaw 

North Battleford. 

Prince Albert 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Swift Current 

Weybum 

Yorkton 

Alberta 

Blairmore 

Calgary 

Drumheller 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Grande Prairie. . . 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Red Deer 

British Columbia. . . . 

Chilliwack 

Courtenay 

Cranbrook 

Dawson Creek 

Duncan 

Kamloops 

Kelowna 

Kitimat 

Mission City 

Nanaimo 

Nelson 

New Westminster 

Penticton 

Port Albemi 

Prince George 

Prince Rupert 

Princeton 

Quesnel 

Trail 

Vancouver 

Vernon 

Victoria 

Whitehorse 

Canada 

Male 

Female 



1,202 

24 
20 
97 
47 
75 
178 
136 
67 
34 
524 

1,821 

2 

381 

10 

1,056 

45 

48 

66 

149 

64 

1,823 

34 
11 
31 
16 
33 
14 
13 
30 
23 
55 

218 

330 
8 
25 
35 
13 
34 
52 
64 

559 
12 

192 
21 

26,731 

15,932 
10,799 



1,218 

20 

24 

64 

39 

103 

217 

207 

83 

17 

444 

1,711 

24 

439 

10 

890 

76 

42 

101 

56 

73 

1,774 

25 
13 
54 
23 

16 
15 
22 
34 
28 
18 

251 

200 
9 
7 
34 
10 
52 
15 
67 

720 
8 

111 
42 

22,810 

11,914 
10,866 



754 

45 
6 
212 
22 
35 
158 
134 
56 
27 



2,364 

1 

917 

16 

1,028 

12 



114 
194 
82 

2,218 

16 

4 
16 
16 
22 
76 

6 
15 
11 
11 
14 
268 

7 
24 
89 
17 

6 
28 
63 
1,069 
18 
399 
23 

27,875 
15,201 
12,674 



16,244 

506 

406 

1,474 

1,070 

2,004 

3,934 

3,740 

797 

437 

1,876 

30,872 

363 

10,805 

354 

13,029 

678 

854 

2,224 

1,209 

1,366 

72,402 

2,059 
1,411 
1,114 



1,509 
1,254 

218 
1,406 
1.372 
1,186 
10,198 
1,341 

870 
2,884 
1,802 

551 
1.380 

918 

30,896 

2,169 

5,468 

547 

537,979 

393,856 
144,123 



9,676 

227 

224 

933 

583 

1,095 

2,704 

2,310 

390 

199 

1,011 

22,364 

374 
8,271 

228 
9,296 

497 

548 
1,421 

897 



56,473 

1,326 
905 
700 
729 
564 



166 

898 
1,110 

737 
8,825 

842 

728 
2,305 
1,243 

348 
1,113 

582 

25,666 

1,083 

4.581 



405,739 

281,484 
124,255 



16,095 

498 

364 

1,475 

1,035 

1,929 

3.656 

3.643 

815 

462 

2.218 

27,076 

498 

9,411 

372 

12.259 

518 



1.989 

935 

1.094 

61,621 

1,738 

799 

899 
1,138 

736 
1,289 
1,188 

214 
1,371 
1,000 
1,181 
8,458 
1.307 

698 
2,343 
1,540 

431 
1,176 

995 

25.825 

1,884 

4,847 

564 

502,886 

365,031 
137.855 



1 Preliminary subject to revision. 

2 Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-5— PLACEMENTS EFFECTED BY EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 

(Soukce: Form U.I.C. 751) 
1955—1960 



Year 



Total 



Male 



Female 



Atlantic 


Quebec 


Region 


Region 


67,619 


222.370 


68,522 


252,783 


59,412 


215,335 


56,385 


198.386 


70.352 


239,431 


63.094 


222.675 


78.989 


230.880 



Ontario 
Region 



Prairie 
Region 



Pacific 
Region 



1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1959 (11 months) 

1960 (11 months) 



953,576 
1,046,979 
877,704 
840.129 
986.073 
911.272 
872,762 



642,726 
748.464 
586,780 
548,663 
661,872 
613.613 
584.323 



310,850 
298.515 
290,924 
291,466 
324,201 
297,659 
288,439 



343,456 
379,085 
309,077 
287,112 
336,527 
311,944 
274,312 



178,015 
210,189 
185,962 
181,772 
211,951 
196,070 
179,899 



142,116 
136,400 
107,918 
116,474 
127.812 
117,489 
108,682 



194 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 796? 



E — Unemployment Insurance 



TABLE E-l— BENEFICIARIES AND BENEFIT PAYMENTS BY PROVINCE, 

NOVEMBER 1960 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province 


Estimated 
Average 

Number of 
Beneficiaries 

Per Week 
(in thousands) 


Weeks Paid 


Amount of 
Benefit Paid 


Newfoundland 


5.7 

0.8 
10.9 

9.8 
80.7 
98.2 
10.2 

6.1 
14.4 
36.1 


24,008 

3,148 

45,978 

41,076 

339,048 

412,446 

42,777 

25,504 

60,473 

151,730 


651,713 


Prince Edward Island 


61,797 


Nova Scotia 


967,140 


New Brunswick 


885,243 




7,648,821 


Ontario 


9,746,054 




980,260 


Saskatchewan 


568,348 


Alberta 


1,415,631 


British Columbia 


3,758,601 






Total, Canada, Nov. 1960 


272.9 
225.9 
209.6 


1,146,188 
903,403 
838,456 


26,583,608 


Total Canada, Oct. 1960 


20,650,922 


Total, Canada, Nov. 1959 


17,479,376 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 796 f 



195 



TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS* CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES BY 

NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, AND PERCENTAGE 

POSTAL, NOVEMBER 30, 1960 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province and Sex 



Total 
claimants 



Number of weeks on claim 



2 or 



3-4 



5-8 



-12 13 



17-20 



Over 
20 



Percent- 
age 
Postal 



Nov. 30, 

1959 

Total 

claimants 



Canada 

Male 

Female 

Newfoundland 

Male 

Female 

Prince Edward Island 

Male 

Female 

Nova Scotia 

Male 

Female 

New Brunswick 

Male 

Female 

Quebec 

Male 

Female 

Ontario 

Male 

Female 

Manitoba 

Male 

Female 

Saskatchewan 

Male 

Female 

Alberta 

Male 

Female 

British Columbia .... 

Male 

Female 



485,177 
364,136 
121,041 



220,925 
179,302 
41,623 



60,053 
47,125 
12,928 



73,222 
54,762 
18,460 



41,677 
28,480 
13,197 



26,881 
17,468 
9,413 



17,366 
10,497 
6,869 



45,053 
26,502 
18,551 



30.1 
32.4 
23.5 



417,541 
308,477 
109,064 



16,401 

14,928 

1,473 

2,576 

1,999 

577 

22,561 
19,190 
3,371 

18,745 
14,954 
3,791 

140,109 
101,468 
38,641 

155,506 
110,964 
44,542 

22,218 
17,240 
4,978 

13,834 
10,847 
2,987 

27,471 

21,271 

6,200 

' 65,756 
51,275 
14,481 



9,738 

9,289 

449 

1,698 

1,407 

291 

11,597 

10,466 

1,131 

8,415 
7,039 
1,376 

62,979 
49,112 
13,867 

66,029 
51,036 
14,993 

10,496 
8,754 
1,742 

7,050 

6,105 

945 

12,741 

10.984 

1,757 

30,182 
25,110 
5,072 



1,812 

1,700 

112 

277 

215 

62 

2,185 

1,864 

321 

2,554 

2,031 

523 

17,185 
13,180 
4,005 

18.857 
14,140 
4,717 

3,097 

2,463 

634 

1,917 

1,599 

318 



.859 
,180 
679 



8.310 
6.753 
1,557 



1,763 
1.563 



234 
179 
55 

2,900 

2,425 

475 

2,956 
2.370 



21,092 
15,413 
5,679 

23,745 
16,886 
6,859 

3,773 

2,964 

809 

1,979 

1,498 

481 

4,429 
3,307 
1,122 

10,351 
8,157 
2,194 



754 
618 
136 

110 
62 
48 

1.803 

1.425 

378 

1,453 

1,127 

326 

12.532 
8,633 
3,899 

14,246 
9,311 
4,935 

1.690 

1,110 

580 

881 
525 
356 

2.294 

1.400 

894 

5.914 
4,269 
1,645 



512 
386 
126 

64 
35 
29 

1,027 

747 
280 

1,076 

814 
262 

7,774 
4,939 
2,835 

9,743 
6,228 
3,517 

1,097 
710 
387 



367 
297 

1,381 
826 
555 

3,543 

2,418 
1,125 



466 
346 
120 

44 
30 
14 

711 
510 
201 

635 
419 
216 

5,241 
2,856 
2,385 

6,245 
3,851 
2,394 

612 
390 
222 

391 
234 
157 

878 
490 



2,143 
1,371 

772 



1,356 

1,026 

330 

149 
71 
78 

2,338 

1,753 

585 

1,656 

1,154 

502 

13,306 
7,335 
5,971 

16,641 
9,514 
7,127 

1,453 
849 
604 

952 
519 
433 

1,889 

1,084 

805 

5,313 
3,197 
2,116 



73.4 
75.7 
49.8 

73.3 
76.0 
64.1 

40.7 
41.2 
37.6 



53.6 

30.1 
32.8 
23.2 

20.7 
21.0 
19.9 

25.6 
28.9 
14.1 

48.3 
52.2 
34.2 

28.3 
30.5 
20.7 

27.0 
28.5 
21.9 



12,427 

11,341 

1,086 

3,626 

2,053 

573 

17,197 
13,984 
3,213 

16,845 
13,068 
3,777 

122,529 
87,818 
34,711 

143,364 
102,746 
40,618 

16,268 
12,365 
3,903 

12,623 
9,816 
2.807 

21,140 
15,534 
5,606 

52,522 
39,752 
12,770 



Changes in the wording of this heading do not involve any change in concept. 



196 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1961 



TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT BY PROVINCE, 

NOVEMBER, 1960 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Claims i 


lied at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims Pending 
at End of Month 


Province 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




12,115 
1,990 
14,347 
11,527 
84,982 
92,992 
14,635 
10,126 
18,759 
42,943 


10,276 

1,662 

8,096 

8,360 

58,461 

60,083 

10,380 

7,458 

12,353 

30,280 


1,839 

328 

6,251 

3,167 

26,521 

32,909 

4,255 

2,668 

6,406 

12,663 


7,268 

1,150 
12,247 

9,266 
69,427 
79,326 
12,406 

7,998 
16,078 
35,295 


5,771 

989 

10,534 

7,800 
55.280 
62,847 

9,573 

6,121 
12,830 
25,779 


1,497 

161 

1,713 

1,466 

14,147 

16,479 

2,833 

1,877 

3,248 

9,516 


6,141 
997 


Nova Scotia 


4 484 




3,920 


Quebec 


30,076 




31.341 


Manitoba 


4,077 




3,396 


Alberta 


5,352 


British Colum.bia . 


14,284 






Total, Canada, Nov. 1960 

Total, Canada, Oct. 1960 

Total, Canada, Nov. 1959 


304,416 
178,211 
278,592 


207,409 
103,919 
193,734 


97,007 
74,292 

84,858 


250,461 
162,512 
221,207 


197,524 
122,331 
171,906 


52,937 
40,181 
49,301 


104,068 
50,113 
99,037 



* In addition, revised claims received numbered 41,424. 

t In addition, 39,182 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 4,568 were special requests not granted and 1,405 
were appeals by claimants. There were 10,514 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



TABLE E-4— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT, OCTOBER 1959 TO OCTOBER 1960 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



End of 


Total 


Employed 


Claimants 


I960 — October 


4,124,900 
4,037,000 
4,040,000 
4,024,000 
4,048,000 
3,988,000 
4,222,000 
4,307,000 
4,308,000 
4,296,000 

4,295,000 
4,131,000 
4,032.000 


3,794,700 
3,757,500 
3,759,800 
3,729,900 
3,751,600 
3,623,700 
3,507,100 
3,484,000 
3,493,800 
3,513,500 

3,609,300 
3,713,500 
3,781,400 


330,200 




279,500 


August . . 


280,200 


July 


294,100 


June 


296,400 


May 


364,300 


AprU 


714,900 


March 


823,000 


February 


814,200 




782,500 


1959-December 


685,700 
417,500 


October 


250,600 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUAHY 1967 



197 



F — ^Prices 

TABLE F-l— TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PBIC